Joseph Balsamo and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£14.47
  • RRP: £17.13
  • You Save: £2.66 (16%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Joseph Balsamo has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Joseph Balsamo Paperback – 30 Jul 2008


See all 26 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 30 Jul 2008
£14.47
£14.47 £23.50
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£14.47 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Product details

  • Paperback: 588 pages
  • Publisher: Waking Lion Press (30 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600961150
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600961151
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,717,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Misfit TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
Joseph Balsamo begins with a meeting in the dead of night high in the mountains as a group of robed and hooded freemasons from around the world meet to plot the fall of the French Monarchy (it's actually more complicated than that, but I'm not going to try to put it into words). The leader of this group, Joseph Balsamo, then takes shelter in a storm at the impoverished household of the Baron de Taverney and his daughter Andrée and things then become very mysterious indeed. How is it the younger Balsamo can recall incidents from Taverney's younger days as if he had been there himself? What mysterious hold does Balsamo have over the beauteous Andrée that he can command her actions with a wave of his hand? How is it that when the party of Marie Antoinette stops at Taverney Balsamo provides a sumptuous repast replete with gold plate out of thin air?

After this, the story switches to Paris and Versailles with the intrigues and shenanigans of Louis XV's mistress Madame DuBarry as she connives to have an elderly Baroness agree to present her at court, Balsamo's wife begging sanctuary at a nunnery (very creepy), the wedding procession of Marie Antoinette, Balsamo's mentor's efforts to find the secret to eternal life (the final ingredient needed being the most costly of all) and ending in one heck of a cliff hanger as a fireworks display goes awry and puts Andrée in harm's way with only one person to save her.

Suffice it to say that Dumas' tale of the lives and loves of the Court of Louis XV and the growing tension amongst the lower classes of Paris and beyond was quite entertaining, especially with the mysterious appearances and disappearances of Balsamo in and out of the story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Joseph Balsamo 15 Nov. 2001
By Bob Doust - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a must for Dumas fans. Joseph Balsamo is the first book in a series that capture the history of the French revolution in a novel that is truly of epic proportins.
Love, war, fantasy and politics are delicately woven into the fabric of the story. Highly recommended.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Great Book - Very Sloppy Publishing 21 July 2007
By A. Keresey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My one-star review here has nothing to do with Dumas' novel, but a very poor publishing job by 'Boomer Books'. It seems to average about a typo or two per page. At times these typos actually confuse the reading, since they are not only misspellings, but also whole words will be replaced with entirely different words. I can take a typo here and there, but in this book it is so common that it begins to affect the enjoyability of reading it.

I will say that the book itself is great and I highly recommend it. I have not seen any other versions of this book, but if you can find one published by other than 'Boomer Books', it would be much better. There is no introduction or translation notes or anything like that. Its very obvious that Boomer put no efforts or care into this.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
worst publisher in the world 24 Sept. 2007
By daniel krag - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
in fifty years of reading books in several languages, i have never seen a book so poorly prepared. there is not a single page without a typo, misspelling, wrong font, bad punctuation... some pages have as many as ten mistakes. clearly no one at the publisher read the book. apparently no one really cared. it's absolutely awful. don't buy this edition.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
What a piece of crap 20 Sept. 2007
By Laura Slapikoff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is so badly proofread and edited that it's a chore to get through it. There are an average of 3 typos per page, not to mention incorrect word substitutions, improper italicization (almost every instance of the words "by" and "my" is italicized), and downright bad translation. The worst crime is that the "editor" chose to peremptorily truncate the novel on the basis that the last chapters aren't good enough to bother to print. Dumas' French Revolution novels are important works of historical fiction and this edition of Joseph Balsamo is an insult to both the author and the reader. I'm disappointed in Amazon for doing business with such a disreputable publisher.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Book one in Dumas' tale of The French Revolution 22 Jun. 2008
By Misfit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Joseph Balsamo begins with a meeting in the dead of night high in the mountains as a group of robed and hooded freemasons from around the world meet to plot the fall of the French Monarchy (it's actually more complicated than that, but I'm not going to try to put it into words). The leader of this group, Joseph Balsamo, then takes shelter in a storm at the impoverished household of the Baron de Taverney and his daughter Andrée and things then become very mysterious indeed. How is it the younger Balsamo can recall incidents from Taverney's younger days as if he had been there himself? What mysterious hold does Balsamo have over the beauteous Andrée that he can command her actions with a wave of his hand? How is it that when the party of Marie Antoinette stops at Taverney Balsamo provides a sumptuous repast replete with gold plate out of thin air?

After this, the story switches to Paris and Versailles with the intrigues and shenanigans of Louis XV's mistress Madame DuBarry as she connives to have an elderly Baroness agree to present her at court, Balsamo's wife begging sanctuary at a nunnery (very creepy), the wedding procession of Marie Antoinette, Balsamo's mentor's efforts to find the secret to eternal life (the final ingredient needed being the most costly of all) and ending in one heck of a cliff hanger as a fireworks display goes awry and puts Andrée in harm's way with only one person to save her.

Suffice it to say that Dumas' tale of the lives and loves of the Court of Louis XV and the growing tension amongst the lower classes of Paris and beyond was quite entertaining, especially with the mysterious appearances and disappearances of Balsamo in and out of the story. I also very much enjoyed the way Dumas used the character of Gilbert and his rationales about his lack of bread and the methods he would use to obtain the bread an excellent way to support the early beginnings of socialism and resentment against the monarchy. Be advised, you won't find the swashbuckling page turning excitement of the Musketeer series. This is the first of a five volume series and Dumas is setting up much of the background for the later books in this one, so some readers might find this slow paced at times and I only recommend this for Dumas fans (I'm one) or for those looking for well written fictional tales of the times leading up to the French Revolution. Next book in the series, Memoirs of a Physician.

Note, I see some other reviewers complaining about a poorly published edition of this book. I obtained a nice aging copy from the library and was quite satisfied with that, and my review is for that book and not the Boomer Publishing edition.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback