FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Jarhead: A Solder's Story... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Jarhead: A Solder's Story of Modern War Paperback – 3 Jan 2006

20 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£2.40 £0.01
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

Jarhead: A Solder's Story of Modern War + Catch-22
Price For Both: £14.28

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; Film tie-in edition edition (3 Jan. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743275373
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743275378
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 417,487 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Jonathan Shay, M.D., Ph.D.Author of "Odysseus in America" and "Achilles in Vietnam"This memoir is not pretty -- but veined with beauty. It is as outrageous, irreverent, funny, and obscene as an Aristophanes comedy, and as rich in pain and moral understanding as the "Iliad." Anthony Swofford: remember this name.

About the Author

Anthony Swofford grew up on military bases in the US and Japan, and joined the Marine Corps in 1988, aged eighteen. He was deployed to Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Shield in 1990 with the Second Battalion, 7th Marines. On leaving the Marines Swofford attended the Iowa Writers' Workshop.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. Low on 17 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
I have just finished reading Jarhead. I was a bit disappointed, as I imagine many others would be, with the lack of "action" in this book. However, Swofford has a deeper purpose than recounting a first hand account of his experience in war, and that seems to be an exploration of what it means to be a soldier in this world of modern warfare.
The first three quarters of the book are full of reminiscences. As a reader you begin to question; "when is the action going to start?" The waiting is frustrating. In the same way that you bought a book about war expecting action, Swofford was sent to Saudi Arabia to fight a war; and expected action. The book wouldn't be what it is without the build up to the final action. The action, the "war", that is finally described is over very quickly.
I found the last 50 pages of the book refreshingly honest and disturbing. Swofford is honest about the hollwness he feels after serving. "You consider yourself less of a marine and even less of a man for not having killed while in combat". The years of training, the months of waiting....all must have seemed wothless at the end.
What is disturbing is the sense of how war can effect the mind.
Read it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By orbit_ing on 20 April 2003
Format: Hardcover
Swofford’s memoirs are dark, brutal and gripping. They read neither as a recruiting card for the USMC or glorious tales of battle, rather the story of young enthusiastic men spat out the other side of conflict and the Marines all the more cynical from their experiences. Riddled with dark humour and tempered with the stark realties of warfare, I guarantee you will not debate any conflict quite as flippantly after reading this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Siriam TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 Feb. 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The initial advert for this book highlighted that here at last was a book written by a US marine who could string more than two sentences together. Do not be put off by such badging of an intriguing inside story of a willing entrant to the US army's infantry forces who came from a military family, progressed to the sniper units which are the Marine's elite forces and then participated in the first and brief Gulf War.
What this book captures so convincingly is the sheer tedium of military life and the war for the footsoldiers involved rather than the Hollywood images that distort what really happens. In its early stages on early training etc the book is like the movie Full Metal Jacket in words, with the sheer brutality and discipline enforced to turn green recruits into soldiers on autopilot when required but often unable to turn that skill off, especially when getting into fights on leave or after leaving the forces.
Where this book neatly twists the normal soldier's tale and in so doing exceeds one expectations is how it communicates the growing disillusionment of the writer as time passes. Whether it is getting screwed over what the recruiting sergeant told him versus what military life is really like and the actual Gulf War where apart from one brilliantly described secret surveillance mission, the prior time spent in the desert preparing and the complete absence of using his sniper skills during the fighting, blow away the action image conveyed by the media at the time.
One suspects not too many comparable books of such quality will emanate from the more recent and longer second Gulf War
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Hall on 27 Jun. 2003
Format: Hardcover
A gloves-off recounting of one Marine's journey from recruit to veteran. Swofford was an intelligent, bookreading Marine, unlike so many of the simple fighters around him. By his own account, he hated what the Corps made him, yet admits that his post-service life entailed in part a slippage from the keen edge the Corps honed him to.
The narrative flow is all chopped up into flash-forwards, flash-backs, and whatnot. This is completely unnecessary, as Swofford's story is compelling enough to be told straight. Maybe the editors insisted on shuffling the story, in order to keep the attention of video-impaired Gen-X readers.
Memoirs by bitter ex-soldiers are nothing new, not even in America. What makes this more than a big Bronx cheer at the military is Swofford's evident intelligence and powers of observation--sniper skills that just happened to translate into book-writing talent. A Marine who reads Nietzsche in a bar and The Iliad in the desert? We're lucky he survived. And the fact that he thinks the war was all a put-up job, all about oil, is no barrier to granting him a hearing. (I doubt that he runs everywhere in his home town of Portland.)
Since the book is a jumble of vignettes, it's no sin to pick out the best ones. Years after being discharged, he goes on a bender with a former comrade. They drink and run and sing cadence and slap each other around, drunkenly angry at each other "for changing, for slipping". He gets into an argument with some German tourists about Desert Storm not being a "real" war. He answers that the significance of the war won't be known for years, and that he underwent hardship, uglines, and terror and saw death, just like every other frontline soldier in any war. He idly threatens a comrade with death, at sadistic length, for getting Swofford in trouble.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Killinski on 14 April 2003
Format: Hardcover
Once a member of the U.S Marines Surveillance and Target Acquisition Platoon, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, Anthony Swofford studies himself with the same intensity and relentlessness as he would have a potential target. Jarhead is an historical from the heart, through the scope account of not only his involvement in the 1991 Gulf War, but of the 20 year old Scout/Sniper he was. The chronicle is his attempt to explain himself and his part in the conflict by examining the mind, surrounding events and history of this young man in the most intense and compelling of styles.
This unrelenting, intimate and painfully truthful memoir spans the time and space of Swofford’s life. There is no hesitation, nothing held sacred or in reserve as he draws from experiences both pre and post war, analysing and dissecting the man he was and the man he is by describing in vivid prose the history of “Swoff”. Locations span the globe from bars to barracks, with stories comedic to deeply upsetting – many memories long buried unearthed that are instrumental in the enlightenment of both himself and the reader as to what it is to be a modern day warrior in action.
The language used in Jarhead is poetic. There are no sonnets and rhymes – rather the sighing reflective melancholy is beautifully illustrated by a barrage of some of the most creative strings of expletives imaginable. Swofford occasionally takes a back seat in telling tales, allowing events to speak for themselves and often with these events come a mixture of inspired profanity coupled with a vocabulary more extensive and intelligent than is commonplace in the war memoir genre. The language used creates a clear voice. A voice which enables the reader to paint a vivid mental picture of both image and sound.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback