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Joseph's Temple: The Dynamic Relationship between Freemasonry and Mormonism Hardcover – 30 May 2014


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 480 pages
  • Publisher: The University of Utah Press (30 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607813440
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607813446
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 3.3 x 23.5 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,138,022 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"The definitive treatment by the acknowledged authority in this field--long awaited, and needed since the 1820s. Homer skips the nonsense but not the details in this masterful perspective on the many meanings of Masonry in the Mormon world." --Rick Grunder, editor of "Mormon Parallels: A Bibliographic Source"

About the Author

Michael W. Homer practises law in Salt Lake City. He is an award-winning author and has published numerous articles in the fields of law and Mormonism. He is the editor of On the Way to Somewhere Else: European Sojourners in the Mormon West, 1834–1930 (University of Utah Press, 2010).

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Amazon.com: 6 reviews
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Essential reading in the subject 26 May 2014
By Dallas B. Robbins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Great study on the relationship between Mormonism and Masonry. There will be details here and there that other scholars will disagree with, but this work is well written, not overwrought or bogged down in minutia, engages counter arguments, and is detailed and thorough enough for the specialist or general reader. Probably not for a Mormon who is not well read in Mormon history - would certainly be a shock to one who knows little on the subject. But Homer's work provides the essential text on the subject and provides a great beginning point for further study in this area.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The parallels between LDS Church doctrine and temple worship and ... 8 Oct 2014
By Arthur E. Nifong Jr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The parallels between LDS Church doctrine and temple worship and Masonic legends and rituals has been noted by historians for years. Although many early LDS Church leaders were Master Masons, the ties between the two organizations broke down after Joseph Smith's death and the Church became openly involved in practicing polygamy in the mid to late 1800s. As an individual who belongs to both organizations, I found the book fascinating. Most of the books on the subject aren't worth reading. This one is well researched and is heavily footnoted. The author does show respect for each organization by not revealing the various signs, tokens, passwords, and due-guards used in Masonic and LDS Temple rituals. Smith introduced the endowment to a small group of followers shortly after becoming a Master Mason. The author doesn't attempt to answer whether or not Smith was "restoring" or "plagiarizing" things when he created the LDS endowment ritual. There is no way to definitively answer that question. It really depends on what you believe about Joseph Smith. Of course, a third option may be that Smith was "restoring" some things and "borrowing" other things to help his followers remember certain lessons/principles. Again, it sort of depends on what you believe about Joseph Smith. The author does point out inconsistencies in various policies the Grand Lodge of Utah and the LDS Church have taken over the years on various subjects. However, I believe most readers would say he is fair in pointing out these inconsistencies and contradictions. Today, relations between the Grand Lodge of Utah and the LDS Church are generally cordial. In 2008, Glen Cook, an LDS Mason, was installed by the Grand Lodge of Utah as the 137th grand master. Highly recommended
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
It's not about the beehive! 10 July 2014
By S. Bergstrom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Finally someone who knows both Masonry and Mormonism! The author gives a scholarly presentation of the intersection between these two groups. Everything is exhaustively documented and referenced. I would recommend it to anyone with a serious interest in the topic and caution them to leave their preconceptions at the door because there is so much more to understand.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The end of my whiskey and cinnamon baths. 10 Oct 2014
By M. Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've wondered why D&C 89 talks about strong drinks as being for the washing of bodies. After reading this book, I've stopped bathing in whiskey, realizing now that it was a ceremonial practice. Nobody told me that! :)

I've loved learning about the source of some of the practices and beliefs that have been a part of every day of my life. This is a very well-researched and structured book. I had to take the first couple of chapters in smaller bites and re-read to make sure I was understanding things correctly.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not perfect, but a major step forward 9 July 2014
By Robert W. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the book I wish had been available when working on my own study of early Mormonism more than a decade ago. Not perfect, but a major step forward.
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