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JPod Paperback – 4 Jun 2007


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Frequently Bought Together

JPod + Microserfs + Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture
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Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; New edition edition (4 Jun 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747585873
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747585879
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 162,737 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'Very funny' Sunday Times 'A blackly comic tale of life in the age of Google, and it's Coupland's best book in years ... A wonderfully inventive book, fizzing with wit and black humour' Image 'The perfect vehicle for his funny and poignant evocations of near-term nostalgia ... there is brilliance at work in JPod. Not to mention more LOLs than you could shake a bong at' Los Angeles Times 'A dazzling comic novel, confirming that there is on current form no funnier novelist writing in English' Literary Review

From the Publisher

This is a special Limited edition of 3000 copies.
Each hardback copy is signed by the author and comes in a presentation case together with one of six cube figures based on the characters from J-pod, and manufactured by the cubepeople, Characters include;
Ethan,Bree,John Doe,Cowboy,Kaitlin and Evil Mark.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ingaborga on 10 Jun 2007
Format: Paperback
In keeping with some of the reviews here, I see this novel as a short story unnecessarily stretched out into a novel. In fact, take away the endless (and endlessly irritating) pages of numbers, slogans and streams of consciousness and you'd probably have a fairly readable novella. In many ways a sequel to Microserfs (although no where near as good) JPod follows a similar plotline - the lives and loves of a group of geeky co-workers, and in many respects it is as if Coupland is writing on auto pilot. There is even a romance between two of the main characters that is extremely reminiscent of Microserfs. Coupland himself appears as a central character in the novel, which some have seen as a vanity too far but which is more likely a slightly clumsy attempt at self-referential humour. It is, after all, not unknown for novellists to appear in their own works, whether loosely disguised or as themselves. I whizzed through JPod in about four days, probably only devoting around five or six hours to it, and it certainly hasn't made as lasting an impression on me as some of Coupland's other books. But I can think of worse books to read, and even Coupland's worse novels are better than many.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Clarke on 3 Nov 2006
Format: Hardcover
Right, first off let me say I've read ALL of Couplands's novels and LOVE them dearly. I would go as far to say he's my favourite author. UNTIL NOW! I was really looking forward to this & splashed out on the Limited Edition signed box set. I wish I hadn't bothered.

This is a terrible novel and I have to confess I got so angry with it I gave up before the end (I've never done that before, ever). There is no plot. The characters are so one dimentional and undeveloped you don't care about them. The worse thing that REALLY got on my nevers, were the CONSTANT self references to Coupland - he not only name checks himself all over, but he also features as a main character - JUCK!!!

MY ADVICE IS IF YOU ARE NEW OR FAMILIER TO COUPLAND TO GIVE THIS A VERY WIDE BIRTH. IT'S JUST TRIPE! GO READ HIS WONDERFUL "GIRLFRIEND IN A COMA", ALL FAMILIES ARE PSYCHOTIC" "GENERATION X" "ELANDOR RIGBY" . . . BUT NOT THIS, PLEASE!!

Douglas: must try better!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Aug 2006
Format: Paperback
Sometimes you get a bad feeling from the first page of a book, such as when the author namedrops himself. In this case, clever Douglas Coupland.

Fortunately that bad feeling doesn't continue throughout the geek purgatory of "JPod," which can be seen as a sort of sequel to "Microserfs" -- bored, brilliant people in unfulfilling corporate jobs. It staggers at the midway point, but the corporate bizarrities are definitely worth the read.

When he's not dealing with a doomed video game, Ethan is trying to help his parents -- his pot-growing mum killed a hostile biker, and his wannabe-actor dad is having a hot affair with a sexy girl Ethan's age. To make matters worse, his brother has smugglesd illegal Chinese immigrants into his home without permission. And you thought YOUR day was bad.

Things deteriorate even more when the JPod boss develops an obsessive crush on Ethan's mother, and he ends up getting shipped to China. Now it's Ethan's job to go retrieve him, since the turtle-themed video game is being destroyed by their new manager. But getting the boss back won't be the end of his problems.

Let's get this out of the way: Coupland casts himself as a character in "JPod." Essentially it's his evil, sociopathic clone. Coupland does get credit for not making himself come across as appealing at all, but the whole sequence seems very gimmicky and artificial.

"JPod" itself is a smirky black comedy, with lots of dysfunctional characters and a a lot of all-out comic situations. In fact, he really never lets up with the comedy, with idiot bosses, lesbian mothers with lowercase names, and even a gangster born without a sense of humor. Not to mention love letters to Ronald MacDonald. Yes, the fast-food clown.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By E V Morgan on 16 Jun 2006
Format: Paperback
I became obsessed with Douglas Coupland's books when I first read Gen X, Shampoo Planet and Life After God in the space of a few weeks and have, ever since Microserfs, awaited each new one with expectations that were rarely disappointed. The overall success of his output since has varied a little, many people suggesting that he does one good then one so-so book, but the last couple - Hey Nostradamus and Eleanor Rigby - were as good as if not better than his best to date (Microserfs, in my opinion) and all of his books, however contrived the subplots and kitschy the references, had a soulfulness and poetry to them that transcended the gimmicks.

JPod is like someone lacking that humanity tried - and failed - to mimic Microserfs. It's devoid of ideas. The technology that, again, felt like a gimmick in Microserfs is now so commonplace that it's got no cachet, the family subplot is painfully unreal and not remotely touching (recall "hellojed" for a reminder of how tear-jerking he could be), the way 'Coupland' inserts himself into the story about halfway through is a poor imitation of Bret Easton Ellis and pages and pages are filled with numbers that no-one will ever read, like he ran out of oopmh and just needed to hit that word count, no questions asked.

If anyone read his recent Morrissey 'interview' for the Observer Music Monthly they should know what to expect - as that was an interview without any quotes or input from the subject, so this is a novel without any creative input or heart from the author.

I would go so far as to recommend that Coupland fans who have not yet read this book should avoid it - this is his 'Phantom Menace' and it stinks.
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