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John Logie Baird: A Life - A Personal Biography Hardcover – 30 Jun 2002

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John Logie Baird: A Life - A Personal Biography + Television and Me: The Memoirs of John Logie Baird
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 478 pages
  • Publisher: NMSE - Publishing Ltd; First Edition edition (30 Jun. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1901663760
  • ISBN-13: 978-1901663761
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 4.3 x 24.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,071,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'Kamm and Baird, the latter the inventor's son, paint a strikingly clear portrait of the inventor who started it all.' -- Russell A Potter, The Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television (US) 04

'The authors make technology and personal life walk hand-in-hand and his unconventionality is discussed candidly.' -- The Engineer, 13 September, 02

'This book is full of surprises. It is a good book, no doubt about that.' -- Sunday Herald, August, 02

'a carefully researched and informative account of the man behind the inventions. Makes good use of family archives.' -- British Journal for the History of Science, June 04

'when people wish to look up his life and achievements it will be to this remarkable book they turn first.' -- Michael Bennet-Levy, BVWS Bulletin, winter 2002

About the Author

Antony Kamm is a writer and former Lecturer in Publishing Studies.Dr Malcolm Baird, son of John Logie Baird, is a former chairman of the Chemical Engineering department, McMaster University, Ontario.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Reynolds on 19 Aug. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Kamm and Baird have produced a very sensitively written biography of the man who has a lot to answer for in midwifing the device that was to ultimately cause such social disruption over the next 75 years.
That aside, the story of Baird's life and untimely death is a fascinating one, and clearly demonstrates his great drive and enthusiasm to be at the forefront of the new technology. That history has 'done him wrong' in that regard (perhaps, in the same way it did to Philo Farnsworth, TV's other great pioneer) is largely corrected by theis very thorough work.
Fascinating, intriguing and gripping - history comes alive!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By N. MARTIN on 24 Nov. 2007
Format: Hardcover
A very interesting read, and obviously a huge amount of research has gone into the making of this book. I found that although the chapters are arranged in date order, there were many instances where the authors referred to future or past events. I found this quite confusing and would suggest that if the book is ever revised it would be helpful to have a time line at the end of each chapter - this would serve to illustrate and reinforce the chronology of the events mentioned in that chapter. I also found that the names of business associates and friends appeared that I couldn't recall reading about earlier. I must point out that there is no doubt that every person mentioned must have been previously described, and it is purely down to me not having absorbed this information. I think that I would have benefited from re-reading the book, but alas that was not possible as I had borrowed it from the library. Having previously spent 10 years in the television repair trade I was fascinated to read of Mr Baird's pioneering work.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Oct. 2002
Format: Hardcover
A very insightful history of the man whose pioneering research has had such a powerful impact on the last century and our way of life. A book not only only about the techonology but also history and our lives in the first half of the 20th century. A recommended read for everyone.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
New facts, new background information, new assessments 17 May 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The authors draw on unpublished and, in some cases, hitherto unknown material to present a comprehensive new account of the life of this enigmatic and controversial Scottish genius.
In January 1926 Baird was the first publicly to demonstrate real television. Other pioneering achievements followed, including the first transatlantic transmission, the first demonstrations of colour television and stereoscopic television, and the first video recordings. In the 1930s he twice televised the Derby, and was the first to demonstrate television technology in the cinema in both black-and-white and colour. During World War II he developed high-definition and stereoscopic television in colour, and invented the first all-electronic colour television tube. He also made significant advances in radio imaging, secret signalling, fibre optics, infra-red scanning, and fast facsimilie transmission.
Throughout his life he struggled with ill health and lack of funding, to the extent that he paid for his initial research efforts and his final, heroic, and perhaps most startling, developments out of his own pocket.
This balanced, thoroughly documented and splendidly readable account throws new light not only on Baird himself, but on many of those associated with him. Truth is separated from legend, and the facts are uncovered behind Baird's auto-biographical memoir, published in 1988 as Sermons, Soap and Television, the text of which can now be compared with a recently discovered manuscript containing his own corrections.
Fresh information is revealed about the 'lost' years in London and Hastings in the early 1920s, which includes for the first time details of the company Baird established to sell soap, his unconventional romance, and the Falkirk connection.
Special treatment is given to Baird's troubled relationship with the BBC, and in particular to the role played by the corporation's director general, Sir John Reith. There is a full account of Baird's brave efforts to establish a presence in the USA. Also disclosed is the background to the boardroom coup which resulted in Baird being relieved of his duties as managing director of the company which he had founded.
In the light of their review of existing sources and examination of fresh evidence, the authors reach several conclusions which modify or challenge received opinion. Much of the documentation of from family and other archives, including Baird's wartime letters to his friend Sydney Moseley, extracts from the private diaries of Eustace Robb (the BBC's first television producer), company memos and reports of the early 1930s, and many of the sixty photographs, has never before been published.
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