Buy Used
£2.74
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lady with Lapdog and other Stories Mass Market Paperback – May 1969


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
£26.84 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"



Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New impression edition (May 1969)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140441433
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140441437
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 516,327 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born in 1860 in Taganrog, a
port in southern Russia. His father was a former serf. In 1879, after
receiving a classical education at the Taganrog Gymnasium, he
moved to Moscow to study medicine. During his university years he
helped support his family by writing stories and sketches for
humorous magazines. By 1888 he was contributing to Russia's most
prestigious literary journals and regarded as a major writer. He also
started writing plays: his first full-length play, Ivanov, was produced
in 1887. After undertaking a journey to visit the penal colony on the
Siberian island of Sakhalin in 1890, he settled on a country estate
outside Moscow, where he continued to write and practise medicine.
His failing health forced him to move to Yalta in 1898, where he
wrote his most famous short story, 'The Lady with the Little Dog'
(1899), and two of his best-known plays: Three Sisters (1901) and
The Cherry Orchard (1904), written with Stanislavsky's Moscow Art
Theatre in mind. In 1901 he married the company's leading actress,
Olga Knipper. He died from tuberculosis in Badenweiler, Germany,
in July 1904 at the age of 44.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Silvertip on 7 Feb 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Chekhov writes in an honest style, writing about characters with faults whilst reserving judgement. This collection contains stories of irony and bad luck yet without diving too deep into the misery of the subjects. Each short story contains a unique set of characters that set the action of the story and Chekhov often objectifies them within the setting to cleverly represent their emotions none too obviously. A skilled set of tales that in their subject matter are timeless and will always be a pleasure to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Nov 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
I have just started reading this, and am enjoying it very much! Deliciously short shapshots of life, full of vivacity and thankfully lacking the usual measure of humdrum navel-gazing prose that some Russian literature contains. I am eager to see how these stories develop!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Best Translation of Chekov's Short Stories 3 Sep 2006
By Courtney M. Chapin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This particular collection/translation is far and away the closest any english-speaking reader can come to experiencing Chekov in his native tongue. In his introduction, translator David Magarshack writes "reading [these stories] one gets the impression of holding life itself, like a fluttering bird, in one's cupped hands." Magarshack's sensitivity as a translator is unparalled, and this small, immaculately chosen collection of Chekov's work will leave readers marvelling at his ability to bring a character to life in two paragraghs, bring a sunset to life in two sentences, and capture the timeless experiences of life, love and loss in only a few pages. This particular Penguin Classic is now out of print, but definitely worth searching out. This one sets the standard-- no

Chekov collection is complete without it.
Four Stars 8 Oct 2014
By Freddy's - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
ok
7 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Memories from the past... 19 Mar 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Lady with the Little Dog is about a chance love affair that takes possession of two people and changes them against their will, and which closes with them far apart and rarely able to meet.One intimate meeting, changed their entire outlook towards life.In The Lady with the Lap Dog, Gurov and Anna are both married.Both have gone on a stolen holiday to Yalta, a resort notorious for its casual love affairs. One interesting thing is that Chehkov never described the seduction unlike the later novelists. The memories from their affair haunts them and they want to be together forever. Every time they meet, they have to over come the fact that they both are married.The real subject of the story is this serious conflict in the minds of the lovers. Every two or three months after this they will meet and wrestle with their dilemma. Chekhov doesnt want to end the novel in a typical manner. He wants the rest to be interpreted by the reader's imagination. Thats the best part of the novel in point of view. Many of us have gone through this situation ourselves. We may have betrayed our loved ones once in a while.A night with a stranger might haunt us throughout the rest of our life. Every one has certain priorities in their life. The novel explains few critical decisions a person takes while tacking one of the most sensitive issues of their lives.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback