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King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table: From Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur (Illustrated Junior Library) Hardcover – Jun 1976


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap; Deluxe edition (Jun. 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0448060167
  • ISBN-13: 978-0448060163
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 17.2 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,026,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Roger Lancelyn Green was born in 1918 and lived in Oxford and at his family home in Cheshire, which the Greens had owned for more than 900 years. He loved storytelling and was fascinated by traditional fairy tales, myths and legends from around the world. He was a professional actor, a librarian and a teacher. His retellings include Egyptian, Greek and Norse legends, plus a retelling of Robin Hood. He also wrote many books for adults, including a biography of his friend C. S. Lewis, creator of the The Chronicles of Narnia. Roger Lancelyn Green died in 1987. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Then within two years King Uther fell sick of a great malady, and thereof he died. Read the first page
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Shauna on 17 Sept. 2003
Format: Paperback
I first read this book more than fifteen years ago while still at primary school. In the edition I read there were no illustrations but the quality and descriptive nature of the language had me hooked from the start. My imagination was fired by the heroic deeds of King Arthur and his Knights. This book is a great read and I would recommend it to anyone who like to lose themselves in a glorious book.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Martin Turner HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Feb. 2004
Format: Paperback
King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table is a detailed, authoritative _and_ exciting account of the Arthurian epic from beginning to end. Roger Lancelyn Green brought all his scholarship to bear in getting the details just right from the source texts, and, as much as possible, preserving even the original phraseology, including the memorable "'Where,' he said 'is the governor of this gang?'" in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
This is not simply a translation, though. Unlike the Greek and Norse myths which were consciously reworked over many hundreds of years into a form of coherence, the Arthurian cycle is complex, diverse, and frequently self-contradictory. Many of the writers themselves misunderstood their source material.
In his introduction, Green explains why and how he wove this tangled thread of tales into a single epic. The result is a masterpiece of its kind. This is not a book of fine descriptions, insightful character development or lyrical speeches. It is written in the epic style with the epic voice, and, in so doing, tells a story whose power is chiefly in the episodes and the figures, rather than in the realisation and the characters.
Roger Lancelyn Green introduced me to the Greek, Egyptian and Norse myths, and I owe him a lot. They opened a door to the original texts, which later came to play an important part in my education. But as I grew up I discovered that the original texts were better than the Green retellings. This, of course, is to be expected.
With Arthur, though, I have to say that Green's book really does work for me better than Mallory or Chretien de Troyes. In rereading it recently I realised why so much of Arthurian lore seemed second nature to me while studying middle-english at university - I had read it all before in this book.
I would recommend it to any child with an enquiring mind - it opened the Matter of Britain to me, and it will do so for them.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Dan Mersey, author of Arthur: King of the Britons on 25 July 2004
Format: Paperback
Many authors have dabbled with the stories of King Arthur, and of the many I have read, this book always sticks in my mind as one of the most entertaining reads.
A good place for anyone to start finding out about the legend of Arthur. Once you've finished this title, try to get hold of a copy of Rosemary Sutcliff's 'Sword at Sunset' for a completely different take on the story of Arthur. Both are highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. C. Morris on 11 Oct. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I ordered this to plug the gaps in my knowledge about King Arthur, and because it was touted in The Guardian as one of those books every kid should be introduced to. Well, I've got A level English and I found the first 80 pages or so pretty hard work. It's not the vocab; the stories are rather simplistic as there's the sense they've been handed down over the centuries by word of mouth. Rather, none of it is novelistic and it takes some getting used to. An important battle is related in a 50-word paragraph. It's a bit like reading the Iliad, where none of the characters really have personalities. A young lad is a young lad, an old hermit is an old hermit, a woman is a fair damsel. Some of the knights you can distinguish from the others; Percivale starts off as a sort of Tarzan figure in the wilds (but this is not really referenced again) but it's the braggard Sir Kay who stands out, for being a bully. But then you think, okay, how did he get to be a knight in the first place, with such behaviour?

The women are either insipid damsels, perfidious minxes or harpies. Often when a knight does ill, it turns out it's because a woman has put a spell on him. There's quite a sentimental mindset towards romance, the sense that the knight is off fighting his battles for his love back in the castle, rather than directly engaging with her.

It's a macho world, where one knight will attempt to knock the stuffing out of another, often for no apparent reason, just for bragging rights. Then the defeated knight must 'yield' ie give way, and pay homage to King Arthur, who rarely gets in a scrap himself. I suppose it's not too different to the turf warfare of the manor, and all that talk about 'respect'. The style of battle, jousting, really becomes quite repetitive however.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Danny on 9 Feb. 2004
Format: Paperback
i read this book and it started my whole interest in king arthur. since then i've gone on to look at the real life, historcial king arthur, and enjoy reading about him too. this book is a great read and fantastic introduction to the legend of king arthur.
if this book makes you want to go on to find out more about the historical king arthur, read "Legendary Warriors" and "The Discovery of King Arthur" when you've finished this.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The story of Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table is one of the most enduring of our legends and this book, with its beautiful black and white woodcut engravings, is probably the definitive interpretation of the story to give to a child to read for himself or herself, or be read aloud to at bedtime. I had it when I was 10 or 11 and have re-read it many times over very many years. It is a perfect book to be given to an imaginative child and its somewhat old-fashioned language and its excellent vocabulary will enrich a child's appreciation of good English literature without being in any way stuffy or prosaic.
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