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Justice League Volume 2: The Villain's Journey HC (The New 52) Hardcover – 12 Feb 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (12 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401237649
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401237646
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 1.3 x 26.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 125,771 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"Johns and Lee are delivering what we wanted all along--our favorite characters in the same place, playing off one another and showing us how they compare and contrast."--"Newsarama " "Geoff Johns is crafting a new villain worthy of the great JLA villains of old. Lee still delivers some of the most sleek and powerful heroes in the industry."--"IGN" "Jim Lee is who he always is--the standard bearer of the industry's artwork. When one imagines in the abstract what a modern comic book should look like, the default setting is Jim Lee."--"Craveonline "

About the Author

Geoff Johns is an award-winning writer and one of the most popular contemporary comic book writers today. Johns is the author of The "New York Times" bestselling graphic novels "Aquaman: The Trench, Blackest Night, Green Lantern: Sinestro Corps War, ""Justice League: Origin, Superman: Brainiac "and "Batman: Earth One "which hit #1 on the bestseller list. He is also known for transforming "Green Lantern" into one of the most critically and commercially successful franchises in comics. Johns was born in Detroit and studied media arts, screenwriting, and film at Michigan State University. After moving to Los Angeles, he became an assistant to Richard Donner, director of "Superman: The Movie." He and his mentor Donner later co-wrote "Superman: Last Son "featuring the return of General Zod. Johns has written for various other media, including episodes of "Smallville, Arrow" and "Adult Swim's Robot Chicken," for which he was nominated along with his co-writers for an Emmy. He is the Chief Creative Officer of DC Entertainment and resides in Los Angeles, California. Jim Lee is a renowned comic book artist and the Co-Publisher of DC Entertainment. Prior to his current post, Lee served as Editorial Director, where he oversaw WildStorm Studios and was also the artist for many of DC Comics' bestselling comic books and graphic novels, including ALL STAR BATMAN AND ROBIN, THE BOY WONDER, BATMAN: HUSH, and SUPERMAN: FOR TOMORROW. He also serves as the Executive Creative Director for the DC Universe Online (DCUO) massively multiplayer action game from Sony Online Entertainment (SOE).

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"STAAAY!" "AWWAAY!" "STAYAWAAYY!" screech the toothy horrors that burst off of the first page of the second Justice League book. It serves as a not-so-subtle warning to potential readers that this volume of Justice League is pretty diabolical and might best be avoided. As a fan of the first book, I was surprised to see how low the quality of writing had dipped and disappointed that by the second book the magic had all but gone. However, like the JL in the story, I hacked my way through the monsters and delved deeper into "The Villain's Journey", a confusing story about nothing.

The villain in question is Mr Graves, a bestselling author of a book about the Justice League with an interest in the supernatural. After he and his family are saved from Darkseid and his minions by the JL (see the first volume), his family become sick from exposure to Darkseid's omega energy and die. Warped with sickness and grief he seeks out an unholy power in the uncharted mountains of Asia to reunite him with his loved ones and destroy those who had taken them from him - the Justice League!

This book gets off to a really slow start. The first issue is the prologue to the "Villain's Journey" and frankly this could've been two pages instead of a whole issue, two pages added to the first chapter of the story for all the relevance it has to the arc. The second issue is by far the worst though. This is the Green Arrow crossover that sits awkwardly in between the prologue and first chapter of the main storyline. Green Arrow wants to join the Justice League SO BAD! He follows them everywhere, whining "aw, c'mon guys! Let me join the club!" etc. For an entire issue. He is so annoying and needy!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Stranger on 18 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When reading the other reviews for justice league I find myself being more negative them most, this is not because I am unimpressed by the series it's just that there are enough faults that keep it from greatness no matter how much good there is.

So what are these faults, this is suppose to be five years on from the first volume but no real development can be seen in the members of the league I couldn't help but wonder that after five years they cannot seem to operate together without someone doing something half assed or stupid to put the mission in danger, also the fact is we have missed five years of the team being together (and the entry and exit of the Martian Manhunter) that backstory leaves a gap of understanding that make getting to know these heroes as a team difficult, the advent of A.R.G.U.S in this story as well doesn't help, did the justice league really need a S.H.I.E.L.D like organisation in it, I know it's more realistic and bureaucracy surrounds everything in life it just feels like too much of a distraction, the main storyline is a plus point linking back into the origin of the league and also focusing on the problems when you are in the public eye and adored what can happen when you don't live up to that godhood it also does well at showing how villains can be born the same way heroes can but this is once again spoiled by the ending being all too easy even after all the trouble the villain has caused, also Cyborg character development is minimal, as the only member of the team without their own title his character should be explored more then the others unfortunately it is not, his struggles with his man/machine nature are not well addressed even when they are it doesn't really lead anywhere.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Squirr-El TOP 50 REVIEWER on 20 Jun. 2013
Format: Hardcover
These are still not the characters we are looking for, and despite the characterisation and interaction being handled expertly, I didn't feel any particular attachment to them. It is still a good book, showing the slow (five years!) building up of the team, dropping hints to past adventures and team members (the Martian Manhunter from Mars is now a hostile ex-member), but it is five years that we haven't experienced, and the familiarity is still not there - unfortunately, these are still `new' characters that we are expected to accept at face value.
The story is lower-key that the world-threatening origin story-line, with the threats being at a more personal level, despite threatening the very existence of the Justice League, and arising from events in the origin. Unfortunately again, the characterisation has carried straight on from the origin story, despite it being set five years in the past - you'd think they'd have matured a bit since then. The first story introduces us to Colonel Steve Trevor, who is fleshed-out during the course of the storyline, as he heads up A.R.G.U.S., the organisation which liaises between the US government and the JLA - the acronym is shown in full on a shoulder-flash, so you need to pay attention if you want to know what it stands for. The second story features the Green Arrow trying to get into the JLA, pushed by the government, but resisted by the league, who flashback a bit to another former member that proved troublesome - the Martian Manhunter - while also building up the threat that manifests itself in the four-part `Villain's Journey' that follows, which reveals some of the personal troubles of the main characters, including Steve Trevor, before one of the big guns eventually quits, and a budding romance is possibly established.
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