Kur of Gor (Gorean Saga Book 28) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£21.95
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Kur of Gor has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Kur of Gor Paperback – 23 Nov 2009


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 23 Nov 2009
£21.95
£21.95 £21.95
£21.95 FREE Delivery in the UK. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Kur of Gor + Swordsmen of Gor (Gorean Saga) + Mariners of Gor (Gorean Saga)
Price For All Three: £48.92

Some of these items are dispatched sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.29
Trade in Kur of Gor for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.29, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 730 pages
  • Publisher: eReads.com (23 Nov. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0759297827
  • ISBN-13: 978-0759297821
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 4.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,192,520 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ricky Bolt on 3 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
This book has so much potential but Norman ruins it by his constant barrage on about how women all really want to be slaves and good for nothing but to serve men. Now having read all the Gor books I was ready for this but this book just takes it to new levels of tedium.
Every time the story gets any pace going you get a four page rant on how being a slave is the natural state for woman and they are all weak and pathetic.
I don't jest when I say the first two chapters contain about 2 pages of story development and the rest is just a dissertation on the woman's role in Norman's eyes. It is really something you would expect from a sad 12 year old and gets very boring very fast and keeps coming up every few pages. At least half of this book contains this utter tripe.
That said with the help of a good editor or a sharp smack around Norman's head with a brick (probably by any woman that reads this) there is a really good book trying to get out and you cannot doubt John Norman's imagination, you just want to smack him really hard and tell him to grow up!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Previous reveiwers have hit the nail on the head with this one.
First - eh what ???? ( M.Steedman). At the end of Tarl Cabot`s last outing (Magicians of Gor) he was in Ar plotting with his friend Marcus how to galvanise Ar`s forces to regain their city from the Cos invasion force. Now he is stuck in a bottle with two females on a different planet !! Having had to get over the disappointment of no further development of Cabot`s plans in Ar - the story itself is not a bad one and being told by a third party (I agree with Marshall Lord - probably a Kur) it does help in keeping the story moving without quite as much of the inevitable Norman rant about all women want to mastered by men. It really does get monotonous and like Ricky Bolt says you do want to give the writer a good slap around the head or get a decent editor to get rid of this repetitive tripe. We have been told this time and time again and that is enough we do not need it repeating every other chapter !! Like many other readers I just skip these passages and move on to the next bit of relevent narrative. Putting both frustrations aside Kur Of Gor is for the most part an enjoyable read and a worthy addition to the Gor series. At 770+ pages it is a not an easy read but for devotees like myself it provides a new insight into the Kurii and the fascinating world of Gor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marshall Lord TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the 28th book in the lengthy "Gorean saga" of SF/Fantasy novels. Up to now these have been set mostly on the planet Gor, which supposedly shares the orbit of Earth but on the opposite side of the sun so that our astronomers cannot detect it.

And at long, long last, after a wait of about 21 years, we finally get the next major installment in Tarl Cabot's story.

Tarl Cabot is the main hero of the series, but this is the first book since 1988 which has concentrated on the story from his perspective. BTW, his surname is presumably pronounced "Cabbo" as he was born in Bristol and seems to be related to the famous Bristol family of explorers. I used to live in that city, and "Cabbo" is how Bristolians pronounce the name of their greatest explorer.

This book differs from the previous books in the series in two respects: first, it is told in the third person by a narrator who is never identified. Secondly, none of the action of this story takes place on either Earth or Gor: this book is set entirely in space. It starts on the "Prison Moon" which is an artificial satellite of the planet Gor. As the name suggests this used as a prison by the rulers of the planet. But the action soon moves to one of the "Steel Worlds" which are artificial habitats in this system's asteroid belt.

This was the first "Gor" book for about thirty years which in my humble opinion came anything close to the standard of the first thirteen or so books in the series.

The first 25 books in the saga were published between 1969 and 1988. Then after a long gap, John Norman published two more novels in the "noughties" but both "
...Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By KJ on 16 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
John Norman books are part of my ever growing collection and I really find the reading great and it paints a picture of what its about
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Steedman on 9 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read Witness and Prize, I regarded them as "scene setting books" and looked forward to the next Tarl Cabot book, as he liberated Ar for the third time.

Instead we got this.

The story is written in the third party, and I do think towards the end it is clear it was written by another earth girl/slave. Surprisingly though the book does make more use of the 700 pages to tell a story than I have come to expect from John Norman. It is a big story with less padding than usual.

The account starts with the Kur breaking into a prison and liberating Tarl Cabot. The prison itself is claimed to be on the third moon of Gor. No account is supplied as to how he got there or who put him there, although it is presumed to be a Priest King Prison. Tarl then accompanies his liberators back to their "steel Worlds", where he gets caught up in a Kur civil war.

While reading this I had the strong imression I had read this book before, in fact I put it down to reread Priestkings of Gor, then started spotting the similarities.

Overall I enjoyed the book, it is certainly one of the better ones, although it feels at times like a rewrite of Preistkings, I just cannot see how it ties in with the preceeding books.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback