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Janácek: Glagolitic Mass; The Diary Of One Who Disappeared
 
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Janácek: Glagolitic Mass; The Diary Of One Who Disappeared

19 Sept. 2003 | Format: MP3

£5.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £6.75 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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6:35
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1:36
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0:45
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0:36
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1:35
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0:53
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3:48
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1:09
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2:32
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2002
  • Release Date: 19 Sept. 2003
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 2002 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:10:36
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N23JOS
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,104 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 13 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Janacek avoided churches; in his view, they were charnel-houses in everything but name. This is understandable in some ways. With so many hustlers in circulation - be they plumed in business-suits or vestments - there is every reason to be wary. Even so, what a luminous work this is. While Jancek is in Glossolalia mode, his genius is subordinate to the Trinitarian mystery: this is a liturgy. One does not need the libretto to decipher what text is being addressed by the score. The organ interludes sound like they are being played by a madman at the keyboard - where is the cackle? - but Energy is Eternal Delight and they're great fun all the same. Equally, the Dona Nobile Pacem is boisterous in its gait. And surely Janacek knew his Bruckner - how else does one explain the pulse behind the Sanctus - or else they drew their inspiration from the same wellspring.

Kubelik is masterful. He holds the shebang together by sheer willpower and composure. Presumably he knows what he is doing when he emphasizes one syllable over another. He is unhurried. Nor is the reverence lost in the calculated cacophony. Evelyn Lear is squally enough to attract the attention of the SS Cutty Sark but here she is far from ineffective: in the Gloria, against all odds, she bestills Creation. The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra are punchy and idiomatic.

I do not aspire to be a German-speaking Eliza Doolittle so the diction lesson that is `The Diary of One Who Vanished' is lost on me. As I understand it, phonetics is all important in Janacek and surely this work should be sung in its original language. Moreover, why would anyone want to underwrite Teutonic imperialism - surely the world has seen enough of that!

The remastering is beneficial, adding extra warmth to a recording that has weathered time stoutly.

Gun stuff.
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6 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on 15 Nov. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Janacek's music is extremely post-stravinskian with yet a constant reference to an old Slavonic tradition. The introduction is powerfully dominated by the wind instruments but is kind of dubitative, suspended, sad even, unsure for sure. The Kyrie reestablishes vibrant optimism. The soprano takes us into this mood and when the Gloria comes, neurotic, escaping an invisible and un-understandable danger, when it turns into a chase or maybe a procession rhythmically pushed forward by percussions and strings, we try to forget the choir that sounds more menacing than the solace of a great mass of helpful souls. The Credo then explodes like a confrontation to the impossible conquest of the faith and fate a Christian would like to have and control. In front of us we meet with power, strength, force and we either run away from or join the procession, the parade, the pilgrimage to conquer evil and hell, to sweep the earth into the pocket of God and his glory and pompous etiquette, the etiquette of more sobriety of male voices, of a bass that could be deeper but is very expressive of the dark depth of our mind, of our spirit, the dark suffering of our being. The orchestra relays the bass and makes us climb back to the surface, to the sky, note after note, grade after grade, degree after degree to reach a vast open space in which the choir becomes angelic. But this time the orchestra leads us slowly down to wrap us up in some powerful voice and instrument fabric that is both thick and supportive. The Sanctus could have been some peaceful moment but the voices take over and it becomes some impressive prodding along the way with sounds that could come from some lay and worldly feast or village maypole celebration.Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Slava! 19 Sept. 2008
By Sungu Okan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This recording of Glagolitic Mass, is really the best! Rafael Kubelik, who is the master of Czech music already, performed this masterwork of Janacek so brilliant. Every note, every detail can be hear so clear with such a purity, and by the way, with really dramatic feeling. I love the spontaneity in every Kubelik performances.

As you know, Janacek was not a believer, he was a pantheist, and according to him, that Mass actually "concentrated on the death" in his own words. The music has a really black atmosphere, you can feel really how the death can explain terrific in music. Just listen the spine-chilling Organ solo, there you will find the terror. Just after that movement orchestra plays a turbulent, flamboyant finale called "Intrada" (curious) and finishes suddenly in timpani strokes. In Veruju (Credo) there is a dramatic scene explains the Cruxify of Jesus and the ressurection, it's just terrific. In Slava (Gloria) there are some jubilant moments with the bells and glorious sounds of brass section. And the most mysterious movement, Agnece Bozij (Agnus Dei), it's just like a scene of a dying man, who is living his las moments... The orchestra plays with sordino, and chorus just praying in desolate mood.

In that recording, the solo quartet is really dream-cast! With her pure sound Evely Lear, with her warm sound Rössl-Majdan, with such a presice declamation Ernest Haefliger, and with his impressive profondo sound Franz Crass. And the Chorus of Bayerischen-Rundfunks really get that music succesfully, even there is a difficulty about the Glagolitic language.

A msut have. It is highly recommended.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A vintage Glagolitic Mass, and sitll one of the best 21 Sept. 2006
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Stress and strain are built into Janacek's Glagolitic Mass, where much of the vocalism verges on the brink of screaming. Most recordings wander over the edge, but in this, one of the original versions in stereo, Kubelik chose world-class singers from Germany, Switzerland, and America, and they reduce the shrieks to a minimum. Evelyn Lear, in fact, accomplishes wonders staying in tune without shosuting, and tenor Ernst Haeflier is just as good. The chorus sits a bit too far back, as does the orchestra, but Kubelik has a sure hand, and this lyrical reading remains one of the best.

As a bonus we get Haefliger's vintage recording of The Diary of One Who Vanished, but it's consierably hampered by being sung in german instead of Czech. Otherwise, the singing and piano accompaniment are lovely, stylish, and just a bit too calm.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
From the Houses of the Dead - and Diction 13 Jun. 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Janacek avoided churches; in his view, they were charnel-houses in everything but name. This is understandable in some ways. With so many hustlers in circulation - be they plumed in business-suits or vestments - there is every reason to be wary. Even so, what a luminous work this is. While Jancek is in Glossolalia mode, his genius is subordinate to the Trinitarian mystery: this is a liturgy. One does not need the libretto to decipher what text is being addressed by the score. The organ interludes sound like they are being played by a madman at the keyboard - where is the cackle? - but Energy is Eternal Delight and they're great fun all the same. Equally, the Dona Nobile Pacem is boisterous in its gait. And surely Janacek knew his Bruckner - how else does one explain the pulse behind the Sanctus - or else they drew their inspiration from the same wellspring.

Kubelik is masterful. He holds the shebang together by sheer willpower and composure. Presumably he knows what he is doing when he emphasizes one syllable over another. He is unhurried. Nor is the reverence lost in the calculated cacophony. Evelyn Lear is squally enough to attract the attention of the SS Cutty Sark but here she is far from ineffective: in the Gloria, against all odds, she bestills Creation. The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra are punchy and idiomatic.

I do not aspire to be a German-speaking Eliza Doolittle so the diction lesson that is `The Diary of One Who Vanished' is lost on me. As I understand it, phonetics is all important in Janacek and surely this work should be sung in its original language. Moreover, why would anyone want to underwrite Teutonic imperialism - surely the world has seen enough of that!

The remastering is beneficial, adding extra warmth to a recording that has weathered time stoutly.

Gun stuff.
5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Divine is the very nature of humanity 15 Nov. 2006
By Jacques COULARDEAU - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Janacek's music is extremely post-stravinskian with yet a constant reference to an old Slavonic tradition. The introduction is powerfully dominated by the wind instruments but is kind of dubitative, suspended, sad even, unsure for sure. The Kyrie reestablishes vibrant optimism. The soprano takes us into this mood and when the Gloria comes, neurotic, escaping an invisible and un-understandable danger, when it turns into a chase or maybe a procession rhythmically pushed forward by percussions and strings, we try to forget the choir that sounds more menacing than the solace of a great mass of helpful souls.

The Credo then explodes like a confrontation to the impossible conquest of the faith and fate a Christian would like to have and control. In front of us we meet with power, strength, force and we either run away from or join the procession, the parade, the pilgrimage to conquer evil and hell, to sweep the earth into the pocket of God and his glory and pompous etiquette, the etiquette of more sobriety of male voices, of a bass that could be deeper but is very expressive of the dark depth of our mind, of our spirit, the dark suffering of our being.

The orchestra relays the bass and makes us climb back to the surface, to the sky, note after note, grade after grade, degree after degree to reach a vast open space in which the choir becomes angelic. But this time the orchestra leads us slowly down to wrap us up in some powerful voice and instrument fabric that is both thick and supportive. The Sanctus could have been some peaceful moment but the voices take over and it becomes some impressive prodding along the way with sounds that could come from some lay and worldly feast or village maypole celebration. This Sanctus sounds definitely secular with a few extremely harmonic small musical sentences repeated slightly too many times to punctuate our world, or the vision we have of it.

His Osanna is nearly a song of joy and victory. Victory upon our inner disturbed and uncertain world that comes back at the beginning of the Agnus Dei, but not for long. The sound straightjacket of the choir takes over and straps us up in a mass in which our own self can be kneaded till it dissolves in some kind of communion. But communion with what ? The organ then takes over and explodes like the voice of the living universe we have finally reached with our five or maybe, probably, six senses.

Doubt has disappeared to give way to those deafening pipes that set us the example of a totally dominated neurosis that does not question or investigate anymore but enjoys the contradictions it feels as if they were a fulfillment, a privilege, an emblem if not an icon of our divine nature. The Intrada teaches us then the bliss of that communion with God that provides us with the equilibrium and balance of the antagons of the voices or the various instruments. Harmonic equilibrium is thus our divine fate in a life of stachotic psychotic distortion and dispersion.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU
6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Can I Give It 10 Stars? 2 Dec. 2007
By Philippe Landry - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Take every other recording of the Mssa Glagolskaja and melt them down into something more useful: This is the ONLY one you'll ever need. How can you even speak of another recording after listening to this version. Kubelik is some sort of magus. There is not one flaw to this reading. And the work itself? Janacek is a genius. From start to finish the Mssa is the physical manifestation of an odyssey. Buy, unwrap it, put it in your stereo and listen to it. Feel the power! God gave you ears for a reason.
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