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Journey's End (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 26 Oct 2000

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Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (26 Oct. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141183268
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141183268
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 0.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,277 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By B. Gray on 26 July 2011
Format: Paperback
Many of the more luke-warm reviewers of this powerful play clearly haven't been to see a good production. I don't think it's about boredom, rather about how men cope, without going mad, with the impossible horror of having seen thousands of their comrades die hideously in battle often in prolonged agony, of knowing that they themselves are likely to die soon, of hearing constant battle noise or the single cracks of sniper fire when it's quieter. Each of the characters deal with this in a different but equally convincing way. Go and see the superb production now on in London, or any production you can, re-read the play and I think you'll have a different take on what you've read. It is after all designed to be seen and heard, not read.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Sept. 2000
Format: Hardcover
I first read this play when I was studying for an English GCSE. To be honest, I didn't really expect much of it, as I don't always enjoy the books we are told to read. However, from the moment I opened it, I knew this was something special. Sherriff's realistic portrayal of the WWI trenches and the relationships between the men really do stay with you forever. I never wanted to put it down This is a gem of a book.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By T. M. Fuller on 6 Dec. 2007
Format: Paperback
'Journey's End' opens in the bleak environment of the Western Front as a new arrival James Raleigh comes to join a group of soldiers in the trench system. The 'journey' on which the soldiers embark upon is contains two human attributes, the first being emotional attachment, the second being the power of perceiverance.

Sherriff does not need to go into the graphic details of what happens when the men 'go over the top', however he builds up a number of passionate friendships that both move and endear the reader. The first of these relationships is between Commander Stanhope and Officer Osborne who is 'the only man who could understand me' as described by the company commander at the moment of Osborne's demise. Their relationship is one of two brothers as they look after each other on the Front line - 'what would I ever do without you old chap' exclaims Stanhope, 'I do not know' responds Osborne - inferring the loving relationship the two characters share. At the moment of Osborne's death I was shocked at the anger that welled up inside Stanhope as he responded to the comments from the survivors of the daylight raid on 'the Boche'. He shouts at Hibbert - 'What did you say!...Get out of my sight!' in anger at losing his 'most trusted friend' and the sense of loss is only solidified by the explosion of emotion that feels his dialogue whilst conversing with Raleigh (the soul commanding survivor of the raid).

The audience can fully understand the sense of anger that is perpetuated by Stanhope at the loss of his comrade. The loss moves the reader as the emotional outpouring fills six pages of intense dialogue between the commanding officer and the other soldiers.

The opposite reaction can be found at the climax of the performance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ROBERT WORLEY on 5 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback
I have read and re-read this wonderful book several times. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Great War and doubtless there will be many who will claim that it was not a 'just war' - merely a most terrible waste of young men or rather boys. How we got entailed in such a bloodbath is a complex issue and it was not always a case of 'Lions led by Donkeys'. The casualty rate among young officers such as Sherriff was enormous. For the most part, they were courageous youngsters straight from school who were keen to do their duty for King and Country - and carried out that duty without thought for their own safety - thus showing true leadership. We shall doubtless hear a good deal about the satire, 'Black Adder' also the brilliant stage production of 'Oh What a Lovely War' and those cynics who decry the sacrifice made by so many young men. But when considering the 1914-18 War, surely we should place it in the context of the times and not judge the actions of those in command by today's standards. Now in my Seventies,, my father served in the trenches for some three years - first in the Queen's Westminster Rifles then in the 15th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles. I have his papers and he was discharged in 1918 suffering from 'severe neurasthenia' or put another way, half mad! Might I suggest that if you are able that you visit the sites of some of these most terrible battles. Such a visit should bring home to any sensitive individual just how fortunate he/she is to live in the comparative safety and wellbeing of 2014.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 July 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the most moving play I have ever read.This play possesses all the dramatic components it needs in order to make it a success: comedy, tragedy, conflict and a flawed hero. This play is the only play I have ever read that has brought a tear to my eye.
As a result of the play's brilliance I am now starring and co-directing a performance of it at my school!
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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
This drama about trench life in the first world war is a very moving piece. The characters- Captain Stanhope, who has changed dramatically since he came to the front, Raleigh, the young officer and schoolfriend of Stanhope who hero-worships him, the avuncular teacher Osborne, the comic cook Mason, and the other characters are portrayed sensitively and accurately. The play brings out all the tragedy of war, as you would expect, but is unsentimental and even brings out the humour of the situation at times. In short, well worth reading- especially around November 11th.
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