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Kyoto2: How to Manage the Global Greenhouse Paperback – 25 Jul 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 124 pages
  • Publisher: Zed Books Ltd (25 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848130252
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848130258
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 852,252 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"The most intelligent treatment of the politics and economics of climate change I have ever read. Brilliant, clear and unanswerable"--George Monbiot"Tickell's background helps him pack an astonishing wealth of data and nontrivial analyses of complex issues into this small volume...This volume will be valuable for undergraduate and graduate students in environmental science and policy, and essential for faculty and professionals... Highly recommended." --CHOICE

About the Author

Oliver Tickell is a leading campaigner and researcher on climate issues and has contributed pieces to a number of major international media outlets. He also runs tfX: the UK campaign against trans fats in food.

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dr. A. Martin on 15 Aug 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a short, intense and very readable book, with a clear and direct exposition of the Kyoto 2 proposal for saving the world. Nothing less.

If you're hoping for deep exposition of the numbers which Tickell uses to make his case, you'll have to dig into his extensive bibliography. Kyoto 2 critics should make sure they do that before opening fire.

All engineers will find something to annoy them - Tickell cites the Severn Barrage, wind power, nuclear fusion, hydrogen, carbon capture and fuel cells as parts of the solution, and every engineer is deeply opposed to at least one of those ideas (take your pick).

But so what? Tickell has a succinct and robust set of propositions. You could take away any dozen of the specific technologies and policies he cites, and Kyoto 2 would still look like the only game in town. It's inherently strong, not at all dependent on any particular technology, and a prisoner to absolutely no ideology.

There are several dozen doctoral theses to be had on "the best" way to implement Kyoto 2. Several of them have no doubt already been written. May the detail be done, in good time. Right now, I just want to get my shoulder behind the wheel.

So when the next election comes, I'll have a note pinned to my front door thus: "Election canvassers: if your candidate supports Kyoto 2, ring the bell and tell me. Otherwise, go away."

Finally, if you avoid climate change books because the whole subject is such a downer (and is there any deeper downer to be had?), you will find this one a refreshing change. Tickell isn't going to be gentle with you - this book is more like a walk in the Outer Hebrides in a winter gale - challenging, invigorating, and a great hangover cure. Moping ends and action starts.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Robert Gibson on 26 Aug 2008
Format: Paperback
Do you agree with the G8 that at least a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is required by 2050 to avoid dangerous climate change?
Do you worry that it will not be possible to achieve this?
If you do then read this book. It is a well written, convincing argument for a `Kyoto2' solution which will work after the Kyoto Protocol expires in 2012. Kyoto2 has three legs:
1. Put a price on most carbon emissions by requiring producers of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas producing industrial process to buy tradable carbon emission credits. (Chapter 4)
2. Regulate to promote energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions - for example energy star labelling and building codes (Chapter 5)
3. Use money from auctioning carbon credits to pay for research on low carbon technology, on reducing land-use emissions and on adapting to climate change (Chapter 6)

While putting a price on carbon is the `main mechanism' of the proposal, regulating for energy efficiency and funding of new technology play a major role in reducing emissions. Their contribution reduces the amount of change which must be driven by the price on greenhouse gas emissions and thus allows this price to be moderate - perhaps US$30/tonne. This US$30/tonne provides US$1,000 billion/annum funding for technology research and makes low carbon technologies more attractive but doesn't inflict severe stress on the economy.

In support of its proposal, the book notes the ozone fighting Montreal Protocol as a very effective demonstration of the merits of regulating emissions and funding research. Did you know the Montreal Protocol has reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than the Kyoto Protocol, and has done so at substantially less cost per tonne than Kyoto?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Anning on 8 Sep 2008
Format: Paperback
The holistic approach outlined in Kyoto 2 appears to be a credible way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions over time whilst adapting old technologies associated with the production of fossil fuels, developing and expanding alternative clean and renewable energy options, putting systems in place to help countries that are now suffering from the effects of climate change as well as protecting them from future effects and looking at and developing geo - engineering solutions should they be needed in the future - all to be funded by the sale of permits to those most responsible for greenhouse gas emissions upstream close to the source.

What has particularly interested me, though, is that Kyoto2 has addressed the problem of protecting existing natural tropical forest, and of regenerating degraded forest, by attaching a monetary value to doing so and has achieved this without the conflicts that can arise when generated as an offset against CO2 emmissions.

It is extremely difficult to convince tropical forest resource owners/ managers to manage their forests in a sustainable way, ie reduce the amount of trees they cut per hectare, without compensating them financially just because it's the right thing to do for the long term. Many logging companies are only interested in generating revenue over the short term and are not convinced that the extra premium, or market access, that products from certification schemes such as FSC can attract outweigh the diminished revenue created by reduced allowable cuts and the perceived extra costs associated with reduced impact logging techniques that they would have to employ to meet certification standards.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The solution to global warming 8 Sep 2008
By J. Robert Gibson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Do you agree with the G8 that at least a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions is required by 2050 to avoid dangerous climate change? Do you worry that it will not be possible to achieve this? If you do then read this book. It is a well written, convincing argument for a `Kyoto2' set of policies to replace the current Kyoto Protocol.

The Kyoto2 proposal has three legs:
1. Put a price on most carbon emissions by requiring producers of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas producing industrial process to buy tradable carbon emission premits. (Chapter 4)
2. Regulate for energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions - eg energy star labelling and building codes (Chapter 5)
3. Use money from auctioning carbon credits to pay for research on low carbon technology, on reducing land-use emissions and on adapting to climate change (Chapter 6)

Under the proposal regulating for energy efficiency and funding of new technology play a major role in reducing emissions. This reduces the amount of change which must be driven by the price on greenhouse gas emissions and thus allows this price to be moderate - perhaps US$30/tonne. The auction of carbon emission permits at US$30/tonne provides raises US$1,000 billion per annum to fund technology research, make low carbon technologies more attractive and pay for adaptation.

In support of its proposal, the book notes the ozone fighting Montreal Protocol as a very effective demonstration of the merits of regulating emissions and funding research. Did you know the Montreal Protocol has reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than the Kyoto Protocol, and has done so at substantially less cost per tonne than Kyoto?

The book has two significant omissions:
1. Little coverage of how its `Kyoto2' proposal might be implemented. In particular how a phased implementation might work.
2. Not considering how revenue and competitive advantage issues drive businesses to adopt energy inefficient practices. These issues greatly increase the strength of the argument for the regulatory controls proposed in Chapter 5.

The book lives up to its title `How to Manage the Global Greenhouse'. It is an important proposal for a solution which anyone concerned with preventing dangerous climate change should read.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
At last, something that could actually work... 7 Sep 2008
By Dr. A. Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a short, intense and very readable book, with a clear and direct exposition of the Kyoto 2 proposal for saving the world. Nothing less.

If you're hoping for deep exposition of the numbers which Tickell uses to make his case, you'll have to dig into his extensive bibliography. Kyoto 2 critics should make sure they do that before opening fire.

All engineers will find something to annoy them - Tickell cites the Severn Barrage, wind power, nuclear fusion, hydrogen, carbon capture and fuel cells as parts of the solution, and every engineer is deeply opposed to at least one of those ideas (take your pick).

But so what? Tickell has a succinct and robust set of propositions. You could take away any dozen of the specific technologies and policies he cites, and Kyoto 2 would still look like the only game in town. It's inherently strong, not at all dependent on any particular technology, and a prisoner to absolutely no ideology.

There are several dozen doctoral theses to be had on "the best" way to implement Kyoto 2. Several of them have no doubt already been written. May the detail be done, in good time. Right now, I just want to get my shoulder behind the wheel.

So when the next election comes, I'll have a note pinned to my front door thus: "Election canvassers: if your candidate supports Kyoto 2, ring the bell and tell me. Otherwise, go away."

Finally, if you avoid climate change books because the whole subject is such a downer (and is there any deeper downer to be had?), you will find this one a refreshing change. Tickell isn't going to be gentle with you - this book is more like a walk in the Outer Hebrides in a winter gale - challenging, invigorating, and a great hangover cure. Moping ends and action starts.
Great review and thought provoker 4 Jan 2010
By J. J. Kwiatkowski - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A very readable resume of the status quo, and very interesting suggestions for future protocols and markets. Exceptionally well reasoned throughout.
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