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Kenobi (Star Wars: Legends) Mass Market Paperback – 29 Jul 2014


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 442 pages
  • Publisher: Lucas Books (29 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345546849
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345546845
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.6 x 17.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 118,226 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Shane - A tall island in a rising sycophant sea on 28 Aug 2013
Format: Hardcover
Over the last few years I have been continually disappointed by some of the Star Wars books that have come to market. I have found them to be too focused on the big players and too void of alternative viewpoints and perspective. After all, how many times can we read about Han, Luke, and Leia saving the galaxy from another super-weapon? But unlike those books, what Kenobi offers is a well balanced, fresh take on an old story that had plenty to offer but was never explored. Now, John Jackson Miller has opened the door to a Jedi's past that has had fans wondering about since the late 1970's.

We have all been wondering who exactly is Obi Wan Kenobi at his core, and what was his life like in the desolate wastelands of Tatooine as he watched over our young soon-to-be hero Luke Skywalker? So with those questions in mind lets walk through some of what the book has to offer, shall we?

Without providing too many spoilers lets first talk about the setting that Kenobi opens with. We know Tatooine to be a harsh environment that has little to nothing to offer its inhabitants, and most readers would find that to be a difficult stage to let the characters act upon. But what Tatooine offers is an opportunity to allow the harsh conditions to become a character in their own right. Tatooine itself is portrayed as evil villain bent on killing off those who would attempt to tame her, and at every opportunity she strikes out to slay her opponents. With duel suns beating down, and barren lands void of water, those who struggle against her must struggle tooth and nail to stay alive under her constant environmental bombardment. But where some would struggle against these inherently harsh conditions, others will strive and make the planet's weapons their own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ben on 31 Mar 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Everyone has given this a 5 star on Amazon.co.uk - easily pleased if you ask me or just liking the laid back relaxed novel? I know he's in the desert and frontier life isn't exactly quick but although the story was good and stuff happened there seemed to be a lack of threat for a Star Wars novel.
I like a threat and while I appreciate there is room for all types I wouldn't be rushing back to re read this in a hurry. too mundane, hum drum....

The one vital part, the one thing that would have made the story acceptable and made me love it would have been......
Qui Gon Jinn. Why oh Why did Mr Miller not stick him in? There is a meditation section at bthe end of a few of the chapters and they cried out for himj to answer all the way through, Kenobi could have made great strides in the force but seemed to be going backwards. ' A new teacher I have for you' Yoda told him before going into exile... Not much of one was he? Should have got a supply teacher in to cover him... A bit of internal banter, some training in learning to let go, some thoughts on selflessness as a way to achieve immortallity, all these things I would have hoped to see. But just Obi Wan's own internal dialogue seems the quick easy route and doesn't ask any / pose any awkward questions off the after life but left me feeling a bit let down. A bit of training in the force and development of even a Master like Kenobi would have been great reading and taken you out of the story for a few moments
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This novel starts with a view of the Sand People, who are on the verge of extinction. Then it switches to Dannar's Claim, a small retail centre for the "moisture farmers". There, people are barely aware that the Republic has fallen and seem untouched by the Clone War.

Obi-Wan turns up, just seeking supplies but feeling obliged to help those in need. He can reason he should do nothing while his main task is to guard Luke, but his human feelings keep getting in the way. And he is still devastated by his failure with Anakin and the fall of the Jedi.

The plot unfolds from there. Two of the major characters turn out to be very different from your first impression of them, and there is some ingenuity in the ending. A fair read.
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By Zoi on 13 Jun 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book is horrible, I cannot understand why everyone here loved it. it is titled 'Kenobi' but instead you search to find Obi-Wan among the pages. It's cliche stereotypical soap-opera drama where nothing is at it seems, with a good female human, a bad male human, and a good Tusken Raider. Yeap, that's true. The reader is forced to side emotionally with the Sand People. SERIOUSLY? Good Tusken? What were you thinking Miller? Oh, and teenagers, who, guess what, they get drunk, and fall in love with the wrong persons, and drive carelessly, and do risky things, but then they regret and return to the family shelter (he got that from Seventh Heaven, I assume). Furthermore the writer can't get over his OT OCDs so although the book starts with Obi-Wan arriving on Tatooine, aka Revenge of the Sith finale, Obi-Wan's personality is depicted as in New Hope, which takes place 20 years later. Because in Miller's mind Obi-Wan matured 20 years during a couple of days trip, and they stagnated as a personality for twenty years. Or simply he hates the prequels, because that's the Star Wars politically correct and proper. With regard to the writing style, BORING BORING BORING, Miller introduces the characters for almost half the book. On average, don't read it. Never. For no reason. Unless you suffer from insomnia.

PS: I have no complaints about the sellers, their service was very good.
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