John Peel and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.88
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

John Peel Paperback – 26 May 2005


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.01 £0.01
Audio CD, Audiobook, CD, Unabridged
"Please retry"


Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Orion; 2nd.edition edition (26 May 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0752876740
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752876740
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2.3 x 29.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,816,358 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

This excellent biography ... paints an affectionate portrait of this unpretentious, humorous presenter who seems to have been loved by everyone who met him. (SUNDAY TIMES)

Wall's book pays fair tribute to a man who, everyone agreed, was just a really decent bloke. (BIRMINGHAM POST)

This is a warm, affectionate, well-researched book, written by a fan to share with other fans. (LEICESTER MERCURY)

[a] poignant tribute to arguably the most influential man in the history of British rock music. (DAILY POST (WALES))

This is a warm, affectionate, well-written, well-researched book, written by a fan to share with other fans. (SUNDERLAND ECHO)

Book Description

A tribute biography of the hugely popular DJ and broadcaster John Peel

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. J. Taylor on 5 May 2005
Format: Paperback
I was mortified by the loss of John Peel and bought this book hoping for more of an insight into the character of the man. What I found was a rushed work, padded out with the festive fifty lists. The text is in large, spaced out print like a kid who is trying to make his essay look like many days hard work instead of a rush job to hit a deadline. Given that in this case the deadline was dictated by someone's death, and the motivation a cash in this struck me as quite sick.
The content of the book does trace Peels life and career in some detail and is written in admiring tones, but there are few quotes from the man himself. A good biography is written by a close friend or at least someone who has access to the subjects thoughts and feelings but there is a sense of distance between Peel and Wall throughout, in fact he states they only me once whilst waiting for a lift.
I was incredibly disappointed with both the book and Mick Walls apparent lack of shame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 29 Dec 2004
Format: Hardcover
What sums up this book for me is the fact that the last forty pages consist of lists ... John Peel's annual, festive playlists. Forty pages of record titles added to pad out a self-evidently insubstantial work.
Reading the book, you realise that this is a hastily put together piece of work. I don't see exploitation anywhere in the title, but you sense it's written to grab the emotion which accompanied John Peel's death. You hope it was written as a tribute ... but. And you question why you, yourself, bought it. You hope you're buying it as a mark of respect ... but sense there is an element of voyeurism.
The author admits he only met Peel a couple of times, but, then again, so did I. The text of the book is quite neatly assembled - but it really is just a brief history of events, almost an extended CV. Peel did this, Peel did that, Peel worked here, Peel worked there. There's no analysis, no insight, no evaluation of quite what made the man so extraordinary.
And Peel had an extraordinary effect on the life of the British Isles and beyond. He played some amazing stuff, music which no other radio station or DJ would touch. He played some utter garbage. What he was prepared to do was recognise that there are hundreds of thousands out there who dream of being musicians or artists - not necessarily celebrities or stars - but who dream of making music and being heard. It's part of growing up - trying to find a voice, trying to discover yourself, trying to be noticed.
Some have talent, most don't. But what they all need, what we all of us need, is motivation and encouragement.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. Skudder TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Jan 2005
Format: Hardcover
John Peel's death was announced on 26th October 2004, the funeral was on 12th November 2004, and this book was in the shops in time for early December, so I think it is fair to say that it was fairly rushed.
Of the 231 pages the last 40 are just filled with lists of all the 'Festive Fifty' charts from the Peel shows, and most of the 30 pages before that are quotes from various people wrapped up in a little commentary. Most of the quotes are ones that I, and most other people, had already read in newspapers, magazines and the BBC website. The other 160 pages do not go into much more depth, and nearly all the material seems to have been taken from previously published interviews.
To be fair to the author, the book is as good as it could be given the short time to write it. Obviously an autobiography is what most Peel fans would prefer, but a decent biography could be written if enough time was taken to seek out and interview family members, old schoolfriends, contacts from Peel's time in the US and lots of other people. The books failing is the absence of any real volume of original material.
This is not to say that the book is totally useless, but just that if you have read the large articles and obituaries in various newspapers and magazines during November and December 2004 there will not be much in this book which is unfamiliar. If you read this expecting a biography you will be hugely disappointed, but then the title of the book is "John Peel a tribute to the much-loved DJ and broadcaster": in fairness you cannot accuse the author of pretending to have written a biography and throughout the book there is the sense that he does want to pay tribute to the man.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Sep 2014
Format: Paperback
For a certain sort of person (usually, but not invariably, male), John Peel seemed to lead the perfect life: being given records for free, being paid for playing them, living contentedly in the country with a happy family, sounding like a normal, modest person. His untimely death in 2004 brought forth tributes from the musicians he'd discovered, and his countless listeners. And this book.

The first part is an brisk canter through Peel's life, including his lengthy career at BBC Radio 1 which was built around his late-night programme featuring an eclectic playlist and live sessions from bands which had taken his fancy. The second part is made up of the aforementioned tributes, whilst the third part is a listing of Peel's so-called Festive Fifties (his annual countdown of listeners' favourite records of the year).

Inclusion of this list might look like padding in a hastily put-together book published shortly after Peel's death, but reading through it gives a good sense of the breadth and depth of the music Peel introduced his listeners to - from Led Zeppelin's "Stairway To Heaven" (probably the most well-known rock song of all time, which topped the 1976 countdown), through "How Soon Is Now?" by The Smiths (number 1 in 1984), to lesser-known songs such as "I Don't Have Time To Stand Here With You Fighting About The Size Of My Dick", by Ballboy (which squeaked in at number 49 in 2004). In today's connected world, it's perhaps becoming harder to remember how a single radio DJ could be so pivotal in discovering and sharing new music like this; this book helps to do that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback