More Options
James Brown Live At The Apollo, 1962
 
See larger image
 

James Brown Live At The Apollo, 1962

31 July 1990 | Format: MP3

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
1:48
30
2
2:05
30
3
2:14
30
4
0:12
30
5
1:45
30
6
0:12
30
7
2:27
30
8
0:11
30
9
10:43
30
10
6:27
30
11
3:26

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 9 July 1990
  • Release Date: 9 July 1990
  • Label: Polydor Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1963 Universal Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 31:30
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KW7B9A
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,444 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dangerous Dave TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 Oct 2011
Format: Audio CD
Every time I hear an ad on the box for "(Any current British comic) at the Apollo" I groan a little inwardly. To me the Apollo was THE venue in New York for black performers of popular music. To quote Wikipedia, "The Apollo Theater in New York City is one of the most famous music halls in the United States, and the most famous club associated almost exclusively with Black performers". This is what the Apollo really means and this is how history will see it.

More specifically I think of this album.

As a near slavish follower - I can admit it now! - of the new cult of R&B in the mid 60's I was one of that fairly small number who bought this one on vinyl . And I'll further admit that I had mixed feelings about it. To anyone used to the more familiar soul artists - Cooke, Burke, Pickett, Redding - this was much more extreme. It was also the first time we'd heard such a show live so the showbiz aspects of the intros and the playing to the audience, were new to us. Some of us would have seen some of the touring rockers from the US but none of these performances had been committed to wax (apart from Jerry Lee's great gig at the Star Club, Hamburg, though the album which committed that to posterity wasn't to come out till `64).

Another part of my hesitant reaction to the album was near total lack of familiarity with the material it contained. Apart from Mike Raven playing the Godfather of Soul, no one on the radio played him (it didn't help that hardly any of his records had come out in the UK either). Mind you it didn't take long for the passion and intensity to win me over - I found that turning the volume up did help!
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By R. Burin on 10 Nov 2002
Format: Audio CD
Oddly unsung in Britain despite it's status as James Brown's bestselling record, 'Live at Apollo' disappoints only in it's sub-40 minute running time. Recorded when he was a raw talent, rather than an established name, the record showcases his phenomenal voice perfectly. Like Sam Cooke's 'Live at Harlem Sq. Club' (which is even better), the singer is shown in context- not softened by studio production, but in his element- giving it his all in front of a notoriously difficult audience, which he soon wins over. Fats Gonder's oft-parodied and/or homaged introduction is wisely included, and the first three numbers sound great. It is with 'Lost Someone', though, that James Brown finds his voice. "I feel so I good I wanna scream!", he shouts, "I feel just like I wanna scream!". "Go ahead and scream!", comes the reply.
"OOOWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW!"
And in that moment James Brown moved from flavour-of-the-month to soul legend. The record met with extraordinary success in America, in both critical and commercial terms, and was lauded by Britain's New Musical Express, some thirty years on, as the '30th Greatest Record of All Time'. Strange then, that few supposed soul afficionados I've spoken to are aware of this record's existence, let alone it's genius. When 'Live at Apollo' was recorded, James Brown was a man at the peak of his powers, if not of his public recognition- and it shows. If 'Night Train' is a slightly low-key closer, the medley which precedes it more than compensates- a lust-filled, yearning, aching nine-minute medley of rare quality. One of THE great soul records, a priceless artefact, and for many, an undiscovered gem.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By GlynLuke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 July 2014
Format: Audio CD
At school in the sixties I was the singer in a group (we didn`t really call them bands then) and among our small repertoire, which included the blues My Babe, the Stones' Satisfaction, and the Beatles' You`ve Got To Hide Your Love Away, we did a version of I`ll Go Crazy - which I think we must have got from the Denny Laine-era
Moody Blues. I can honestly say that my rendition fell somewhat short of that of James Brown on this astounding, if brief, live classic recorded at the Harlem Apollo in 1962.
But then, how couldn`t it fall short? This man, as the comprehensive notes in the excellent booklet that comes with this reissue tell us, really could sing!
Most of the tracks are quite short, except for a medley which includes a wonderful version of I Love You, Yes I do, and the highlight of the half-hour set, a glorious and soul-oozing, improvisatory ten-minute Lost Someone, during which Brown proves he was then and remained a law unto himself, and one hell of a tremendous soul singer.
You`re inevitably left wanting more, but put this on as loud as you can get away with, and you`ll be pretty exhausted after thirty minutes of James Brown howling like a righteous banshee - but always in tune! - so much so that Wilson Pickett or Eddie Floyd would seem like a refreshing lowering of temperature.
It`s the live atmosphere that does it too. JB rarely came across in the studio quite like he does here, responding to an excited, rapturous captive audience on that cold night in October 1962.

I just wish I could have been there. This is the next best thing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Mar 2004
Format: Audio CD
Nobody, not I, nor any other music reviewer, can really do justice to this recording. It is without doubt one of the greatest live recordings ever made, and has of the most emotional, vibrant and soul seeking vocal performances, you will ever hear. It will take you to new limits in your understanding of music...it will expose feelings you never knew you could feel for music...and it may make you cry.It did me...
Just follow these instructions;
1)Buy CD
2)Listen...then wonder what the fuss is about.
3)Listen again.
4)Clear your house of wife, kids and take phones off hook. Turn off lights, and play LOUD.
The result will astound you. You owe it to yourself...BUY IT!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category