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Judge Dredd: America Paperback – 15 Mar 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Rebellion/2000AD (15 Mar. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905437587
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905437580
  • Product Dimensions: 18.7 x 1 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 147,838 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Wagner is, to many fans, the very heart of the renowned comic 2000 AD. Involved from the earliest days of the comic in 1977, he co-created Judge Dredd and Strontium Dog, as well as a whole cast of other memorable characters. Wagner has worked extensively beyond the Thargian universe, originating and editing a number of British periodicals as well as writing many American standards. His Paradox Press graphic novel A History of Violence was made into a major film from director David Cronenberg.


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About the Author

John Wagner is, to many fans, the very heart of 2000 AD. Involved from the earliest days of the Galaxy's Greatest Comic, he co-created Judge Dredd, as well as Strontium Dog, Robo-Hunter and a host of other 2000 AD mainstays, including the critically-acclaimed Button Man. Incredibly prolific throughout his career, and writing under a diversity of pen names -- often in concert with Alan Grant, with whom he devised and developed 2000 AD's sister comic, the Judge Dredd Megazine -- Wagner has worked extensively beyond the Thargian universe, originating and editing a number of British periodicals as well as writing many American standards, including Batman, The Punisher, Lobo and Star Wars bounty hunter Boba Fett. His Paradox Press graphic novel A History of Violence has recently been made into a film by David Cronenberg. Frazer Irving is without question one of 2000AD's brightest new stars. His distinctive art style, both on co-created strips like A Love Like Blood, Necronauts and Storming Heaven, as well as on Judge Dredd, Judge Death, Future Shocks, Terror Tales, Tharg the Mighty, The Scarlet Apocrypha and Sinister Dexter, have quickly brought him to the attention of the US industry. Irving recently completed both Fort: Prophet of the Unexplained for Dark Horse Comics and The Authority: Scorched Earth for DC/WildStorm.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mabs (Nexus Wookie) on 10 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
I was absolutely blown away by this comic! It is without doubt - a masterpiece. It is a stunning piece of work which can easily sit alongside such comic books greats as Watchmen or The Dark Knight Returns. But the subject matter is more resonant than the mentioned two, it is something more vital, and is like a chilling prophecy on where the our world is heading towards, especially in this climate of Terrorism and citizens rights being slowly eroded.

The story centres around two friends, America Jara and Bennett Beeny. Childhood freinds growing up in Mega City 1. Beeny is bullied as a child by other other kids, but find's a kindred spirit in America Jara. Beeny fall's in love with America but feels she is out of his league. His fears are soon realised when she falls for someone else. However, Beeny can never get America out of his mind. He send's letters to her but they soon grow to lead totally different lives. Beeny becomes a successful comedian and singer, whilst America Jara joins a Terrorist organisation 'Total War' which is intent on taking out the fascist Judges. But even as they drift apart, Beeny still yearns for his childhood friend and love. A chance meeting years later has terrifying consequuences for Beeny, and it will ultimately lead to tragedy for both.

America is a love story foremost, and a critical look into the oppresive way of life for the citizen in Dredd's world. Dredd is not the protagonist of the piece, but rather an antagonist. We see him at certain times like in the begining showing his views on where he stands: '' The people, they know where I stand. They need rules to live by - I provide them. They break the rule, I break them, Thats the way it works'' these words follow to the iconic artwork of Dredd standing on the American flag.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By CRAS on 4 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback
This volume collects the original 'America' storyline plus two sequels ('Fading of the light' and 'Cadet'). 'America' is still as good as I remember. Intelligent, politically astute and beautifully rendered by Colin MacNeil, whose work on 'Chopper: Song of the Surfer' I so admired. The story is self-contained, but provides a nice entry point to the larger 'Democracy' storyline, which also ties in with the epic 'Necropolis'. This story gives more of an insight into Dredd's world than any before or after, as evidenced perhaps by the much weaker sequels. 'Fading of the light' analyses the personal and social fallout from Benny Beeny's actions in 'America'. It is an interesting investigation of betrayal and transgender issues, but its unfortunately spoilt by some really poor artwork. Colin MacNeil's inks are okay-ish, but the horrendous digital colouring, with its garish, unnatural pallette really jars with the rather dark material of the script. The artwork on 'Cadet' is much improved, although still not anywhere near the standard I expected of MacNeil. What lets this third storyline down is the script. Unfortunately, it is a rather tedious police procedural, which has America Beeny (daughter of America and Benny Beeny) now a Justice Dept Cadet, working alongside Dredd to solve a frankly concocted "mystery" behind the events in the previous storylines. It doesn't ring true, feels like the facts are being re-hashed for the sake of reviving the characters and is distinctly unsatisfying as a whodunnit. A dismal way to end a series that started so brilliantly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Woodward TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 July 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dredd has always been a somewhat complex creation - a comic-book action hero, yet also a member of an oppressive police state, where the freedom of speech does not exist. America is one of the more blatantly political stories, which also has a touching human dimension.

Bennett Beeny & America are childhood friends. One will tow the line & grow up to have a successful career. The other will become a terrorist, fighting for democracy. Both will have their hearts broken in this tragic story, as Dredd brings his jackboot crashing down on their dreams.

Wagner's writing is perfectly accompanied by the moody art of Colin MacNeil, where the city itself always looms oppressively over its occupants like a 2-D expressionist film. Perhaps that's why he was often given the more political stories to actualise, such as the first chapter of Total War.

This volume also includes two sequels, both written many years after the original. They are not up to the standard of the first story - which would be a very tall order - but then one is merely a vehicle for introducing a new character, who became a welcome addition to Dredd's world. Plus I enjoyed them more upon re-reading than I did initially, when my expectations were higher. But the first story is still so strong that I can't bring myself to give this volume less than 5 stars.

A classic, mature, politically-aware Dredd story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mike G on 3 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is such a special piece. John Wagner knows his Dredd to the core and one can only wish that others wiling to pursue the same career take heed from the man's insight, his sharp political satire and the way he offers us situations with no easy definition of right or wrong, no easy answers to appease the palate. Dredd is wrong and America is wrong, and yet both are right in their own way, each a victim of the times. And just when you think the tragedy is over, the story unfolds on another level, another chapter of loss and despair. There are no clear winners in the end, only compromises, compromises that point to a middle ground, a path in the right direction perhaps. In years to come the graphic novel will be seen as a chronicle of our troubled times, an allegorical snapshot of our rulers' indiscretions and downright ruthlessness, and a template for the anger of a disaffected youth. Let's hope they can all be as good as this. Colour those panels with blood and fill the captions with rage!
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