July 1914: Countdown to War and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £0.01
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
July 1914: Countdown to W... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Greener_Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

July 1914: Countdown to War Paperback – 6 Feb 2014

29 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.98
£3.12 £1.40
£9.98 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

July 1914: Countdown to War + The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 + The War that Ended Peace: How Europe abandoned peace for the First World War
Price For All Three: £27.82

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in July 1914: Countdown to War for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Icon Books Ltd (6 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848316577
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848316577
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 3 x 13.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 33,311 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'A work of meticulous scholarship ... McMeekin's description of the details of life in the European capitals - small events that influenced great decisions - makes July 1914 irresistible.' -- Roy Hattersley Times 'A genuinely exciting, almost hour-by-hour account of the terrible month when Europe's diplomats danced their continent over the edge and into the abyss.' -- Nigel Jones BBC History Magazine 'Sean McMeekin's splendid July 1914 unravels all the shenanigans, bluffs and bunglings by which Europe's leaders and diplomats turned a minor murder in a Balkans backwater into total war ... There are scenes in July 1914 that linger long after the cover is closed.' -- John Lewis-Stempel Sunday Express 'McMeekin shows us precisely why the conflict happened ... [he] tells these stories with clarity and skill, drawing expert portraits of all the characters involved.' -- Keith Lowe Mail on Sunday 'Learned, punchy and enjoyable ... the book reads like a crime drama.' -- Christopher Clark London Review of Books 'A refreshingly original counterpoint to the traditional focus' -- Bronwen Maddox Prospect 'A shocking history, told with edgy, angry authority.' -- Iain Finlayson Saga Magazine 'Sean McMeekin, in July 1914, [offers a] new perspective ... McMeekin has chosen the zoom lens. He opens with a crisp but vivid reconstruction of the double murder in the sunshine of Sarajevo, then concentrates entirely on unraveling the choreography day by day.' -- Harold Evans New York Times Book Review '[A] detailed account of the events and decisions that marked the road to war' Times Higher Education '[McMeekin] has ... literary and historical skill to make this a page-turning read.' Literary Review [A] superbly researched political history of the weeks between the assassination of Austria's Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the beginning of World War I... McMeekin's work is a fine diplomatic history of the period, a must-read for serious students of WWI, and a fascinating story for anyone interested in modern history.' -- Publishers Weekly Publishers Weekly 'McMeekin's chronicle of these weeks in July 1914: Countdown to War is almost impossible to put down... [McMeekin] delivers a punchy and riveting narrative of high politics and diplomacy over the five weeks after Sarajevo, more or less day by day, dwelling on small groups of decision-makers in and between the various capitals, and their interactions, by turns measured, perplexed, cordial, artful, angry, even tearful.' -- RJW Evans The New York Review of Books '[A] thoroughly rewarding account that spares no nation regarding the causes of World War I... McMeekin delivers a gripping, almost day-by-day chronicle of the increasingly frantic maneuvers of European civilian leaders who mostly didn't want war and military leaders who had less objection.' Kirkus Reviews 'Sean McMeekin is establishing himself as a-or even the-leading young historian of modern Europe. Here he turns his gifts to the outbreak of war in July 1914 and has written another masterpiece.' -- Norman Stone author of World War Two: A Short History 'Alluding to historical controversies, McMeekin ably delivers what readers demand from a WWI-origins history: a taut rendition of the July 1914 crisis.' -- Booklist 'Blending scholarly research with a breezy and descriptive writing style, McMeekin makes a reader feel like a firsthand witness to the key events of that fateful summer ... a primer for today's diplomats on how not to allow a small event to spiral out of control into a major war.' Columbus Dispatch 'A fascinating account' -- Giles MacDonogh author of Prussia '[McMeekin's] research skills are obviously admirable and his sources are impressive ... this is an excellent account of the days between the Sarajevo assassination and the outbreak of the First World War.' The European Royal History Journal 'This is a meticulously researched and vividly written reconstruction of the decisions that led to war in July 1914. McMeekin captures the human drama of this fateful month and offers a provocative assessment of the different players' moral responsibility.' -- James Sheehan, author of 'Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe' 'Winners write the histories, so wars are misunderstood. Sean McMeekin takes a wider stance to get a fresh angle of vision on The Great War, and casts all war-making in a new light.' -- Charles Hill, Diplomat in Residence at Yale University, Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and author of 'Trial of a Thousand Years: World Order and Islamism' 'Sean McMeekin has given us a riveting and fast-paced account of some of the most important diplomatic and military decisions of the 20th century. He depicts with chilling clarity the confusion, the incompetence, and the recklessness with which Europe's leaders went to war in that fateful summer. Any understanding of the world we inhabit today must begin with an examination of the events of July 1914. McMeekin provides his readers with a balanced and detailed analysis of the events that gave birth to the modern age.' -- Michael Neiberg, author of 'The Blood of Free Men'

About the Author

Sean McMeekin's books include The Berlin-Baghdad Express, The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power (Penguin/Allen Lane) and The Russian Origins of the First World War (Harvard University Press). He lives in Istanbul with his wife, Nesrin, and their daughter, Ayla.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BenCantDance on 14 July 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An excellent and gripping account of the slide into war following the assassination of Franz Ferdinand. I had always failed to understand just how the one lead to the other, and this book details it all clearly, although never in so much detail that you get bogged down. The author has done his research very well, and knows exactly when to give the reader the nitty-gritty, and when to simply provide a précis.

Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jilted John on 3 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a quite brilliant book. Rather than looking at the wider causes of the war which had been unfolding for years, it begins with the assassination in Sarajevo and then looks in detail at the events over the following five weeks. In many cases a chapter will concentrate on what happened on a single day, and sometimes you get the feel of having an hour-by-hour commentary.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Strephon on 10 Jun. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this an eminently readable book which took the reader day by day in detail through the month leading up to WW1. A most enjoyable and informative read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan F. Vernon on 21 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Writing an essay on why Britain when to war in 1914 this was one of several 'must reads' - you can read enough on the subject to enjoy his take and his nuanced view, and then either agree or in my case not quite concur. Reading original documents in the Annika Mombauer collections makes you realise that no historian can ever get it right, though between them Sean McMeekin, Christopher Clarke and Hew Strachan are fairly close to the truth - aren't they?
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Mooney on 14 Aug. 2014
Format: Paperback
One of the best books on the period I have ever read. This will make you think and may cause people to alter their views on some of the main players! I could not recommend this book highly enough.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
105 of 135 people found the following review helpful By Richard Poole on 4 July 2013
Format: Hardcover
McMeekin is right in one respect. All the big powers made disastrously bad decisions during the July crisis. Most readers will go along with that conclusion but McMeekin is a revisionist. His book forcefully lays out why it was Russia that surpassed the others in the wilful badness of its decisions and Russia is to blame for the outbreak of the war.

This is strongly reflected in his various comments on the leaders in the driving seat in each of the three most closely involved powers. You can summarise them by saying Berchtold (Austria) is a fool, Bethmann (Germany) is a tragic fool, and Sazonov (Russia) is a cunning fool.

Whoever you think is to blame, it is Russia that reacted to the decision of Austria-Hungary, fully supported without qualification by Germany, to destroy Serbia as an independent state and give large parts of it to its neighbours.

McMeekin is saying it was right for Austria-Hungary and Germany to do this, and in Germany's case it was deceived into allowing the situation to get out of hand, and let Russia, encouraged by the French, plunge Europe into war.

The author supports his analysis with a rather large number of dubious accounts and blatant errors. Examples are given below.

## Bethmann's knowledge and state of mind when he and the Kaiser met the Austrian envoys at Potsdam on 6 July [p100, p104]

McMeekin portrays Bethmann, the German Chancellor, as not being in touch with what was going on when the Austrian ambassador called on the Kaiser at Potsdam to get German support. He arrived at the last minute probably too exhausted from his trip to perceive how acute the situation was.

This contradicts what other historians say.
Read more ›
12 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrea Potter on 19 Nov. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent analysis of the politics that lead up to the outbreak of war. A little complicated at times but well worth sticking with.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By margie on 24 April 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good to read a book which flows and also tells the facts dispassionately. Amazing how arrogant certain people of a certain were to those whom they thought of as expendable
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback