• RRP: £22.50
  • You Save: £3.02 (13%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Java 1.5 Tiger: A Develop... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Java 1.5 Tiger: A Developer's Notebook Paperback – 5 Jul 2004


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.48
£9.40 £0.01
£19.48 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product details

  • Paperback: 202 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (5 July 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596007388
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596007386
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.3 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,118,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

In all, this book does a good job of introducing Tiger in all of its glory. For a fast but effective introduction to this new generation of Java, this is highly recommended.? ? Pan Pantziarka, Application Development Advisor, Jan 05

About the Author

Brett McLaughlin is a bestselling and award-winning non-fiction author. His books on computer programming, home theater, and analysis and design have sold in excess of 100,000 copies. He has been writing, editing, and producing technical books for nearly a decade, and is as comfortable in front of a word processor as he is behind a guitar, chasing his two sons and his daughter around the house, or laughing at reruns of Arrested Development with his wife.

Brett spends most of his time these days on cognitive theory, codifying and expanding on the learning principles that shaped the Head First series into a bestselling phenomenon. He's curious about how humans best learn, why Star Wars was so formulaic and still so successful, and is adamant that a good video game is the most effective learning paradigm we have.

David Flanagan is a computer programmer who spends most of his time writing about JavaScript and Java. His books with O'Reilly include Java in a Nutshell, Java Examples in a Nutshell, Java Foundation Classes in a Nutshell, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, and JavaScript Pocket Reference. David has a degree in computer science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He lives with his wife and children in the U.S. Pacific Northwest bewteen the cities of Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia. David has a blog at www.davidflanagan.com.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "russellmiles@mac.com" on 29 July 2004
Format: Paperback
I have found this latest addition to the 'Developer's Notebook' series to give me exactly what I'm looking for in terms of a very fast introduction to the new and important features of the upcoming Java release.
In the past I've been bogged down with the all encompassing tombs that cover every feature of the language as it's been updated. Not to knock those books too hard, they have their place and I'd not be without them, but with the advent of the Developer's Notebook series experienced developers can get the types of information, to hand immediately, that we have been crying out for and this one on the new features of Java 1.5 Tiger is no exception.
I'd recommend this book to any developer who has been using Java for a while and is looking forward to harnessing the new features of the language as quickly as possible.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Filippo Diotalevi on 6 Dec 2004
Format: Paperback
This is the first book of the "O'Reilly Developer's Notebook" I read, and I must confess that I feel very confortable with this new concise and straight-to-the-point format. The book (170 pages length), written by the java best seller author Brett McLaughlin and David Flanagan, can be read in a weekend and has the great merit of being able to illustrate you all the new features introduced by Sun with JDK 1.5.
Some parts are really only introductions, because they try to cover huge subjects, like generics or the new java.util.concurrent package, but there are really a lot of informations, details and code snippets in this little book.
I particularly appreciated the fact that the author shows both pros and cons of new features, highlighting both what is good and what is odd or questionable in the new release of Java.
I think it is a good buy, especially for professionals who don't have the time to read thousands of pages but want to learn quickly what's new in Java 5.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 13 April 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not at all a notebook; I was expecting concise outlines of the new features, some appropriate examples and some hints and tips and gotchas and workarounds, as you would expect in a developers notebook.
Instead this is more a "Chatty Introduction to 1.5 for 1.4 users". Everything is "one of the coolest features" and examples "will look wierd to you but don't worry, it's cool". I found these unnecessary asides distracting and annoying, but it's better than the overblown technicalise used in many books. There is no doubt that reading it was easy - it took me a few hours to go through the whole thing and still get a grasp on the new features.
Not suitable as a reference book (which my 'developers notebook' is!) but a well presented introduction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
If you are looking to get to know the new features of Java 5, and like most of us are short of time, trust me, this is the book for you. Concise, clear and precise; very helpful in understanding the basics of generics, autoboxing, varargs and all the tonnes of new features that the Java 5 has introduced.

Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I keep 5-6 vital books on my desk so they are near to hand and the rest are read once and are up on the shelf. This is one of that current 6 books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback