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Joseph Stiglitz and the World Bank: The Rebel Within (Anthem Studies in Development and Globalization) Paperback – 1 Jul 2001

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Product details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Anthem Press (1 July 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1898855536
  • ISBN-13: 978-1898855538
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 2.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,982,176 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'Undoubtedly, the book has extended the frontiers of development economics and development assisting institutions should take note. […] It is a must for those interested in development policy-making processes and graduate students of development economics.' —S. N. Kulkarni, in ‘Development and Change’ book reviews

Review

'A powerful collection of key speeches from one of the most controversial economists of our time... The most provocative book on international financial policy to appear for a long time.' —Jeff Madrick, 'Challenge Magazine', contributing columnist, 'New York Times'


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on 2 Mar. 2009
Format: Paperback
Joseph Stiglitz was Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank from February 1997 to December 1999. He was dismissed a few months before the end of his contract and replaced by Sir Nicholas Stern.

This is a thought-provoking collection of nine of his most important speeches given between January 1998 and January 2000. They all undermine the conventional wisdom of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the US Treasury Department and HM Treasury.

He exposes the failures of the Washington consensus, of shock therapy in the transition economies, of financial liberalisation, and of the IMF's handling of East Asia's financial crisis. He discusses his vision of development as social transformation; the role of knowledge in markets; the importance of openness, workers' participation in firms, the right to know and economic democracy; and the value of trade unions.

He observes that China accounted for two-thirds of all the growth in low-income countries between 1978 and 1995. In the 1990s, China's GDP almost doubled, while Russia's GDP almost halved and its inequality doubled. In the last few decades, East Asia's states have increased their GDPs and life expectancies, extended education and reduced poverty. In the late 1990s, reckless loans by US, European and Japanese banks caused Korea's crisis. Market entities, not the government, misdirected credit; the government's only failure lay in not regulating the banks.

Stiglitz notes, "If one didn't know better, it might seem as if the fundamental propositions of neoclassical economics were designed to undermine the rights and position of labour." Full employment is more important than welfare, since welfare can never provide the dignity that comes from work.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "yvonnetsp" on 2 Aug. 2003
Format: Paperback
I teach Business Studies to A level students and shall be using this book to focus students thinking for eg about The Trade Cycle and external influences; High interest rates attracting investement - but there are downsides; Ethics, Cartels and the dumping of Russian aluminium. This will give students an opportunity to think wider and put an economic focus back into the business environment. I would be keen for undergraduates of business and MBA students to reach into this book.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Just a guy on 14 Oct. 2006
Format: Paperback
Certainly the policies advocated by the IMF are quite painful but the reason is that it is a lender of last resort and is approached for stabilisation programmes only when the government of the troubled country has managed to screw up everything. Hence, the administered policies are painful and focused on the short-term rather than on economic growth.

Unfortunately Stiglitz does not offer any viable alternative; instead his advice boils down to "keep on spending". The outcome: a biased account of the Washington consensus. I presume that all that criticism and bitterness originate in traditional leftist bias in academia plus some sort of rationalisation of the time the author spent at the World Bank (in my opinion, without achieving anything notable there).
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Thought and Works of Chairman Joe 6 Mar. 2003
By Bibliophile - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Stiglitz, who is the former Chairman of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers and Chief Economist of the World Bank, won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics (younger than Milton Friedman had been when he won his Nobel). This moderate pragmatist can hardly be called a soft leftie and yet his stinging attack on the IMF and the World Bank (both organizations intensely disliked by Republican rightwingers) is both surprising......and perfectly justified, in my view. He develops this theme more fully in his other book "Globalization and Its Discontents," while this small book is a good extract of his economic philosophy. In his many public speeches and statements Chairman Joe lends the full weight of his considerable authority to China-boosters and China-lovers everywhere. But his frequently expressed optimism of China's economic prospects is not his main point - he uses China as an example to show why and how you can avoid messing things up if you use the right methods.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A very clear vision.. 3 April 2004
By MADC - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I understand this book to be a very clear description of what is missing in the way the international financial organizations address the problems of developing countries. But there is more to say about one of the core problems in our countries and that is the weakness or the lack of institutions and as a result of this ..corruption and worst....impunity. Politicians no matter what party..protect each other. A lot of people's money goes to the pockets of a few ... money that should be spent in education and health. Some of this money comes from the WB , IDB , etc...
Giving it a little more thought..maybe this kind of arrangement is the best situation for these corrupted third world politicians and for the big multinational firms and financial institutions that lend them money...to keep the people in poor countries ignorant and illiterate so that the big firms can keep their advantages with unlimited cheap labor pools. Sure , maybe this situation is viewed as a comparative advantage or just as business strategies by the big firms..but for our own politicians-gangsters ....this is a major crime and should be treated as such...If we just could !!!
Why keep lending money to be used by these thieves?? Well, maybe some goes back to the source...banking accounts in developed nations or comsumption of luxury goods manufactured in the hometown of some of the top brass in some Bank. Who knows?? Believe me.. ,it is not funny to see the son of some new-rich state official driving the last model Lexus SUV with your money!!! Why we the people do not do something about it?? How?? Going to the corrupted legal institutions or to the corrupted police?? Going to the streets and making justice with our own hands and then be accused of terrorists or leftist anti-free market mob and risk an invasion by the US Marine Corps??? Voting??? Give me a break!!! We often see on TV the prez of the USA drinking coffee and chating with some these third world politician-mobsters in his oval office ....Why???
Mr. Stiglitz certainly has clarified and explained the problems we face ...but the solutions are not easy to undertake. There are too many factors involved and the one that could make a difference...to change the mindset of the people...means nothing less than a mental rebirth and a total destruction of all cultural heritage....And this could take centuries....or some sort of dictatorship.... Is there any hope for us???
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Fine study of the failure of capitalist economics 2 Mar. 2009
By William Podmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Joseph Stiglitz was Chief Economist and Senior Vice President at the World Bank from February 1997 to December 1999. He was dismissed a few months before the end of his contract and replaced by Sir Nicholas Stern.

This is a thought-provoking collection of nine of his most important speeches given between January 1998 and January 2000. They all undermine the conventional wisdom of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the US Treasury Department and HM Treasury.

He exposes the failures of the Washington consensus, of shock therapy in the transition economies, of financial liberalisation, and of the IMF's handling of East Asia's financial crisis. He discusses his vision of development as social transformation; the role of knowledge in markets; the importance of openness, workers' participation in firms, the right to know and economic democracy; and the value of trade unions.

He observes that China accounted for two-thirds of all the growth in low-income countries between 1978 and 1995. In the 1990s, China's GDP almost doubled, while Russia's GDP almost halved and its inequality doubled. In the last few decades, East Asia's states have increased their GDPs and life expectancies, extended education and reduced poverty. In the late 1990s, reckless loans by US, European and Japanese banks caused Korea's crisis. Market entities, not the government, misdirected credit; the government's only failure lay in not regulating the banks.

Stiglitz notes, "If one didn't know better, it might seem as if the fundamental propositions of neoclassical economics were designed to undermine the rights and position of labour." Full employment is more important than welfare, since welfare can never provide the dignity that comes from work.

He points out that recent studies suggest that "increased labour market flexibility could actually exacerbate economic fluctuations." Indeed, "greater wage flexibility ... may actually contribute to an enhanced likelihood of a recession."

He urges preventing crises by controlling capital flows. There is a large literature showing "capital and financial market liberalisation ... unambiguously contributing to economic volatility and an increased probability of financial and currency crises and recessions."
Five Stars 17 Feb. 2015
By Sajed and Rosie Kamal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thanks!
2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
correction 20 Jun. 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
the correct title is: "The Rebel Within: Joseph Stiglitz and the World Bank"
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