Start reading Judgment at Tokyo: The Japanese War Crimes Trials on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available
 

Judgment at Tokyo: The Japanese War Crimes Trials [Kindle Edition]

Tim Maga

Kindle Price: £20.64 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £20.64  
Hardcover --  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: Up to 70% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Book Description

In the years since the Japanese war crimes trials concluded, the proceedings have been coloured by charges of racism, vengeance and guilt. In this controversial book, Tim Maga contends that in the trials good law was practiced and evil did not go unpunished. The defendents ranged from lowly Japanese Imperial Army privates to former prime ministers. Since they did not represent a government for which genocide was a policy pursuit, their cases were more difficult to prosecute than those of Nazi war criminals. In contrast to Nuremberg, the efforts in Tokyo, Guam and other locations throughout the Pacific received little attention by the Western press. Once the Cold War began, America needed Pacific allies and the atrocities committed by Japanese soldiers throughout the 1930s and early 1940s were rarely mentioned. The trials were described as phony justice and "Japan bashing". Keenan and his compatriots adopted criminal court tactics and established precedents in the conduct of war crimes trials that still stand. Maga reviews the context for the trials, recounts the proceedings, and concludes that they were, in fact, decent examples of American justice and fairy play.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2462 KB
  • Print Length: 240 pages
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky (11 Jan. 2001)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XKOEQ0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #894,311 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 0.0 out of 5 stars  0 reviews
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Japanese War Crimes trials placed in historical context 18 Feb. 2001
By "markmcg@webtv.net" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Tim Maga has done it again. The nation's premier scholar of US-East Asian relations has joined John Dower and Herbert Bix in considering postwar Japan. This book rises immediately to the top rank of studies of its specific subject and of the post-World War II period in general. The book is admittedly not an encylopedic review of the trials, although those who are searching for descriptions of the grotesque actions of Japanese war criminals will not be disappointed here. Rather the book's strength is in its ability to show how the trials played a crucial role in other important developments of the time. Dr. Maga's approach thus sheds new light on MacArthur's occupation government and its relationship with the State Department, the bifurcated view of war criminals in Japan itself as both villains and heros, and the developing Cold War in general and the Korean War in particular. The final chapter adds provocative insights into the legacy of the Japanese war crimes trials in light of the ongoing debate of how to deal with war crimes in the present day. Dr. Maga's research is impeccable and includes several heretofore unused sources. Out of this he has fashioned a book which must be considered by anyone plowing this field in the future. Expect to see this book receiving major awards later this year.
30 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Passing This Judgment 23 Jan. 2002
By hist - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Tim Maga utterly fails to develop a coherant argument for his thesis (that, although critics abound, the Tokyo Trials were carried forth in the spirit of justice and fairness). Since I started the book as a skeptic of his argument, I was interested in what primary materials would be cited as well as how thorough of a job Maga would do.
The book follows no organization and the text itself is filled with tangental tid-bits of irrellevant information that serves no purpose except just to break any flow that a chapter might had. He focuses too heavily on the transcripts of the courtroom itself, instead of looking at how the trials proceeded according to a script written from outside sources. He concludes every chapter by returning to his thesis, while the reader is left wondering how such a claim can be made after what they have just read.
In all fairness, the task that Maga set out to do (to answer the critics of the trial) is a massive one. There are extremely well written histories of the Trial that take in-depth looks into how SCAP, MacArthur, even the Imperial House meddled in the affairs of the trial.....or reviewing the dissenting arguments of a few of the judges who saw the Trial first hand. These are all glossed over in a few paragraphs so that Maga can return to repeating his thesis that the allies and prosecutors were inspired only by justice/fairness.
To read a very small amount of material on the Trial, I suggest reading Dower's Embracing Defeat. Although not without folley of its own, his chapters on the trial give a better and in-depth glimpse into the Tokyo Trial.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent study of largely misunderstood trial 27 Jan. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Maga does an excellent job of weeding through post-war propaganda and revisionist history to reveal a trial which was much more fair and effective than most scholars have argued. Maga carefully documents the Japanese attempts to turn world opinion against the trials and, through various machinations, detract from the criminal acts of those on trial. He also reveals the degree to which American politics, now focused on the Soviet threat and anxious to shore up Japanese support against Communism,, influenced the trial and brought about lenient sentences for war criminals, and in some cases (Emperor Hirohito, especially), no trial or punishment at all. An excellent read!
14 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not well-written or cohesive... 29 Oct. 2003
By K. L Sadler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I read the other reviewers...I usually do that with historical books because of the importance of those who may have a different perspective than someone like me who is coming into this particular arena of history with no background. I have read a lot about the Nuremberg Trials, much about German aggression, and very little about Japan. Growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, with my grandfather a commander in the Navy, I grew up with a sense of pride, and also wanting to know more about the time in which he served, and shortly after when my father also served (Korea). But I also got snippets of information from other readings concerning the very unfair treatment of the Japanese in the U.S. when their homes were raided and they were placed in concentration camps. So of course, I was curious when I came across this small book.
For historians and social study teachers, this might be a good book to read for background. Some people write and make history come alive again. Others write history, and most people would put this book back down because it is so dry, and is written with an evident bias that is not always backed up with support. I guess I would have to read the actual transcripts of the trial because this particular one apparently did not gain the attention of the world. Those who came in close contact with Japanese atrocities such as China, Australia, and most importantly, the Phillipines definitely had a different viewpoint then most of the Americans involved in the Trials. MacArthur and the main judge, Keenan, evidently controlled quite a bit of the trials...who came to trial, who did not, who was punished, what the punishments were. I had a problem in that mentions were made of the atrocities, but unlike the very well-known Final Solution, Japanese atrocities were not as much fodder for the newspapers. Heaven only knows why.
All countries have time periods in their histories for which they should feel shame, including the U.S. Wisdom is when those countries recognize and address those problems, and many of the Japanese did incredible things such as one sobbing man turning in his own son for almost certain capital punishment for killing an entire Burmese town. If only more of us would show the courage that older man did in doing this, our world would be a better place.
I am going to read more on this area/trials, because Maga whetted my appetite, but didn't satisfy it. Whether our side was fair in their judgements, whether the Emperor should have paid a higher price (I think MacARthur handled this one right)...is probably up to those who read these books to make that judgement. It is a part of our world history, and Japan has certainly come a long way from their militarism of that time. Nationalism and militarism is scary in any form, no matter which country is involved. We've seen way too many nationalistic-caused atrocities in AFrica, Serbia, Germany, etc. I can't help think but of some words that said "Judge not, lest ye be judge..."
Karen Sadler,
Science Education,
University of Pittsburgh
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Japanese War Crimes trials placed in historical context 18 Feb. 2001
By "markmcg@webtv.net" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Tim Maga has done it again. The nation's premier scholar of US-East Asian relations has joined John Dower and Herbert Bix in considering postwar Japan. This book rises immediately to the top rank of studies of its specific subject and of the post-World War II period in general. The book is admittedly not an encylopedic review of the trials, although those who are searching for descriptions of the grotesque actions of Japanese war criminals will not be disappointed here. Rather the book's strength is in its ability to show how the trials played a crucial role in other important developments of the time. Dr. Maga's approach thus sheds new light on MacArthur's occupation government and its relationship with the State Department, the bifurcated view of war criminals in Japan itself as both villains and heros, and the developing Cold War in general and the Korean War in particular. The final chapter adds provocative insights into the legacy of the Japanese war crimes trials in light of the ongoing debate of how to deal with war crimes in the present day. Dr. Maga's research is impeccable and includes several heretofore unused sources. Out of this he has fashioned a book which must be considered by anyone plowing this field in the future. Expect to see this book receiving major awards later this year.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category