£7.19
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £1.62
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

L'Assommoir (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 29 Jan 2009


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£4.39 £4.77

Frequently Bought Together

L'Assommoir (Oxford World's Classics) + Nana (Oxford World's Classics) + La Bête humaine (Oxford World's Classics)
Price For All Three: £21.57

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.62
Trade in L'Assommoir (Oxford World's Classics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.62, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks; Reissue edition (29 Jan 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199538689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199538683
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 3 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,993 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'if Mauldon moves on, as one hopes she will, to another Zola novel, she will not find herself facing again the difficulties that beset her with L'Assommoir and which she has overcome so brilliantly'Times Literary Supplement

'Margaret Mauldon begins her brief "notes on the translation" ... calling it "a notoriously difficult text to translate" ... if Mauldon moves on, as one hopes she will, to another Zola novel, she will not find herself facing again the difficulties that beset her with L'Assommoir and which she has overcome so brilliantly.'Times Literary Supplement

About the Author

Robert Lethbridge is Fellow and Director of Studies in Modern and Medieval Languages at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. Margaret Mauldon lives in Amhurst, Massachusetts, and is working on other World's Classics translations.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By sophie leonard on 5 April 2010
Format: Paperback
people tend to liken zola to dickens for the way in which he took a broad view of society, spending as much, if not more, time exploring and documenting the life of the working class than any other writer i can think of. this comparison is kind on dickens.

there are no cartoon villains or two-dimensional virgin waifs in zola, just credible, fallible characters who have a real reek of authenticity about them.

in l'assommoir zola documents the rise and fall of another member of the rougon-macquart clan, gervaise, who drags herself out of the gutter only to plunge back into it through by ill-chosen men and a displays of wealth designed to annoy her friends and family. the set-pieces involving gervaise's grand meals are spectacularly handled and oddly modern in the examination of politiking and display - anyone who has endured an excruciating dinner party or even christmas dinner with less than lovely inlaws will be nodding all the way through.

i don't want to give too much away but this is a book which does not disappoint. the translation - always a minefield with zola - is clear and concise and the dialogue especially gives a credible impression of the language and rhythm of working class speech.

if you have read nana already try this next and see her origins - if not order both as they are best appreciated together and do flow on.

five stars
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bob Ventos on 7 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback
Paris - about the 1860s. Gervaise, a young laundress, is deserted by her drunkard lover Lantier and left with two children. Henceforth suspicious of men, she is finally won over by Coupeau, a roofer, because he doesn't drink. She opens a laundry business with money from another admirer, and things are going well. However, after a serious accident, Coupeau changes for the worst, starts boozing, and drags her down with him to an terrible alcoholic end. It all sounds like a total tale of misery, but there's something about Zola's marvellous style, his control of detail and naturalistic conversation, and his refusal - unlike any other mainstream C19th writer I've read - to self-censor the grubby and sexual aspects of life, that made it extraordinarily gripping. It brought home a sense of its era - the sheer heroism of poor people's struggle to stay respectable and to survive when one slip could cast you into the gutter - more clearly than any other similar novel I've come across. There are some amazing set-piece scenes too: a vastly long (but fascinating and truly French) description of a big meal, a fight between two women in a laundry, a visit by a wedding-party to the Louvre - and we get taken into many fascinating places of work as well as many wine-shops and bars, including the sinister L'Assommoir of the title. Why did no-one tell me before how good Zola is? And apparently there's acres of his stuff about...
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Zola fan TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Mar 2011
Format: Paperback
In my opinion Zola is the least high-brow of the literary greats, he writes with insight and his compassion for the plight of the working classes of his time is evident. Zola has been compared to Dickens and although a great compliment to most writers, personally I think Zola is better because his style is simpler and more earthy - for a real shocker of a portrayal of drunkenness and incest, see Zola's 'The Earth'.

L'Assommoir (The Pot House) is a tragic tale of the working classes living in the slums of Paris and centres on the aspirations of the easy-going Gervaise who yearns to run her own laundry. Without resorting to romantic and maudlin tactics, Zola describes in graphic detail the descent of our would-be heroine - is she destined for a life of drunkenness, promiscuity, filth and poverty? Hardly cheerful reading but the book is not without humour and in its own way, just as riveting as a modern thriller i.e. "what happens next?".

My own copy is from the 1970s and although the translation is good, I've found that newer copies of Zola's books have a much better colloquial translation and call a spade a spade which perhaps was not permitted in the early publications (the language in a particular scene in The Earth is quite course and in keeping with the characters). Zola's novels are absolutely brilliant, whether he is writing about the middle-classes and their scheming mistresses, incestuous siblings in village life or just the every day stifling poverty in the city, he gives us a good understanding of the people and period.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lizanne Jones on 17 Oct 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very disappointed with this translation - in fact I'd go as far as to say that the translation does not do this book any favours at all. All the characters speak like they have - sort of - come out of the East End of London... Should have bought the Penguin Classic version in retro. They say you shouldn't judge a book by a cover but this one even features a brunette Gervaise!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback