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  • Kissin Plays Bach-Busoni, Beethoven and Schumann
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Kissin Plays Bach-Busoni, Beethoven and Schumann


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Biography

Evgeny Kissin was born in Moscow in October 1971 and began to play by ear and improvise on the piano at the age of two. At six years old, he entered a special school for gifted children, the Moscow Gnessin School of Music, where he was a student of Anna Pavlovna Kantor, who has remained his only teacher. At the age of ten, he made his concerto debut playing Mozart’s Piano Concerto K. 466 ... Read more in Amazon's Evgeny Kissin Store

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Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Chaconne in D Minor14:52Album Only
Listen  2. Rondo, Op. 51, No. 2 in G 8:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Rondo a capriccio, Op. 129 5:33£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Åußerst bewegt 2:54£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr innig und nicht zu rasch 2:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Intermezzo I 2:28£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Intermezzo II 4:53£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr aufgeregt; Etwas langsamer 4:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr langsam; Etwas bewegter 3:47£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr lebhaft 3:31£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr langsam; Etwas bewegter 4:28£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Sehr rasch; Noch schneller 1:58£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Kreisleriana, Op. 16: Schnell und spielend 3:39£0.99  Buy MP3 

Customer Reviews

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Amazon.com: 19 reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
A Profound Chaconne and Virtuosic Beethoven and Schumann 27 Mar. 2001
By "sawoodworth" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mr. Kissin's playing of the Chaconne is simply astounding. Beyond his dazzling technique lies a reading of such power and brilliance as to convert even those skeptics who somehow continue to share Andras Schiff's distaste for Busoni's monumental transcription of the fifth movement of Bach's second violin Partita. Kissin's playing is bold, refined, and above all, sensitive. Clear fingerwork is combined with expert pedaling and an extraordinary dynamic palette to create what is surely the greatest recording of the Chaconne, surpassing even Rubinstein, Michelangeli, Pletnev, and Say (the latter two of whom I recently heard in concert at Carnegie Hall, New York, and the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, Paris, respectively). Kissin's magnificent recorded career began as early as his moving and technically flawless reading of Schubert's Wanderer-Fantasie, absurdly criticized by an enormously inflated Gramophone Magazine critic as being philosophically (as well as technically) unconvincing and underdeveloped (I highly recommend this recording as well, especially for its touching account of the second movement, although the entire performance is nearly perfect). From the genius who produced that great recording has come this glorious Chaconne, certainly one of the most beautiful pieces in the piano repertoire.
Kissin's account of the Beethoven rondos is accurate and utterly thrilling, as is his reading of Schumann's Kreisleriana. In the latter, the tumultuous opening is wonderfully thick and Kissin's playing reaches towering heights in the ninth movement (sehr rasch, a marking used repeatedly by Schumann, whose tempo indications seem to favor extremities, as evidenced by the almost-comical markings of the G minor sonata) where the fugal motif, commencing in the left hand, is executed with almost super-human speed and accuracy (I almost hesitate to highlight this aspect of Mr. Kissin's playing, given the propensity of critics to judge him unfairly based on his intimidating virtuosity alone). In short, this disc contains some of the most phenomenally scintillating performances of the recording age. That of the Chaconne, the crowning triumph of Kissin's œuvre, will surely remain unsurpassed for years to come.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Amazing Depth snd Sensitivity 1 Sept. 2001
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I recently realized that a certain style of piano playing has come to be popular in the last 20 years. Ever since the death of Gilels, Horowitz and other old-time greats, pianists from around the world have adopted a cold, impersonal but technically brilliant style. Recordings and performances run smoothly with every note played to perfection, but emotionally they leave no lasting impression. Evgeniy Kissin is perhaps one of the only contemporary pianists that touches the heart with his open style.
This CD shows his range in interpreting three composers of very different styles. Here's a brief description of every piece.
Bach/Busoni- I've heard Bolet and Pletnev play this exquisite transcription of a Bach Chaconne, and I have to say I prefer Kissin because he seems to capture the style. He captures the best of both Bach's Baroque and Busoni's Romantic and balances them very well.
Beethoven- This was played very well, if a little dry. I had a few complaints about the first Rondo, but Rage Over a Lost Penny was right on the mark, with so much humor in it!
Schumann- Sometimes I wonder how a pianist can go so deep into the music that he seems to bring out the composer's personality. Schumann was going mad towards the end of his life, and his instability comes across in Kreisleriana (written for a character in a Hoffmann tale). Kissin captures that madness perfectly. From agitated to serene, the listener can hear the many sides of Schumann's personality coming from Kissin's playing.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Very natural and glittering, but somewhat facile 9 Feb. 2006
By Theophilus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
All three pieces are difficult in various ways. The Bach-Busoni has prismatic changes in theme transformations, odd hand positioning, and technical difficulties galore. Kissin handles all the above easily. This is Busoni at his most exciting. However, a certain depth is lacking. I guess I wanted to hear more of Bach in this piece.

This is the best Krieslieriana I have heard. It is played with a technical proficiency that only Kissin can muster. Again, it is extremely exciting and on the first few listenings, it captivates your attention well. However, after repeated listenings, I was wanting just a little more. I wanted more of the angst that Schumann wrote in his most soulful and yet schizoid work.

The Beethoven is again, technically glittering. No hesitations here. These are excellent interpretations of light showy pieces.

Overall, do buy this CD for Kissin's technique and naturalness.
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Cortot couldn't play like this even if he wanted to. 25 Nov. 2000
By Mireille Wastwater - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Seeing more manure contemptuously scattered around by people like Kalle Kuusava (one of the reviewers) who criticise Kissin, I feel obliged to write this. I have listened to many 'Golden Age' pianists, and many 'Modern' pianists and I fail to understand what some people have against wonders like Kissin. If Kissin plays 'straight' he is accused of being pianistic and not musical. If he lets his hair down and blazes through music, he is laughed at for being rash and showing off his technique. If he tries to defy his critics and plays extra musically, they claim he's playing self-centerdly and 'not letting the composer speak'. He is in a no-win situation. I could go on comparing the pianists of yesteryear with today, but this is meant to be a review of the CD. The playing is, as you'd expect, technically faultless. The way he plays the Chaconne reminded me of a cathedral for some reason. Sort of Franckian - grand. Like the rest of the recital, it is effortless and yes, it is musical. You shall not be disappointed if you buy this disc.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The pholyphonic pianist 22 Mar. 2000
By Vidar Palsson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Before we only had two really good recordings of the chaconne: Michelangeli and Rubinstein. Kissin's pholyphonic style suits the work well and he brings all possible inner lines into light. His playing is clear and sharp. The power at the end is thrilling, when he hammers the cords.
The Beethoven is played awfully fast and I can't help feeling that it's sometimes a bit too fast. On the other he's tecnically perfect and the interpretation comes out to be crisp and clear.
The Schumann is also very good. I can't get my finger on exactly where Kissin might do better but I sometimes feel as some edge is missing. I truly don't know what it is but I find the athmosphere not always as "Schumannian" as I would like. A little disapointment there since his Schumann at Carnegie Hall 1990 will always remain one of the greatest Schumann recordings of the past few decades.
Overall we have probably the best chaconne on CD, worth six star alone, but then very good Beethoven and Schumann that are not perfect but should be rated four stars individually. Conclusion: One star lost.
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