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John Wesley Harding [VINYL] Original recording remastered


Price: £26.67 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£26.67 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.

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BOB DYLAN Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Bob Dylan's influence on popular music is incalculable. As a songwriter, he pioneered several different schools of pop songwriting, from confessional singer/songwriter to winding, hallucinatory, stream-of-consciousness narratives. As a vocalist, he broke down the notion that a singer must have a conventionally good voice in order to ... Read more in Amazon's Bob Dylan Store

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John Wesley Harding [VINYL] + Nashville Skyline + Bringing It All Back Home
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Product details

  • Vinyl (8 Dec 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Music On Vinyl
  • ASIN: B00499SA5A
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 201,928 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. John Wesley Harding (2:55)
2. As I Went Out One Morning (2:47)
3. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine (3:49)
4. All Along The Watchtower (2:29)
5. The Ballad Of Frankie Lee And Judas Priest (5:29)
6. Drifter's Escape (2:44)
7. Dear Landlord (3:15)
8. I Am A Lonesome Hobo (3:17)
9. I Pity The Poor Immigrant (4:10)
10. The Wicked Messenger (2:01)
11. Down Along The Cove (2:18)
12. I'll Be Your Baby Tonight (2:37)

Product Description

180 grams audiophile vinyl / 2010 Remastered Mono Edition

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 79 people found the following review helpful By KMorris on 12 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
Of all Bob Dylan albums, "John Wesley Harding" was the most eagerly awaited. It was his first record put out following his enforced temporary retirement brought about by the motorcycle accident which had occurred in July 1966 and it`s story is fascinating. His previous album, the historic double, "Blonde On Blonde" was a highly produced collection on which he was accompanied by a large electric ensemble of mostly top Nashville studio musicians perfecting what Dylan himself had dubbed his `wild mercury sound'. The songs were lyrically intricate affairs, often lengthy performances (five, seven minutes ; "Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands" clocking in at just under eleven!). The question was : what would his new work sound like ? The answer was, nothing like "Blonde On Blonde".

Just prior to his accident, Dylan had completed a physically and mentally exhausting world tour which had been full of controversy (acoustic versus electric battle, the infamous "Judas!" cry). He was at a peak of commercial and creative success, but his personal state is well-documented to have been less than perfect. "John Wesley Harding" turned out to be the sound of a man who had seemed to have saved himself from the brink of some kind of oblivion. A man who had regained some degree of control.

Dylan had not actually been inactive during the hiatus. Much `home' recording had been done with the musicians who would become The Band, and this work, the legendary "Basement Tapes" can now been seen as the obvious link between "Blonde On Blonde" and this new album. "The Basement Tapes" would not however be officially released until 1975. "John Wesley Harding" was the result of three studio sessions in Nashville with regular producer Bob Johnston and engineer Charlie Bragg.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Tim Purcell on 24 July 2002
Format: Audio CD
Written in that mysterious period after the motorcycle accident, this album can be classed as Dylans last great masterpiece until 'Blood on the Tracks' almost 7 years later. The sound is of a Dylan far more at ease with himself after the choas and confusion of the 'Blonde on Blonde' period. The quality of the album is often overshadowed by 'All along the watchtower' which grew out of the album after the famous (and phenomenaly brilliant) Hendrix cover.
However songs like 'Dear Landlord', As i went out one Morning' and the brilliant 'Ballad of Frankie lee and Judas Priest' are fine examples as to why there is no rating system that can do justice to Dylan at his best.
How many stars? All the ones in the sky mate!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By GlynLuke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Dec 2011
Format: Audio CD
After Bob`s notorious motorcycle nightmare, the exact details of which are still somewhat murky, the chameleon of `folk` returned to the musical fold with one of the
strangest and strongest albums not only of his career but of anybody`s career. It doesn`t sound particularly strange or unusual, at least in hindsight, but it sure did then. It was a breath of fresh air too, with a set of songs so confidently composed and played that it seemed, then as now, one of the key albums of the past fifty years.
I believe the period of Dylan`s career between the classic early & mid-60s records and the shatteringly superlative masterpiece that was Blood On The Tracks has too often been underrated. Not only did we get this almost unclassifiable album, but also the flawed yet fascinating Self Portrait, the optimistic, downright sunny New Morning, and the perennially overlooked, stunningly good Planet Waves.
One or two previous reviewers have given excellent blow-by-blow accounts of JWH,
so I won`t repeat what you can read there, and happily direct you to their fine reviews. This is a personal response to this most personal of records.
From the moment I first heard Dylan, it wasn`t only the words - such words! - that gripped me, or even the music itself. What I loved then and love still is the textures he finds in his recordings. Another Side Of...sounds nothing like New Morning. Desire is texturally rich, as is the denser, darker Street-Legal (another massively undervalued album). As for the more recent `Indian Summer` releases such as Time Out Of Mind and Love & Theft, both wonderful, they sound completely different from each other. It`s not simply down to production, but texture too.
JWH is a pared down record - it sounds like a field recording, in fact - but it too has texture.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jervis VINE VOICE on 4 Mar 2007
Format: Audio CD
It has taken me a number of years to fully appreciate 'John Wesley Harding' but i've finally come to the conclusion it's arguably Bob's finest album.
The album does not seem particuarly revolutionary particuarly when compared with its more extravagant prececessors 'Bring It All Back Home', 'Highway 61 Revisited' and 'Blonde On Blonde' but it was nonetheless a very brave release. Bob decided to swim against the tide somewhat as it must be remembered its release coincided with the excesses of the psychedelic era with 'Sergeant Pepper' leading the way in 1967.
'John Wesley Harding's relatively 'quiet' release and its folk/country contents being rather modestly recorded with minimum instumentation and Bob's rather muted vocal delivery has managed to forever cast it in the shadows of Bob's more celebrated work. However, the album's strong biblical and moral references delivered in a series of parables has perhaps made 'John Wesley Harding' Bob's most mysterious and impenetrable work to date. Within these songs he raises a series of questions but delivers no firm answers - it's up to the listeners to draw their own conclusions.
The album's title refers to the outlaw John Wesley Hardin although the details within the song's lyrics are inaccurate.

All 'John Wesley Harding's songs sink in over time although patience is a virtue. The strength of the songs are the questions they raise and the ambiguity within the use of the language Bob chooses. This is the reason the album is one of Bob's most enduring.

The final couple of songs 'Down Along The Cove' and 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight' are a little more simplistic in tone pointing the way to Bob's follow up 'Nashville Skyline'.
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