Start reading Kea's Flight on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available
 

Kea's Flight [Kindle Edition]

John C. Ricker , Erika Hammerschmidt
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £14.39
Kindle Price: £2.90 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £11.49 (80%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £2.90  
Paperback £14.39  
Kindle Books Summer Sale
Kindle Summer Sale: Books from 99p
Browse over 600 titles from best-selling authors, including Neil Gaiman, John Grisham, Jeffrey Archer, Veronica Roth and Sylvia Day. >Shop now

Book Description

It's the 25th century, and humans have learned how to end unwanted pregnancies by removing and cryogenically freezing the embryos to save for later. But they never planned for how many there would be, or how much control people would want over their offspring's genetic makeup.

Kea was an exile before she was born. Grown from an embryo that was rejected for having autism-spectrum genes, she has been raised on a starship full of Earth's unwanted children. When a sudden discovery threatens their plan to find a home, Kea must join with other rejects to save the ship from its own insane government.

For more info about this book, go to: http://erikahammerschmidt.com/kea.php

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Page of Start over
This shopping feature will continue to load items. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

Product Description

About the Author

Erika Hammerschmidt was born in Minnesota and graduated from Augsburg College with two language majors and an art minor. She was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome at the age of 11, and has written Born on the Wrong Planet, a memoir about her childhood. Her husband John C. Ricker was born in Hawaii, received a diagnosis of Asperger's at the age of 24, and studied computer science before working in vacuum technology. They live in Minnesota with their parrot, Rain Man.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 738 KB
  • Print Length: 571 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1466240482
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Erika Hammerschmidt and John C. Ricker (3 Mar. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004QOAVW8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #585,189 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
I have fallen in love with this book, and already miss its adventure. The writing style flows like water, painting pictures that seem to float off the page. The main characters are interesting and deeply drawn, serious issues are bridged, suspense is held, and the book unravels to a suitably satisfactory and less than expected end.
A wide spectrum of readers should be as affected as I am, from Young Adult to "Seen-it-All" Veterans of a thousand books. We see the story through the eyes of a slowly maturing young girl who starts life in the deeps of autistic isolation, and follow her as she develops her savant skills in language and learns to interact with her peers. We are on a space-ship that is physically divided between a great number of variously handicapped children, living dormitory lives, and their controllers, the BGs, who "run" the ship. The novel seems to me to so well describe existence amongst the variously handicapped and marginalised, with their sometimes useful gifts. I am sure the insights and deep connections we feel with this bunch of "rejected humanity" would have felt less strong, if it were not for the fact that the authors have a particular closeness to autistic spectrum handicaps themselves.
This book is not just a must for those with an interest in science fiction, but should also be on the reading list of those who aren't naturally sympathetic to that genre. As a writer of speculative fiction I started reading with high expectations, otherwise I would not have chosen this one from a pile of hundreds. It was one of the best totally undirected reading decisions I have even made.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Auties vs. The Normals, in Space. 2 Nov. 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Not just the best Sci Fi I ever read, it is the best book I ever read, and compulsory reading for anyone blessed or cursed by autism or simply curious about what it is like to see the world in such a systematic way.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars SF at it's best 27 Aug. 2011
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
A whole new take on population and abortion issues, set in a dystopian future not so far from our own. The standpoint from which the book is written is that of a young girl growing up with a perceived disability in a work in which potentially disabled foetuses are grown to birth date in an uterine replicator, then shipped off to a new planet, growing up on the spaceship. Thought provoking, well written, and even witty. Well worth getting.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars There was never a dull moment! 1 April 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
I had high expectations for this book because of its blurb. It was even better than I thought. The characters were very realistic, and the entire story idea fitted together well. If you want an adventure story with very interesting characters with unique abilities on a spaceship then this is the one I recommend!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best, most original reads I've had in a long time! 18 July 2011
By Alexei Maxim Russell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Kea's Flight is one of those novels that depart from the typical. To
say it is a work of science fiction, set in a distant future where
space travel is the norm, is not to do the novel justice. True, that
is the setting and the general description of the novel, but apart
from that very general description, Kea's flight conforms to none of
the stereotypical plot conventions of the science fiction genre. It is a
pioneering departure in more ways than one. The atmosphere and the
future it creates is original and previously uncreated. And yet it
is also the first novel, complete, polished and written for the
mainstream, that deals with important social questions, including
mainstream attitude to those with Austism and Asperger's Syndrome.

If you are, like me, a fan of Isaac Asimov and his ability to create
alternate realities--so real that you feel like a tourist on holidays,
every time you pick up one of his books--then you will surely love
Kea's Flight.

Being my first exposure to Hammerschmidt, as a fiction writer, Asimov
is the writer whose style I have seen most resemblance. Much like
Asimov, Hammerschmidt and Ricker demonstrate their power to form
alternate realities with the complexity and attention to detail
necessary to allow the reader to suspend their disbelief. This gives
the novel such a "real" feel, that I find myself attracted, once
again, to the novel, after having read it. The setting and characters
were described so skillfully, and their reality is so tangible, that I
have found myself missing Kea and her friends, and feeling a powerful
urge to re-visit them in the "flying dustbin", which is their ship.

Hammerschmidt takes care to develop her characters, to a level of
breathing realism, and her dialog is strong and believable. Given
this, however, her first few chapters, much like Asimov's tend to be,
are involved with character development and setting the scene. So, if
you are the type of reader who requires immediate action and a great
deal of violence or earth-shattering explosions, to keep your
attention, you may prefer a book written with more violent action and
less character development. Whereas, if you are more a fan of
classical literature, then you will appreciate the author's
attention to detail. The pace of the book is leisurely, to begin
with, but it is more than compensated for, in the later chapters, when
the plot begins to quickly and impressively take form. Most good
dialogists, such as Hammerschmidt, lack skill with plot. But the plot
twists of Kea's Flight, in spite of their slow maturation, are
skillfully woven, to the extreme, and no mystery is left unsolved. At
some points in the novel, the resolution to a given plot point was so
unexpected and so clever that I couldn't help but laugh in wonderment.
This is something few authors have been able to do to me.

Kea's Flight is a pioneering work, in that it creates a new world,
unlike other science fiction worlds so far invented. That is, to my
mind, the clearest definition of "pioneering science fiction." But it
is also a pioneering work in that it is the first science fiction
novel, in my knowledge, to deal with questions of prejudice against
those with Autism, Asperger's Syndrome or any other diagnosis termed a
"disability" by mainstream culture. It puts this question into a
highly entertaining and well-written piece of fiction; it is written
by authors who, themselves, have been diagnosed on the Autism
Spectrum; it offers solutions to these social problems that leave you
wishing, at the end of the book, that you could be on the ship with
Kea and her friends, instead of this world, where these illogical
prejudices still prevail; it is not afraid to broach controversial
social issues, such as birth control and alternative lifestyle
choices.

For the pioneering reasons above, I rank Kea's Flight as one of the
most memorable reads I have had in a long time and I recommend it,
particularly to anyone who likes to explore new vistas of science
fiction writing, anyone interested in autism/asperger rights and
anyone who is a fan of Isaac Asimov, like myself.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Science Fiction 2 Jun. 2011
By Azamiryou - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
If classic science fiction is about imagining different futures and exploring their implications, then this is science fiction at its classic-est. The book tells an intriguing story set in a believable future where "abnormal" embryos are discarded but not killed. What is life like for "differently-abled" kids raised by criminals and robots, isolated from "normal" people?

It does a great job of revealing the humanity of autistics and other neuro-atypical people, showing both their strengths and weaknesses. I found this rare view really interesting, but also the source of my one complaint: parts of the book can seem a bit preachy about the value of such people to society.

The story itself is interesting and develops nicely, with background woven in as necessary. There's a lot more plot and character development than action, and by the end of the book, you feel like you really know the main characters. The authors manage the tension level expertly, gradually building to the climactic events. When an event happens as you expect it to, the characters expected it, too. And when something catches the characters off-guard, it's a surprise to the reader, too.

I highly recommend this book for fans of classic science fiction, and anyone open to a little better understanding of people on the autism spectrum.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A completely original book 11 Nov. 2011
By Rachel S - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
When I read the synopsis for Kea's Flight it definitely got me interested, but I had no idea what an awesome book it would turn out to be. And by awesome, I definitely mean awesome - this is already one of my favorite books of the year.

I'm not usually one for sci-if/futuristic space adventures, but there was just something about this novel that made it incredibly appealing. The characters were probably what did it for me, they were so well-drawn and felt very real. The characters are all teenagers who had been into space for having genes on the Autism Specter and I think it would have been easy to let them all blur together until they were all too similar. However, this is far from the case. The authors, Erika and John, have succeeded in creating relatable and flawed characters - Kea with her love of languages, Draz with his computer knowledge and emotional issues, Chris and his anger management troubles. I could go on forever, but the point is, I haven't read characters such as these in a long time.

The plot was also great, with just the right amount of dialogue and action. There was a lot to wrap my head around in this novel, but the authors succeeded in creating a world that was believable and fairly easy to grasp. Some of it is quite daunting - for example, the computer knowledge involved - but I felt that it was all explained extremely well. There are a lot of ethical issues tackled in Kea's Flight, and the authors did a great job with coming coming up with unique perspectives. The novel really made me think about a lot of things, and I loved all the differing opinions on some very real issues.

Overall, I honestly don't think Kea's Flight could have been better. It's a self-published novel, but it certainly doesn't read like one - I only managed to pick up a couple of spelling/grammar errors. For any 500 page book that's an achievement! With richly drawn characters, and a plot to rival many of the novels out there at the moment, you really don't want to miss this book. I highly recommended Kea's Flight.

(I received this novel free from the author for review. This in no way affected my review.)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Sci-Fi Tour of the Asperger Spectrum 17 Feb. 2012
By Fritz R. Ward - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I usually do not have the patience for novels and prefer reading popular science and travel literature. But when the authors offered me a review copy of this book, I found I could not turn it down. The prospect of heroes diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome in a science fiction setting was too good to pass up. We all know people with Asperger's but rarely think of them as central characters in a book, or in our own lives, for that matter. I spent 3 weeks reading (and re-reading) the novel, but it was well worth my time.

In the 25th century humans have done away with abortion, but now are removing and freezing an unwanted fetus. Reasons for doing so vary, but neo natal genetic testing and social pressure encourages parents to get rid of children who are not "optimal." In addition, Earth now has a single dictatorial government, based on loosely right wing religious principles, and it is easy for them to simply send away children who will not readily fit into society. Karen Anderson, a language savant, born with tendency towards autism spectrum disorders, has never lived on earth. Her entire life has been spent on a ship she calls the "flying dustbin" under the care of domineering and paternalistic BGs (benevolent guardians). Feeling isolated and routinely punished for minor violations of unwritten ship rules, Karen eventually finds other passengers with similar backgrounds, including Draz, a computer savant, with whom she forms a romantic bond. This small cluster of passengers quickly discover that the ship is not very well constructed, and the planet they are being sent to is not capable of sustaining life. They hatch a plot to try to save themselves and the other passengers.

The plot of the book is fairly well constructed, though I found the motivation of the central villain in the novel to be a little inadequate. I was also a little disappointed in a computer character, whom I alternatively thought should have been given an either greater role or toned down. But these are minor criticisms of an otherwise well written novel. These cavils also miss the bigger point of the book, for the novel is really a vehicle for the author(s) to introduce readers to what people with Aspergers Syndrome feel and experience. Indeed, the central characters of the novel are clearly the authors themselves, and the social struggles they describe in the context of the novel are all too real experiences for many people with Aspergers. At times the novel almost became didactic, and difficult to follow. Still, the characters were all very realistic, precisely because they were so typical of what people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) regularly experience. I know a little about that, and am sad to say that I recognized a lot of myself in one of the less pleasant characters who surrounds Karen Anderson, the eternally pessimistic (and combative) Chris.

All too often fiction assumes characters who are "normal" but face the everyday challenges of life in unique ways; think "Are you there God, It's me, Margaret." The characters in science fiction are for the most part similar: very like us, but responding to challenging situations in a futuristic setting. Only rarely do we see people society would label as disabled playing a leading role in science fiction or fantasy. It may be that the reason the X-men, for example, are so popular is because they include a hero confined to a wheel chair (to say nothing of that rarest type of human being, a nationalistic Canadian, but I digress). It's refreshing to read a novel where characters with Aspergers are at the heart of the action. I hope I can see more fiction like this, with less of an emphasis on the didactic purpose for doing so.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful SF/Speculative Fiction Read. Loved it. 25 Jan. 2012
By Mr. Richard Lw Bunning - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have fallen in love with this book, and already miss its adventure. The writing style flows like water, painting pictures that seem to float off the page. The main characters are interesting and deeply drawn, serious issues are bridged, suspense is held, and the book unravels to a suitably satisfactory and less than expected end.
A wide spectrum of readers should be as affected as I am, from Young Adult to "Seen-it-All" Veterans of a thousand books. We see the story through the eyes of a slowly maturing young girl who starts life in the deeps of autistic isolation, and follow her as she develops her savant skills in language and learns to interact with her peers. We are on a space-ship that is physically divided between a great number of variously handicapped children, living dormitory lives, and their controllers, the BGs, who "run" the ship. The novel seems to me to so well describe existence amongst the variously handicapped and marginalised, with their sometimes useful gifts. I am sure the insights and deep connections we feel with this bunch of "rejected humanity" would have felt less strong, if it were not for the fact that the authors have a particular closeness to autistic spectrum handicaps themselves.
This book is not just a must for those with an interest in science fiction, but should also be on the reading list of those who aren't naturally sympathetic to that genre. As a writer of speculative fiction I started reading with high expectations, otherwise I would not have chosen this one from a pile of hundreds. It was one of the best totally undirected reading decisions I have even made.
There are a lot of social and philosophical issues covered in this story, from prejudice to individual rights, from the needs of society to equality of opportunity and the future of mankind. There are also many of the more familiar scientific and technological ingredients that are the grist of SF writing. All are blended into a plausible adventure that takes place on a cheaply produced tin can of a spacecraft, run with variously obsolete equipment, as it powers towards a predetermined destination. This is a destiny that needs avoiding if our unlikely crew and passengers are going to have much of a future. A thick fog of expectant failure grabs at us as we follow the story of this unlikely bunch of discordant friends, and get glimpses of their tenuous, unidentified supporters. So many varying emotional strands often weaken, but sometimes strengthen, any hope of survival. We have love, hate, paranoia, fear, pain, inferiority complexes, totalitarian venom, distrust and blind support all rearing their heads in a threatening to be tragic soup. And of course, with having so many classical elements of science fiction, even artificial "intelligence" raises its electronic head.
I really hope there is a sequel to this fine novel, as I really can't abide the idea of missing out on the future adventures of Karen Anderson and Zachary Drazil.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category