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Irish, Catholic and Scouse: Paperback – 1 Sep 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Liverpool University Press (1 Sep 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184631108X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846311086
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,066,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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No one has mastered the sources the way Belchem hasthis is a mature scholar doing his style of history about as well as it can be done. --Donald H Akenson, Queens University, Canada

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Carty on 4 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is no longer anything you could describe as a self-conscious ' Irish community' in Liverpool. Indeed, some Irish nationalists over the years had occasion to criticise the city and its inhabitants for not demonstrating the usual signs of a diaspora community. This book makes clear why that is, why this English city characterised by massive Irish immigration over many decades and with a lively sense of its diversity seems sometimes blind to its most significant ethnic group,indeed the largest single element of its population.

The reason is simple, we became the defining identity for the city: we changed the way Liverpudlians talk, both in accent/intonation and style. Listen to their intonation, the music of a group of Liverpudlians talking animatedly then what comes to mind is Dublin (with a hint of North Wales). Belchem's book is a thoroughly documented, sober account of the fortunes of the Liverpool Irish which sees the confident, if at times touchy, proletarian Scouser identity as a belated self-assertion and final revenge of the poorest strata of inner-city Irish immigrant communities.

Interestingly people in other parts of England (assuming the city itself is in England) hold prejudices concerning the city and its people which are more or less identical, for good or ill, with those traditionally held about the Irish.

TC
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Ravey on 13 Sep 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a must-read for everyone who values her/his Irish identity.....It demonstrates in scholarly way just why Liverpool's working class are so distinctive....not 'better', but distinctive. A majority of us are from the 'low Irish' tradition; many of us try to forget this our past. And many Irish in Ireland and 'thar lear'/overseas don't recognise that the Liverpool-Irish traditions is the most authentic English speaking voice of what was the majority of Irish people before the disaster of the Gorta Mór almost destroyed the Gaelic-speaking working class. This academic work - using 'technical' language often - makes me proud and has encouraged me to learn the language my class spoke before starvation, unemployment and emigration destroyed our culture.
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