Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth-Century Britain and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth-Century Britain on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth-Century Britain [Hardcover]

Stephen Heathorn
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 70.00
Price: 68.15 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 1.85 (3%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 18 Sep.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 64.74  
Hardcover 68.15  

Book Description

28 April 2013
Lord Kitchener and Lord Haig are two monumental figures of the First World War. Their reputations, both in their lifetimes and after their deaths, have been attacked and defended, scrutinized and contested. They have been depicted in film, print and public memorials in Britain and the wider world, and new biographies of both men appear to this day. The material representations of Haig and Kitchener were shaped, used and manipulated for official and popular ends by a variety of groups at different times during the twentieth century. The purpose of this study is not to discover the real individual, nor to attack or defend their reputations, rather it is an exploration of how both men have been depicted since their deaths and to consider what this tells us about the nature and meaning of First World War commemoration. While Haig's representation was more contested before the Second World War than was Kitchener's, with several constituencies trying to fashion and use Haig's memory - the Government, the British Legion, ex-servicemen themselves, and bereaved families - it was probably less contested, but overwhelmingly more negative, than Kitchener's after the Second World War. The book sheds light on the notion of 'heroic' masculinity - questioning, in particular, the degree to which the image of the common soldier replaced that of the high commander in the popular imagination - and explores how the military heritage in the twentieth century came into collision with the culture of modernity. It also contributes to ongoing debates in British historiography and to the larger debates over the social construction of memory, the problematic relation between what is considered 'heritage' and 'history', and the need for historians to be sensitive and attentive to the interconnections between heritage and history and their contexts.

Product details

  • Hardcover: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Ashgate; New edition edition (28 April 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0754669653
  • ISBN-13: 978-0754669654
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,610,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'This is an excellent and enjoyable book that makes readers think afresh about what they already know and persuade them of its interpretation. The direction and the methodology is innovative and makes a real contribution to the fields of modern British history and the study of the remembrance of the First World War. Heathorn is particularly to be congratulated on his ability to match the history of the memorialisation of Kitchener and Haig into a broader history of Britain in the twentieth century - an impressive achievement.'Dan Todman, Queen Mary University of London, UK

About the Author

Stephen Heathorn is Professor of British History and Director of Graduate Studies of the Department of History at McMaster University, Canada. He is the author of For Home, Country and Race (University of Toronto Press, 2000) and more than two dozen academic articles on the history of nationalism, commemoration and heritage in Britain.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
Format:Hardcover
Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth-Century Britain. Remembrance, Representation and Appropriation by Stephen Heathorn, Ashgate, London, April 2013, 268pp, 11 ills, notes & refs, index. 65.00.

This is a timely book as we approach the centenaries of the Great War, a period when various historiographical interpretations will grapple for supremacy. For the central thesis of this intriguing study is that the personal reputations of prominent figures such as Kitchener and Haig became prisms through which differing interpretations of the war itself were reflected. Heathorn, a Canadian academic, has not set out to write a dual biography of Kitchener and Haig. Rather, his purpose is to examine how the material representations of both was shaped and manipulated for official and populist ends by a variety of individuals and groups throughout the twentieth century. Neither is the book an attack or defence of Haig and Kitchener's reputations. Instead it sets out to explore how both men have been depicted since their deaths in various mediums such as film, print and public memorialisation in Britain and the wider world, and to evaluate what this tells us about the evolving nature and meaning of Great War commemoration. Along the way, the author offers some fascinating insights into the on-going historiographical debates surrounding the two men and how, particularly in the case of Haig, the dichotomies -indeed polarities - between much professional historical remembrance and wider cultural remembrance can often appear unbridgeable.

Professor Heathorn is a social and cultural historian rather than a specialist military historian, and this book's purpose is not military history, so there are inevitably points of detail which I would query.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars REPUTATIONS AND THEIR EVOLVING APPROPRIATION AS SYMBOLS 26 Aug 2013
By George A. Webster - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
REPUTATIONS AND THEIR EVOLVING APPROPRIATION AS SYMBOLS

Haig and Kitchener in Twentieth-Century Britain. Remembrance, Representation and Appropriation by Stephen Heathorn, Ashgate, London, April 2013, 268pp, 11 ills, notes & refs, index. 65.00 (US$124.95).

This is a timely book as we approach the centenaries of the Great War, a period when various historiographical interpretations will grapple for supremacy. For the central thesis of this intriguing study is that the personal reputations of prominent figures such as Kitchener and Haig became prisms through which differing interpretations of the war itself were reflected. Heathorn, a Canadian academic, has not set out to write a dual biography of Kitchener and Haig. Rather, his purpose is to examine how the material representations of both was shaped and manipulated for official and populist ends by a variety of individuals and groups throughout the twentieth century. Neither is the book an attack or defence of Haig and Kitchener's reputations. Instead it sets out to explore how both men have been depicted since their deaths in various mediums such as film, print and public memorialisation in Britain and the wider world, and to evaluate what this tells us about the evolving nature and meaning of Great War commemoration. Along the way, the author offers some fascinating insights into the on-going historiographical debates surrounding the two men and how, particularly in the case of Haig, the dichotomies -indeed polarities - between much professional historical remembrance and wider cultural remembrance can often appear unbridgeable.

Professor Heathorn is a social and cultural historian rather than a specialist military historian, and this book's purpose is not military history, so there are inevitably points of detail which I would query. However, my overall impression of the book's main purpose and the way this is delivered is a very positive one, and I certainly recommend it as essential reading for anyone interested in Haig and Kitchener and the complex inter-relations between prominent personalities, historiography, and the sometimes peculiar ways in which mass media and public perceptions of the Great War have evolved and changed over nearly a century.

2013 George A. Webster

This review was originally published in `Records', the journal of the Douglas Haig Fellowship.
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback