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Japanese Students at Cambridge University in the Meiji Era, 1868-1912: Pioneers for the Modernization of Japan [Paperback]

Noboru Koyama , Ian Ruxton
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
RRP: 18.03
Price: 15.33 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

3 Sep 2004
This book was first written in Japanese by Noboru Koyama, and published in Tokyo in 1999. It has been translated by Ian Ruxton, and the copyright is held by the author and translator jointly. This fascinating story, centred on the first Japanese graduate of Cambridge (Kikuchi Dairoku), is intimately connected with Japan's modernization (for which read Westernization). It is told here for the first time in English, and should be of interest to all students of the Meiji era in Japan. The book includes nine black & white images, an introduction, a preface, seven appendices and an index.

Product details

  • Paperback: 235 pages
  • Publisher: Lulu.com (3 Sep 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1411612566
  • ISBN-13: 978-1411612563
  • Product Dimensions: 27.9 x 21.1 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,613,176 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
During the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) on November 4, 1904 (Meiji 37) the London Times, that distinguished newspaper of Japan's ally Britain, published an article titled 'Japan and English Universities'. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diligence in Application 20 Aug 2005
Format:Paperback
On the surface, this book could be said to be aimed at a specialist market, as it centres on Japanese students studying at Cambridge in the days of the British Empire. This was with the ironic view of the prevention of Western Imperialism stretching to their shores, and the adapting and embracing of many inherent values, to strengthen their own empire. So, yes, it's specialist in this sense, but the way the introduction and the contents have been written and explained, ( with perhaps traditional Japanese efficiency ), makes it a very interesting and very informative read for all who can show at least a little concentration of something 'a little on the heavy side'.

As a bonus, because of the data-intensive contents, interesting snippets such as the different reigns and even much of the Japanese Calendar is here. Ultimately, it may not be for you, but you will be impressed by an absolutely staggering start, devoid of over-heavy grammar which accompanies many similar tomes. Very, very well done, Ian Ruxton.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
As a language teacher, I can appreciate the time spent on translating this old literary giant, Ian has made this difficult subject open to the masses in a way that even those with limited interest in the subject can read and appreciate. It is well written originally, well translated, and Ian has displayed exceptional talent in his field. I was impressed with the ease of which the reader is drawn in and becomes interested.
Well Done.
Angela Hooper, author of In Dark Minds
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5.0 out of 5 stars Translator's comments 11 Oct 2004
Format:Paperback
This book is a translation from a Japanese original which is available from amazon.co.jp. I was delighted when the author Noboru Koyama agreed to my producing this English version. Mr. Koyama is head of the Japanese department at Cambridge University Library, and has access to all the relevant materials and documents in Japanese and English. While the central character is Kikuchi Dairoku, who later became President of Tokyo Imperial University, Minister of Education and the first President of the Science Research Institute of Japan (modelled on the Cavendish laboratory at Cambridge), there are many others who appear, including statesman Suematsu Kencho, diplomat Inagaki Manjiro and Professor Donald MacAlister. For those who wish to know more about how Japan achieved a startlingly rapid modernization in the Meiji era, this book will be both informative and instructive.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Rare Glimpse 8 Dec 2004
By Robert W. Long III - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Ian Ruxton has written about an area that is little researched in contemporary history--the first intercultural student exchange between Japan and Britain. The book provides such detail that the characters come to life through their letters and responses to problems, love, and to the academic challenges of the time. Most readers will readily appreciate how both the Japanese and British benefited from this exchange, and as a result, it reminds us of the importance of such exchanges today. We see that some issues and problems will always be with us in such intercultural exchanges---finding financial assistance, dealing with intercultural romance, and simply getting people back "home" to accept the changes in views, values, and ideas that come from being abroad. In short, if one wants to see and read about a rare and human part of history, then read this book.

Robert W. Long III
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well translated, a good read 5 Dec 2004
By A. HOOPER - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
As a language teacher, I can appreciate the time spent on translating this old literary giant, Ian has made this difficult subject open to the masses in a way that even those with limited interest in the subject can read and appreciate. It is well written originally, well translated, and Ian has displayed exceptional talent in his field. I was impressed with the ease of which the reader is drawn in and becomes interested.

Well Done.

Angela Hooper, author of In Dark Minds
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended for anyone interested in our very small world 23 Feb 2005
By Charlie F. Sigrist - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This wonderful translation of a Japanese classic, reinforces the importance of connection and understanding between cultures. Especially important as our world continues to shrink, acknowledging the skills and accomplishments of another without diminishing our own, is a diplomatic skill too rare in today's cross cultural politics. A scholarly work written and translated with a most human voice.

Mary Sigrist USA/Ireland
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cultural Bonds Between Japan and Britain 4 May 2009
By Neddy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This outstanding translation from Japanese gives English readers an opportunity to learn about young Japanese geniuses, such as Kikuchi Dairoku, who were sent by their country to study at Cambridge and ended up modernizing Japan. It is a scholarly work that has been translated into a most human read that fascinated me and added greatly to my knowledge of the industrialization of Japan in the 19th century. It is fortunate for today's world, that when Japan sought to modernize, she looked to such an enlightened nation as Britain for a role model. As a result, a strong cultural bond was formed between the two cultures which this book explores. The author dedicated his heart and mind to this tribute to those enlightened Japanese youths, and his work has been made accessible to the world with Ian Ruxton's ability to translate Japanese into good English prose.

Edna Barney - [...]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diligence in Application 24 Aug 2005
By Mr. J. M. Haines - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
On the surface, this book could be said to be aimed at a specialist market, as it centres on Japanese students studying at Cambridge in the days of the British Empire. This was with the ironic view of the prevention of Western Imperialism stretching to their shores, and the adapting and embracing of many inherent values, to strengthen their own empire. So, yes, it's specialist in this sense, but the way the introduction and the contents have been written and explained, ( with perhaps traditional Japanese efficiency ), makes it a very interesting and very informative read for all who can show at least a little concentration of something 'a little on the heavy side'.

As a bonus, because of the data-intensive contents, interesting snippets such as the different reigns and even much of the Japanese Calendar is here. Ultimately, it may not be for you, but you will be impressed by an absolutely staggering start, devoid of over-heavy grammar which accompanies many similar tomes. Very, very well done, Ian Ruxton.
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