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Product details

  • Audio CD: 8 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; Unabridged edition (24 Sep 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141044101
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141044101
  • Product Dimensions: 13.4 x 3 x 13.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,346,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nick Hornby was born in 1957, and is the author of six novels, High Fidelity, About a Boy, How To Be Good, A Long Way Down (shortlisted for the Whitbread Award)Slam and Juliet, Naked. He is also the author of Fever Pitch, a book on his life as a devoted supporter of Arsenal Football Club, and has edited the collection of short stories Speaking with the Angel. He has written a book about his favourite songs, 31 Songs, and his reading habits,The Complete Polysyllabic Spree. In 2009 he wrote the screenplay for the film An Education. Nick Hornby lives and works in Highbury, north London.



Product Description

Review

Hornby writes with a funny, fresh voice which skewers male and female foibles with hilarious accuracy (Guardian )

He should write for England (Observer )

Hornby is a fine writer, swift and pointed, with a lighter, more mischievous heart than he lets on, and more sympathy for the devil than he admits to (New York Magazine )

About the Author

Nick Hornby was born in 1957. He is the author of five previous novels, High Fidelity, About a Boy, How To Be Good, A Long Way Down (shortlisted for the Whitbread Award) and Slam; three works of non-fiction, Fever Pitch (winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award), 31 Songs (shortlisted for the National Books Critics Circle Award) and The Complete Polysyllabic Spree; and a Pocket Penguin book of short stories, Otherwise Pandemonium. He has also edited two anthologies, My Favourite Year and Speaking With the Angel. In 1999 he was awarded the E. M. Forster Award by the American Academy of Arts and Letters and in 2002 he won the W. H. Smith Award for Fiction. He recently wrote the screenplay for a film, An Education. Nick Hornby lives and works in Highbury, north London.

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Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Jan 2011
Format: Paperback
My daughter bought this for my birthday last year, to add to the shelf containing all of Nick Hornby's books that I've been reading and re-reading over the years. So I'm a fan (which fits in with the subject of this tale), but not - I think - an uncritical one. The story has a promising start as we're introduced to Duncan - the latest in a long line of Hornby's feckless middle-aged male heroes, with too much money and time on their hands to prevent them from developing slightly obsessive relationships with music, films and books, whilst paying less attention to the people around them (in this case, Annie, for whom the adjective 'long-suffering' seems to have been specifically coined). The original version of this character was High Fidelity's Rob, but Hornby still knows enough about him (and his readers) to provide little shocks of recognition: in particular on p21, when Duncan comes back from his holiday with Annie and only picks out his Amazon parcels, leaving the rest of the mail for Annie to deal with, I started to wonder if Hornby had installed a webcam in my own house.

In spite (or maybe because) of being able to relate uncomfortably to Duncan, I didn't feel the book maintained its hold on me. The main story is promising: Duncan's obsession with Tucker Crowe, an obscure, retired American singer-songwriter and Annie's attempts to find meaning in her relationship with him, in her life, and in the town they inhabit ("the North's answer to a question nobody asked"). This is promising stuff, and there are interesting digressions on the nature of art, fandom, relationships, parenthood and the influence of the Internet on communications along the way.
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Oct 2009
Format: Hardcover
Obviously there's deep irony in posting a review of a new book by one of my favorite authors when one of the key elements of the book's plot is an adoring fan's online review of a new album...but oh well. I have to admit, I was a little leery when I cracked the spine of Hornby's latest novel. After setting the bar ridiculously high with his first two books, Fever Pitch and High Fidelity, Hornby has continued on to produce a series of engaging, but not quite as brilliant successors. And it had to be said that his last adult novel, A Long Way Down, was distinctly underwhelming. Fortunately, this new book represents a return to form, as well as being a work that speaks to an older (though probably not wiser) audience than his previous work.

The mechanics of the story are relatively simple: Annie and Duncan are a cohabitating couple approaching 40 as they eke out moderate existences as a small museum director and college instructor, respectively. They've been together for 15 years, and about the only thing keeping them together is inertia and the lack of prospects in the seaside cultural wasteland they live in (a fictional town on England's eastern coast, somewhere near Hull -- roughly the American equivalent of a small, tacky, Jersey shore town). Duncan is obsessed with an obscure American singer-songwriter from the '80s who inexplicably walked away from music one day, and spends a great deal of his time and energy running a website devoted to the mysterious Tucker Crowe. One day, a "new" Tucker Crowe album is released (it's actually the demos from a concept album beloved by his fans), and Duncan and Annie's differing reactions to it trigger a chain of events which brings the reclusive ex-musician into their lives in the flesh.
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84 of 98 people found the following review helpful By Robert Machin on 25 Sep 2009
Format: Hardcover
I really like Nick Hornby. I think he's an astute commentator and critic, I think he has a great take on the modern condition, and for what it's worth I'm pretty sure he's one of the good guys too.

Sadly, I've come to the conclusion that, notwithstanding the decent fist he made of `High Fidelity' (not exactly a great novel, but a damned good read all the same) and most particularly 'About a Boy' (his best fiction to date, and, my guess is, the best he will ever write) he's actually not much of a novelist. Having ploughed my way through `How to be Good' (which worked well in parts and was at least philosophically intriguing), `A Long Way Down', which was just plain awful, and now this, I'm thinking that maybe it's time to give it up and stick to what he's good at - writing funny and perceptive stuff about music, the arts and modern life (which he does better than just about anyone I know). I mean, really - go read `A Long Way Down' and then read `31 Songs' or `The Complete Polysyllabic Spree' and tell me I'm not right.

So here's what I think about `Juliet, Naked `: it's not a bad book and if you picked it up before a flight (assuming the horrible chick-lit-style cover didn`t put you off) it would probably distract you adequately for a few hours. It`s not especially funny, or sad, or emotional, or exciting or really especially anything but it moves along at an adequate pace from page to page, eventually reaching a not especially satisfying conclusion. And, you know, it's only 245 pages, so it's not like a great investment is required from the reader.

It's about music, which Nick knows a lot about - specifically, about Tucker Crowe, former musician and newest addition to Hornby's lengthening gallery of feckless wasters - and the nature of art, creativity and fandom.
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