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Java Modeling in Color with UML: Enterprise Components and Process (Java Series) Textbook Binding – 15 Jun 1999


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Product details

  • Textbook Binding: 221 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1 edition (15 Jun. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 013011510X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130115102
  • Product Dimensions: 26 x 20.8 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,054,092 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

Amazon Review

The colour-printed Java Modeling in Color with UML provides four UML "archetypes" for common entities in business modelling. These have rather abstract names like the "moment-interval" and are each assigned a different colour in UML. The book uses these four archetypes to model 61 domain-specific business components for manufacturing (including suppliers and inventory control), facilities management, sales, employees and organisations plus accounting and document management.

Similar in spirit to software-design patterns these UML components are catalogued with short prose descriptions and illustrated with UML. The detail here is often impressive although the type is by necessity small. (Fortunately, the CD-ROM contains all these diagrams--including Java source code--for use within your own designs.) The authors--all experts in UML--have done the heavy lifting here. The idea is to incorporate these components within your own projects.

A catalogue of expert components, this book describes the authors' "Feature-Driven Development" (FDD) software-design process. (Although there is one UML standard, design processes still proliferate.) FDD touts good productivity with a minimum of overhead. The authors argue that it can be used productively within today's ever-shorter business cycles.

Overall this book features much more than just colour-enhanced UML. It provides a foundation of UML (and Java classes on the CD-ROM) that can model most business problems. If you design with UML you can surely benefit from this intelligent and visually savvy text. --Richard Dragan

From the Publisher

Summary and Table of contents
A revolutionary new book from Peter Coad and Eric Lefevre which, for the first time ever, uses color as part of a modeling and design methodology. Coad and Lefevre build ready-to-use templaates and models in Java which can be applied across the key business activities in a number of industries, from banking to retail. The unique color-coding concept adds a level of understandability and impact to object modeling which has heretofore never been tapped.

CONTENTS

1. Archetypes, Color, and the Domain-Neutral Component.

Archetypes. Color. The Four Archetypes in Color. Given a Class, What's the Color, What's the Archetype? The Domain-Neutral Component. Interactions Within the Domain-Neutral Component. Component Connectivity. Twelve Compound Components. Suggested Reading Paths. Summary.

2. Make or Buy.

Material-Resource Management. Facility Management. Manufacturing Management. Inventory Management.

3. Sell.

Product-Sale Management. Cash-Sale Management. Customer-Account Management.

4. Relate.

Human Resource Management. Relationship Management.

5. Coordinate and Support.

Project-Activity Management. Accounting Management. Document Management.

6. Feature-Driven Development.

The Problem: Accommodating Shorter and Shorter Business Cycles. The Solution: Feature-Driven Development. Defining Feature Sets and Features. Establishing a Process: Why and How. The Five Processes within FDD. Chief Programmers, Class Owners, and Feature Teams. Tracking Progress with Precision. Summary and Conclusion.

Appendix A: Archetypes in color. Appendix B: modeling tips. Appendix C: Notation. Index.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Aug. 1999
Format: Textbook Binding
This book is strange in that I can understand the poor ratings it has got and the good ratings. It is like 3 books in one with the middle book being the meat of it. The first book is one chapter on the color and archetypes. This work is fascinating and takes modeling to a new level. Just being introduced to this idea is worthy of 5 stars. The last book is one chapter on process. The ideas presented here are also fascinating, but like the color chapter, it is one chapter only and requires a few reads for it all to sink in. The material and ideas presented are really deep, but are well worth the effort to understand and then learn. This really feels like breakthrough work. The middle chapters are numerous models for different domains using the color and archetypes from chapter one. This is like reference material.
This book is at least 3 books in one. If you are a serious modeler or process person, you must have this book. If you are one of the many who just get by in computing, you'll not understand it and write a very negative review.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Aug. 1999
Format: Textbook Binding
I think this book shows a very novel way of approaching OO Design work. In teaching OO design at the consulting firm for which I work, I am always looking for good books to point the students at. This one does a fine job of teaching good design practices and shows novel methods for easily determining a class' purpose when a developer glances at a UML diagram. This book, when used in conjunction with the patterns books by Mr. Coad, and the Gang of Four, can help bring a novice OO designer up to speed very quickly.
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Format: Textbook Binding
This book introduces both 'modeling in color' and 'feature-driven development', two techniques I have used and taught now for a number of years.

The book actually contains very little that is exclusively about working in Java. The important object modeling techniques described are just as relevant to any other mainstream object-oriented programming language, such as C#, VB.Net, Delphi, and C++, as they are to Java.

The UML notation is used throughout the book to communicate examples and model fragments but there is very little discussion about UML itself.

Therefore, the title is somewhat misleading and the Java and UML bits are frequently dropped when referring to the book. It and the the analysis and design technique described within it, have come to be known as just 'Modeling in Color'.

It might be argued that the use of colour is also of secondary importance to that of modeling with the four class archetypes described in the book. However, the modelling in colour name has stuck and the use of colour in this way is hugely helpful when learning and applying the technique. This is especially true when working with team members that are not familiar with object modeling and might ordinarily be discouraged by the idea of using UML notation.

The material in the book builds on work described in Peter Coad's previous books and was inspired by work done with Peter on a project in Singapore where co-author Jeff De Luca was the project manager.

The first chapter of the book introduces the modelling in colour technique.

The complementary process, Feature-Driven Development, invented by co-author Jeff De Luca for the same project in Singapore is introduced in the final chapter of the book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Jun. 1999
Format: Textbook Binding
This book claims to teach you how to produce better models, faster - and it does!
I went for a job interview. The interviewer asked me to model a payroll system and gave me an hour to work it out while he observed. So I built a model using pink moment-intervals, yellow roles, green things, and blue descriptions--classes, attributes, links, methods, interactions. After 25 minutes the interviewer stopped me, saying I had already gone well beyond what others struggle to do in a full hour! So my recommendation is: read this book! It's made me, a better modeler and I'm sure it will do the same for you.
Another great innovation in this book, is Feature Driven Development. Its been used on a huge Java project. I am currently trying it on a medium sized eCommerce project which is Object-Relational and uses Java and PL/SQL and it works equally well.
The key to FDD is that it is a low overhead method which was designed by developers for development. It scales easily from large to small projects , in a remarkably linear fashion, whilst providing the finest grained and most accurate project tracking and reporting that I have ever seen in almost 18 years in the business.
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