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Judge Dredd: Complete Case Files, Vol. 2 Paperback – 2 Feb 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: 2000 AD Graphic Novels (2 Feb 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904265839
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904265832
  • Product Dimensions: 18.7 x 2.6 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Pat Mills is the creator and first editor of 2000 AD. For the Galaxy's Greatest Comic, he is the writer and co-creator of ABC Warriors, Finn, Flesh, Nemesis the Warlock, Slaine, M.A.C.H 1, Harlem Heroes and Savage. Outside 2000 AD he is the writer and co-creator of the long-running classic anti-war story Charley's War, as well as Marshal Law. He has also written for the Batman, Star Wars and Zombie World series for the US market. Currently Mills is writing the best-selling series Requiem -- Vampire Knight for Editions Nickel of France with artist Olivier Ledroit, and a spin-off series, Claudia -- Vampire Knight, with artist Frank Tacito. Two further French series are in production. John Wagner is, to many fans, the very heart of 2000 AD. Involved from the earliest days of the Galaxy's Greatest Comic, he co-created Judge Dredd, as well as a whole cast of other memorable characters. His Paradox Press graphic novel A History of Violence was made into a major film by director David Cronenberg, and Judge Dredd adapted into a film twice, most recently in DREDD by Alex Garland and Pete Travis.Perhaps the most popular 2000 AD artist of all time, Brian Bolland's clean-line style and meticulous attention to detail ensure that his artwork on strips including Dan Dare, Future Shocks, Judge Dredd and Walter the Wobot looks as fresh today as it did when first published. Co-creator of both Judge Anderson and The Kleggs, Bolland's highly detailed style unfortunately precluded him from doing many sequential strips -- although he found the time to pencil both Camelot 3000 and Batman: The Killing Joke for DC Comics. Although Mike McMahon may not have illustrated as many strips as other 2000 AD creators, his importance to the comic cannot be overstated. It was McMahon who co-created perennial classics A.B.C. Warriors and The V.C.'s, and it was also McMahon who gave Judge Dredd his classic, defining, "big boots" look. McMahon has also illustrated One-Offs, Ro- Busters, and provided a classic run on Slaine. Outside of the Galaxy's Greatest Comic, he has pencilled Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight and The Last American, which he co-created with John Wagner.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Dark Jimbo on 13 July 2006
Format: Paperback
Whereas the continuity of the first Dredd Case Files collection was very slap-dash, here we start to get a lot of much-needed history and backstory for Dredd's world, establishing why the Judges came about, how their world became like it is, what surrounds the city, etc. In short, Dredd's world finally feels three-dimensional and fully-realised, and is much the better for it.

The bulk of the book is taken up by Dredd's first two epics, and this creates a far more stable line-up of creators (only two writers, for instance) that again give the adventures a more coherent voice and feel. The first tale, Pat Mills' The Cursed Earth, is absolutely manic - mutants, tyrannosuars, vampires, aliens, punk bikers, vengeful robot armies and gambling-obsessed mafia judges all throw themselves at Dredd in a roaring blood and guts epic that never lets up once. By the time you get to the base-under-seige ending, you'll actually be breathless, I guarantee it. John Wagner's The Day the Law Died slows things down (but only a little) and lets a raving maniac take complete power of Mega-city One. The results are too brilliantly mad-cap to go into here, but the wonderful satire and black humour in this tale mean the more unstable line-up of artists doesn't really matter. It's worth it anyway just to see a goldfish become Deputy Chief Judge.

As for the art - Mike McMahon and Brian Bolland are of course the stars, dominating the book as they do, McMahon's sometimes scratchy-looking art still conveying a madcap energy and glee at working on such stories, and Bolland producing some of the most intricate, detailed, well-handled art in comics. An essential purchase, containing classic Dredd tales only possibly bettered by what's to come in Books 4 and 5...
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ben P on 29 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This review is about the product rather than the content - which of course is great.
The sub £2 price tempted me to try this on Kindle for my Nexus 7.
Bit disappointing really. Tiny text. And the option to zoom on individual panels is very slow. So not a great reading experience and I won't be repeating it for other Dredd titles going cheap.
Might be better on an iPad.

Wish I'd seen a review like this before buying it. Dredd deserves 5 stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Crossman on 11 Sep 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Whilst the first volume of The Complete Case Files is made up almost completely of short stories this volume presents us with two Judge Dredd epics, and possibly the best epics ever written about Dredd.
This volume kicks off straight away with "The Cursed Earth". The story takes up nearly half of the book and charts Dredd's mission to go from Mega City 1 (New York) to take a vaccine which is killing all the inhabitants of Mega City 2 (Los Angeles). Superb writing and artwork has made this story a Dredd classic and should not be missed.

Following directly on from "The Cursed Earth" is "The Day The Law Died". This story takes up almost all of the remainder of the book and is on an equal par with "The Cursed Earth" in my opinion.

I deliberately have not gone into too much detail about the stories as I think it's best that you read and discover them for yourself. Suffice to say I think that volume 2 of The Complete Case Files is the best of the lot.

Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Huw Ringer on 2 Jan 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Like other reviewers, love the content - but hate the medium for consuming it. Why can't we zoom in to any level of detail we want like other comic book reader apps? The single panel at a time method used by Kindle is cumbersome and spoils the whole experience. Do not recommend buying any Kindle versions of graphic novels until they fix this!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Hogg on 29 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A third of the way into this volume is where Judge Dredd really starts.

The Cursed Earth saga, while an improvement over earlier efforts at telling an extended story, is still in the mould of the Luna 1 plot line, in that it is clearly just a series of episodes spun out until it is decided that its time to bring it to a conclusion. Not to say that it is without interest-- one of the least promising episodes, featuring a vampire robot, proves to be pivotal to the Dredd mythos with the first introduction of Chief Judge Fargo and President Bob Booth laying a deep vein of history that continues to be mined today.

But it's The Day the Law Died that really kicks things into gear. The first extended story in the classic mode, this has a clear narrative progression and is leagues ahead of anything that has gone before. There is a confidence on display from the writers to suggest that they no longer need to work at building up Dredd's world: it simply exists. Even though the readership at this point was still largely older children they are granted a respect that they no longer need everything spelled out for them.

There are flaws, of course. The kinks are still being worked out in the storytelling, which means the pacing is somewhat relentless and breakneck, and the speed at which Cal goes completely loopy is far more implausible reading the story in one go than it would have been in a weekly serialisation. And whilst the establishment of Judge Giant as a key supporting character is welcome, his sudden drift into jive vernacular is jarring, both in comparison to his earlier appearances and the knowledge that this is being written by a middle-aged white guy.
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