John Dee's Natural Philosophy: Between Science and Religi... and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£30.00
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
John Dee's Natural Philos... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £10.35
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

John Dee's Natural Philosophy: Between Science and Religion (Routledge Library Editions: Alchemy) Paperback – 10 Apr 2014


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£30.00
£24.56 £36.44
£30.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


Trade In this Item for up to £10.35
Trade in John Dee's Natural Philosophy: Between Science and Religion (Routledge Library Editions: Alchemy) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £10.35, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Seminal Scholarly Treatment of Dee 25 Nov. 2003
By Christopher I. Lehrich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Nick Clulee's book, now for some reason fantastically expensive, remains the seminal work on Dee. It's not an argument book, as such, but rather a brilliant overview of the great Elizabethan magus's intellectual career.
In essence, Clulee synthesizes Dee's various works into a cohesive whole, arguing that Dee wasn't a scientist on Mondays, a magus on Tuesdays, and so forth. Instead, he views the totality of Dee's work as a developing project.
Clulee's perspective is unabashedly within the history of science, but not in its old-fashioned positivist sense; he was a student of Allen G. Debus at the University of Chicago, and while he grounds his work solidly in the history of science tradition, he does not dismiss material that doesn't quite accord with modern ideas of science. This is, in fact, what makes the book so valuable: scholars like Frances Yates (to take a famous and wonderful example) draw fascinating conclusions, but sometimes stray rather far from texts; Clulee never does this, remaining locked to Dee, yet is able to build up a synthetic picture.
Good recent works on Dee, such as Harkness's book on the angel-conversations, all lean heavily on Clulee. His book is not, thus, the "last word," but it doesn't seem likely that there will be a new survey of Dee to supersede this one.
If you're interested in Dee's work from a scholarly perspective, you need to read this. Without it, you can't make much sense of Harkness, or Hakansson, or whoever. Pity it's so expensive, though -- I can't imagine why.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback