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Comment: THIS CD IS THE SAME AS LISTED BUT MINE AS A BROWN COVER WITH THE DOORS PICTURES IN THE MIDDLE. IT IS IN AS NEW CONDITION. USUALLY POSTED WITHIN 24 HOURS FROM THE UK.. U
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La Woman Limited Edition, Original recording remastered


Price: £13.99
Only 5 left in stock.
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£13.99 Only 5 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by playanywhere.

Amazon's The Doors Store

Music

Image of album by The Doors

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Biography

With an intoxicating, genre-blending sound, provocative and uncompromising songs, and the mesmerizing power of singer Jim Morrison's poetry and presence, the Doors had a transformative impact not only on popular music but on popular culture.

The Doors' arrival on the rock scene in 1967 marked not only the start of a string of hit singles and albums that would become stone ... Read more in Amazon's The Doors Store

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Frequently Bought Together

La Woman + The Doors + Strange Days
Price For All Three: £25.37

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Product details

  • Audio CD (28 Aug. 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Limited Edition, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Elektra
  • ASIN: B00004U8DV
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  DVD Audio  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (119 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 310,015 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Our product to treat is a regular product. There is not the imitation. From Japan by the surface mail because is sent out, take it until arrival as 7-14 day. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Doreen Guest on 1 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD
No this one is not just another reissue of the well known album but also one for the discerning Doors fans and collectors, the 2 CD triple fold out set featuring as it does, alongside the original album, different versions of 7 of the 10 tunes (exceptions being Hyacinth House (unfortunately as it is a beautiful song), LAmerica and Crawling King Snake). There is also the image of Morrison crucified on a telegraph pole included with the early original vinyl issue on a poster and on the inner sleeve.
They were all recorded in The Doors Workshop at the time of the LA Woman sessions (hence the title of the double vinyl edition, The Workshop Sessions (which features only the alternate versions but does not appear to be widely available at present). The quality of the alternative versions is, as one would expect, excellent of course and I am surprised that they have never appeared before though thats probably down to the cynical record company penchant for making maximum money off old material (not that I am a cynic myself, you understand).
Enough has been said about the original album so I will concentrate here on the alternative versions. I have not actually compared them to the originals, merely listened to the unreleased ones and said what comes to mind, but I can say with certainty that most of the alternate versions are less polished than those used on the album and, indeed, sound at times like demos rather than alternate takes. One does in fact mention the take number which probably means that none of them are actually demos. Studio chat features too.
The Changeling, which Jim tells the band is his favourite number, is longer at nearly 5 minutes and powers along at around the same speed as the album version but with a different keyboard riff.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By D. J. H. Thorn VINE VOICE on 28 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
The Doors' last album before Jim Morrison's death stands apart from their earlier releases. Grittier and bluesier, it isn't representative of what made them successful, but has its own aura. The cover shot shows a grizzlier, chunkier Morrison, no longer the budding sex god, and his vocal delivery is that of a more mature hell raiser. Two additional musicians on rhythm and bass guitars are also featured, so that Ray Manzarek's keyboards, though still prominent, are less dominant. The result is that the band sounds less different from other bands than before, but they also sound more fluid.

Blues forms the main thread to the album. There are three straight examples of the form, but there are, as usual, surprises. 'L'America' is the most uncomfortable listening and reveals that Morrison still possessed plenty of menace. 'Love Her Madly' is deliciously light and melodic, Manzarek's piano skipping along, as is 'Hyacinth House'. 'Changeling' provides an earthy opening, while the title track fairly bombs along, allowing each member to stretch out. This is one of the album's trump cards, but two more are left until the end. 'Texas Radio and The Big Beat' sees Morrison on mischievous form and it does indeed feature a big beat. The crowning achievement is of course 'Riders On The Storm,' a soundtrack for psychopaths everywhere, full of beautiful sounds and dark dramas. Possibly not to every fan's liking, 'LA Woman' is nevertheless a superb performance.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mike London on 11 Sept. 2012
Format: Audio CD
At last, after turning in an excellent but sadly straightforward album with MORRISON HOTEL (see my review), The Doors delve deeper into the blues and come up with this (unknown at the time) swan song. By this time, Morrison's fast lifestyle was rapidly catching up to him; his voice was deteriorating, he was fat, and he looked much older than his years. Morrison could still conjure up vocals reminiscent of the first two records (mainly "Riders on the Storm"). Overall, this world-weary voice fit in perfectly with the blues outfit The Doors had turned themselves into.

While the majority of their previous album sounds like it could have been written and recorded by anybody, LA WOMAN certainly sounds bluesy, but here the songs are written with the idiosyncracies that made the band so endearing in the first place. From the acid trip of "The Wasp (Texas Radio and the Big Beat)" to the seedy, decadent portrait of LA in the title track, The Doors shows us that, no matter how hard they want to be a blues band, they just too undeniably weird and unique to make a true blues album. And, ironically, that's what makes LA WOMAN such a powerful record. It's blues but blues like only The Doors could play, and that's what makes it such a rich, compelling listen.

The hit singles off this effort were "Love Her Madly," "LA Woman," and the radio rock staple "Riders on the Storm." "Love Her Madly" is one of The Doors' catchiest songs. "LA Woman" stands as one of The Doors' very best songs, with its decadent portrait of LA and its paean to some larger-than-life woman who consumes landscape, and could very well be a symbol of the city itself.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mr. William Rodwell on 31 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
A lot like Abbey Road, this, what turned out to be final effort from the Doors, ties things up brilliantly. 1970 was the end of an era and for many records of this time there is a sort of "coming down" - LA Woman has this in spades. The music is superb, as you would expect from a band that had many years of practise, but made more so by the move towards a bluesier feel. However, it is Jim Morrison's voice that gives it an edge; cigarettes and alcohol have blurred the edges and deepened the tone. Added to which are some of the more intriguing lyrics that he wrote. What are they doing in the Hyacinth House? Whatever it is the feeling is so tired, and so longing for conclusion. The conclusion, as such, is Riders on the Storm which never fails to leave you numb. It is one of those songs that you wish would never end.

In short this is a brilliant album and even after 23 years of listening to it I never tire. The sentiments, emotions and feelings that are evoked by the songs always leave me wishing that somehow, perhaps, there could have been more. Even so, what a conclusion!
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