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Jude the Obscure CD-ROM – Audiobook, 1 Dec 1998


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Product details

  • CD-ROM: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; MP3 Una edition (1 Dec. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1433254107
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433254109
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)

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Review

"Excellent text, appropriate aids (intro, notes), and an incredible price. This is an impressive bargain."--Robert Beckett, Southwest Missouri State University"Ingham's introduction, editing, and explanatory notes are unusually balanced, sound, and helpful in understanding this pivotal Victorian novel."--Frances Mayhew Rippy, Ball State University --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The classic novel, read by Michael Pennington --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Douglas Kemp on 17 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback
The plot has been so much rehearsed and summarised that I do not think there is a requirement to repeat this once more. So, just a few thoughts on the novel. I have read much Hardy over the years, though hitherto had not got around to this – possibly somewhat put off by its reputation for unremitting gloom.
It is a well written and powerful story. For late nineteenth century, certainly candid in its discussion of society’s stultifying sexuality and matrimonial arrangements, thus its reputation when first published as considered, by some, to be an immoral work. The four main characters – Jude Fawley, Sue Bridehead, Phillotson and Arabella all have a combination of frustrating and sympathy-inducing characteristics; there are no real unreconstructed evil monsters in the quartet, and even though Arabella is a selfish and cunning minx, the reader does not feel entirely lacking in empathy with her and the situations she finds herself in.
The overall theme is very much the typical Hardy one whereby characters are battered around by force of circumstance and the utter unpredictability of nature and the universe. There is little they can do about it, except struggle to do they best they can and accept that there is no overall plan to life and no directing deity to provide a rationale or strategy for the suffering that poor folk in the late nineteenth century Wessex experienced.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful By J. SCARROTT on 31 July 2006
Format: Paperback
When I received this book for Christmas last year, I looked at it and wondered if I would ever read it. Fortunately, I decided to about a month ago and did not regret it. It was a real hard-hitting read;don't be fooled by the blurb which sort of suggests it is a romantic sweet book as it is more powerful than that. It was one of few books that I can honestly say, when finished, left me with a shocked almost sad look on my face(and thats saying something as Iam an avid reader and not much hits me that much). The ending is completely unexpected which keeps you hooked. I highly recommend it.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Eugene Onegin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
If like me, your were put off Hardy by studying him at school or if you have in your mind's eye a writer obsessed with Wessex and a kind of moralising pastoralism, then try reading Jude. Here is a novel written with real emotional conviction and shot through with an anger which only comes from real experience. It is really a book about rebelling against conventions particularly about sexual morality and the aspirations of the artisan. Jude Fawley is an abandoned child who from his earliest years dreams of a richer fuller life both culturally and physically which he believes will be opened to him through higher education, symbolised by the distant spires of Christminster (Oxford). The passion with which Jude adores everything the venerable university stands for is only matched by his awareness of the futility of his dreams but that does not stop his hunger for books and learning which occupy his every free moment as he practices the trade of a stonemason. However, his sensual appetites override his academic ambitions and he finds himself imprisoned in a marriage devoid of the passion that brought it about. Meeting Sue Bridehead who he perceives as his soul mate underlines his captive state and they both come to question the very purpose of marriage resolving to live together without the need for a piece of paper. Yet the consequences of offending Victorian social codes are severe: from social exclusion to the loss of employment and indirectly the death of their children. Sue's response involves a return to the mindset she eschewed in her youth, Jude remains defiant bemoaning the fact that he was `fifty years ahead of his time' and coming to hold his beloved Oxford and its metaphysics in contempt. Rarely has the anguish of broken dreams had more resonance than here.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gregory S. Buzwell VINE VOICE on 13 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback
Branded 'Jude the Obscene' in at least one contemporary review and famously burned by the Bishop of Wakefield Hardy's final novel is nothing if not controversial. While most novels from the Victorian era that caused a bit of a stir at the time now seem relatively tame Jude retains much of its power to shock and disturb. The book was many years ahead of its time and even in the Victorian fin de siecle - an age not especially noted for its prim and retiring ways - it stands out as the work of a brilliant but very bitter and angry man. Jude the Obscure attacks marriage and the Church in a savage fashion; it castigates the class system and the world of privilege that allows the rich to study at university while denying the opportunity to those who lack money and status; it simultaneously loves and despises women who make an effort to live their lives as they wish in preference to tamely bowing down to convention and it rages against an indifferent universe that neither loves nor hates mankind but merely continues ever onwards, equally oblivious to love and beauty as to suffering and death. It's not an easy read, but it is a perceptive one and, as ever with Hardy, beyond the bleakness much of the descriptive writing is touched with a sublime poetry.

Jude Fawley, intelligent, sensitive and handsome, dreams of attending Christminster (a thinly veiled Oxford) only to fall foul of class, money and the wiles of a woman, Arabella, out to nab herself a husband before her looks fade. Trapped in a loveless marriage Jude becomes increasingly attracted to his cousin Sue Bridehead, a woman with her own ideas, a dislike of convention and a deeply capricious nature.
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