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Kilvert's diary, 1870-1879: An illustrated selection Hardcover – 1992

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Bracken Books (1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091772257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091772253
  • Product Dimensions: 25.6 x 19.6 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 248,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Very Good, 1st Edition. Thick Square 8vo. xxviii, 288pp. Profuse coloured illustrations. Very good clean tight sound square, appears unopened and unread, no bookplate, inscriptions or marks of any kind, firmly held in joints and hinges, clean crisp corners and edges. In very good gilt lettered red laminated pictorial boards with original unclipped colour pictorial dustwrapper. A good addition for reader and scholar alike.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lucy on 6 July 2010
Format: Paperback
Lovely lyrical descriptions of rural England in a previous century, really takes you there. Anyone who enjoys walking in the countryside, or anyone who can no longer do so but likes imagining it, will enjoy this. Kilvert's attitude to little girls is a bit suspect, by today's standards his rapturous descriptions of them would certainly raise alarm bells in some. A real shame that his wife destroyed a lot of his work.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By I McKeown on 31 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
I found this a simply delightful read in which I was transported back to a world where people were as much a part of the landscape as observers of it. Today, with all the modern world's benefits of technology, health care, and comparative affluence, we have somehow lost our connection with the land, a vibrant living thing that Francis Kilvert so eloquently describes in his wonderfully engaging and descriptive diary. He draws for us detailed word-pictures of the skies in morning, at night, the colours and texture of light rising over the mountains, laneways heavy with woodbine, mallow and wild roses. The joy he infuses into meetings with familiar parishoners are lines deserving reading over and over again.

There is a naivity in his narrative that the modern, cynical ear might be suspicious of,but having said that, to the modern sensibility he seems at times to be a little too enchanted by the beauty of young girls. I cannot quite decide on the nature of his interest, perhaps our generations are so wide apart that it is hard to see through such blithe eyes. Maybe it is a case of 'to the pure all things are pure...' In any case, his warm acceptance and reception by old and young alike seem to point to a young man in love with the gift of life and delighting all those with whom he shares his friendship.

Having read his description of Clyro and district, I would love to visit and walk the hills and laneways. I hope they are as beautiful today.

One last thing. Although he later married, and tragically died straight after his honeymoon - before meeting his future wife he seems to fall in love inordinately often. Each seems to end hopelessly before his heart turns to another. The result is that he comes across as somewhat fickle?
Anyway, that does not affect his lyrical descriptions of nature which are a real pleasure. A lovely read leaving me wishing to get out and walk in the woods more often.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Martynrb on 19 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best historical diaries I've ever read on so many levels. It's interesting from a historical perspective alone, but there is so much more. Kilvert's own writing and descriptive skills are terrific - sometimes moving, sometimes funny, always captivating. Apparently he was an aspiring poet, and I'm not surprised judging by the way he describes scenes. He also shines through as a person, and on reading it's hard not to like him.

Yes, he doesn't hide his admiration for young girls, but it struck me as more naive than sinister. In fact one of the times he writes like this it seemed clear to me that he's yearning to be a parent and have a child of his own to love and nurture, rather than anything more disturbing.

This is just a selection from his diaries, and I'd like to read more but there seems to be a bewildering range of other selections, and, I'm sure, a lot of overlap between them. It's very frustrating that after he died various parts of his diaries were either censored or destroyed, and the biggest disappointment is that this becomes clear towards the end of the book, presumably after he had met his future wife who it seems got rid of anything referring to her. There are suddenly big gaps in the dates between entries, and it all starts to feel perfunctory and disjointed.

Thankfully, the majority of the book isn't like that and I feel enriched for having read it. I would love to have met Francis Kilvert.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. B. Richards on 7 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A diary by a village curate in the 1870s,.. must be rubbish, eh?
Don't believe a word of it. Full of gentle compassion, delightful anecdotes and warm humour. You feel as if you are there and know these characters.

Anyone who needs reassurance and a touch of whimsy would enjoy this little masterpiece.

Dr.Dick Richards [MD]
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bandauk on 28 July 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This fascinating look at the 19th century is one for the coffee table., for the occasional glimpse of a long lost world. Francis Kilvert, a curate in Herefordshire and mid-Wales was at home equally with 'the gentry' and the working country folk and his day to day stories of the people he met is gentle, delightful, sad and often amusing, albeit sometimes unwittingly.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dora on 7 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
had read excerpts of this book, the actual book was better than i hoped, would recommend to lovers of books like Cranford
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