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Krondor: The Assassins (The Riftwar Legacy, Book 2) Paperback – 4 Sep 2000


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Krondor: The Assassins (The Riftwar Legacy, Book 2) + Krondor: Tear of the Gods (The Riftwar Legacy, Book 3) + Krondor: The Betrayal (The Riftwar Legacy, Book 1)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager; New Ed edition (4 Sep 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006483356
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006483359
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 4.9 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 81,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Feist is one of the world's leading fantasy writers. His Riftwar and Serpentwar Sagas have been global bestsellers for years.
Born and raised in Southern California, Raymond E. Feist was educated at the University of California, San Diego, where he graduated with honours in Communication Arts. He is the author of the bestselling and critically acclaimed Riftwar Saga.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Krondor: the Assassins is book two of Raymond Feist's The Riftwar Legacy, set in the world of his 1982-92 debut Riftwar series. As The Encyclopedia of Fantasy puts it, Feist is "an adept manipulator of standard material". This is comfortable action-adventure fantasy using well-worn props and settings, as a group of likeable characters return from the wars of book one (Krondor: the Betrayal) to deal with twin threats to their kingdom. A vicious gang of outsiders is killing off Krondor city's established thieves' guild, the Mockers, while sinister, fanatical assassins known as Nighthawks are for some reason targeting people with magic abilities. Also threatened are visiting nobles from a rival kingdom. Someone is trying to provoke war. There's lots of action and swordplay as a hunting party runs into were-leopards and massed assassin attack, and a secret fortress of diabolical cultists is stormed by just three of our heroes in the manner of Indiana Jones. New physical and magical threats appear at regular intervals and are rapidly dealt with, the emphasis being on excitement rather than suspense. Feist provides enjoyable dialogue, moments of comedy, a touch of savvy political intrigue and unfailing narrative flow. All ends satisfyingly, with one hidden villain still on the loose and devilishly plotting world domination in book three. --David Langford

Review

Praise for Raymond E. Feist:

'File under guilty pleasure'
Guardian

'Get in at the start of a master's new series'
Daily Sport

'Well-written and distinctly above average… intelligent… intriguing.'
Publishers Weekly

' Epic scope…vivid imagination…a significant contribution to the growth of the field of fantasy.'
Washington Post


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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 July 2001
Format: Paperback
How sadly appropriate that this work should bear in its title the word 'tear' for it is surely a threnody, a lament for the skill of a man who was arguably the greatest fantasy writer of our time after Tolkein.
Feist's great ability was to describe his worlds in intricate detail and to bring forth characters that sprang from the pages in their realism. When magic and fantastical acts occured the reader could accept these without question. A talking dragon, a rift in space, a goblin, all were as believable as a taxi in London or New York.
His characters were real people and he made them interact with each other just as real people do, it did not matter that they were fighting the forces of darkness and evil aided by magic.
'Tear' on the other hand presents us with a plot so shallow that it is not worthy of the name. The work is so full of gratuitous slaughter that it lacks the moral depth of earlier works. The characters are automata, poor Squire James is but a shadow of his earlier self. Even the syntax is second rate and just how many 'deft blows' must one expect in one book?
Was this book really written by the same Promethean author who gave the world 'Magician'and 'A Darkness at Sethanon' - come on Feist you can do better than this!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Feb 2001
Format: Hardcover
After the Serpentwar saga, which was particularly enjoyable for beginning to move the series in new directions, Feist has decided to return to an earlier period of Midkemian history and to older, staler situations. With this installment, Feist has once more sacrificed his imagination and slavishly - not to mention tediously - carved out another book based on a computer game.
The plot and tone never escape the simplistic and no new ground is covered... The book is a morass of cliches and caricatures, including the feisty (no pun intended) young magician heroine, a tough (and Scottish sounding, sorry that's Dwarvish in Midkemia, isn't it?) warrior priest who oozes old-campaigner style advice and the cowardly character who overcomes his fears long enough to be useful. Oh and I nearly forgot the dastardly, dastardly villain.
And then there are the fight scenes. Lots and lots of fight scenes. After every couple of pages of tedious dialogue or exposition, Feist seems to feel obligated to produce another identi-kit style battle sequence, occasionally changing the nature of the opponent, but never the level of stupidity.
Ultimately, this book has nothing more to offer than padding out the scraps of information given out during the Serpentwar and something to prop up the coffee-table...
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Mar 2001
Format: Paperback
I love Feist's books and have done since I picked up Magician, whilst casting around for something new to read in a bookshop, for no other reason than its cover. "Krondor: The Betrayal" was not Feists best book, and although this is from the same series, it's definitely back to form. Like all good Feist books it practically reads itself you get so engrossed in the story!
I am hoping that he will do a similar 'filling the gaps' type series for the riftwar (Magician) era, as even with the authors-cut there are still many things only touched upon.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 July 2001
Format: Paperback
The trilogy started with Krondor: The Betrayal which was taken from a computer game and showed all the signs of its origins.
Krondor: The Assassins was something of a return to form with a reliance on some of the more familiar Feist characters such as James and William.
However Tear of the Gods is more akin to Betrayal as again it betrays its computer game origins. The book is a series of set pieces much as you would find in a fantasy RPG on your PC. The characters walk around, meet someone, are given quests and then go and have a fight.
The basic story is quite good, but it needed to be fleshed out more with increased characterization.
The series does shed some light on some of the events in the Serpentwar Saga and for that I would recommend this series to devotees of Feist, however for the casual reader, they would be more advised to read the Riftwar Saga or the Empires Trilogy
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Mar 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is such a poor showing from the author who brought us the Serpent War Saga. Why did he do it. MONEY! Money is such a powerful force in the churning out of books. This is based on a computer game - he didn't even have to come up with the plot! The characters are 2D. I can't help but feel cheated by the whole process. I paid good money for this only to encourage Feist not to try and display his talent.
This is utterly dire. also I cannot possibly agree with the previous reviwers who praise Formula in books and rate the book with three or more stars saying Formulaicness is OK and is good. I am studying English Literature(I know that Feist is Americain) and so am able to comment. This is a poor example of any literary art form.
To put it frankly, THIS SUCKS!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ian Tapley VINE VOICE on 18 Jan 2005
Format: Paperback
THE STORY:
A decade after 'A Darkness At Sethanon', assassins trouble the court of Krondor. Sent out to deal with the return of the Nighthawks are a young foreign magician, Jimmy the Hand and Pug's son William.
WHAT'S GOOD:
Of the three Krondor books, this is the only one not based on a computer game. Consequently, this is the only one worth reading. Feist concentrates on action and adventure in this book but does add in his usual bit of political intrigue. The infiltration of the cult fortress and what they find therein is wonderfully gripping climax and, as the Amazon reviewer pointed out, is very 'Indiana Jones'.
WHAT'S BAD:
This isn't a particularly deep book in general, choosing to be a crowd pleaser than a thought provoker. Also, reading this book may prompt you to read the other two books in the trilogy which would be A VERY BAD THING!
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