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Invisibles TP #3 Entropy In The Uk Paperback – 24 Aug 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (24 Aug 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563897288
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563897283
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 1.3 x 25.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 101,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Jan 2002
Format: Paperback
WOW! I thought the series couldn't possibly get better - how wrong I was.
The Invisibles is one of those rare series where it doesn't matter which book you read first as none of them make sense - at first! Whatever you look for in a comic, you'll find it here. Great art, superlative writing, an all-guns-blazing action adventure or a deep reflection on the nature of reality and humanity.
Somehow this series (and even more remarkably, each book) packs all this in and more.
You like science fiction? You like fantasy? You like action? You like conspiracies? You like an intelligent story that makes you THINK?
If you have even a passing interest in any of the above then you should be reading The Invisibles and "Entropy in the UK" is as good a place to start as any - Trust me, you won't regret it!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 28 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback
King Mob and Lord Fanny have been kidnapped by Sir Miles and The Conspiracy and are being tortured for information on The Invisibles - will Ragged Robin, Boy and Jim Crow save them in time? Meanwhile, Jack Frost is still coming to terms with his role as saviour of humanity as the next incarnation of the Buddha, and a new member of The Invisibles is introduced who is looking for the Moonchild.

I really love Grant Morrison's writing, I do, but his Invisibles series just isn't clicking with me in the way his Batman, We3, All-Star Superman and Seaguy comics, to name just a few, do. So Entropy in the UK is the third book in the series and nearly the halfway point in the series as a whole (there are seven volumes), but I'm still having a hard time trying to give a damn about any of the characters. King Mob is tied up in a sterile lab and is being psychically interrogated by Sir Miles - and I don't care. Am I supposed to be rooting for King Mob? I suppose so, because he and the rest of the Invisibles are fighting the baddies right? But that's the only reason to care and, to be honest, it's a really flimsy one. You're basically telling the reader to like the hero because he's the hero, rather than giving the reader reasons why they should like the hero - to use the oft-repeated writing maxim, show don't tell, and there's a lot of telling in The Invisibles.

To be fair to Morrison he does continue to slowly build up other characters. In the last book it was Lord Fanny, in this book it's Boy whose backstory is revealed (and is much less convoluted than Fanny's was), but Boy is really a minor player in the book who doesn't get nearly as many pages as King Mob when we as readers should be learning more about him in order for us to actually care about what's happening to his character.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Click Click Magazine on 1 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback
The Invisibles works on many levels. One is the thread of the story, the action and the events. There are two other levels. One is the subconsious. Grant Morrison hints at patterns, events which come into play by bigger forces in the universe, and how people are playing roles in the bigger drama.

The final level of information is very specific. This volume is set in the UK, much of it in London. Deeper still, much of it is set under London. Depicting parasitic, interdimensional beings full of venom, of darkness, reaching out into our world. The chasm through to London. What is going on is more than a story.

The parasitic nature of greed in the outside world will attract bigger forces of the same kind. You could say the financial enslavement of those conducting in the city, is bringing in other enslavers from elsewhere. This is a very close depiction of energetic dynamics, of an intuitive understanding of there being some places in the world where darkness reigns. It may be hidden or masked, but in this excellent volume a bit more of it can be comprehended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
The Invisibles, Book 3: Entropy in the UK 15 Mar 2005
By Joe Kenney - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
After the sometimes-underwhelming art of the previous two collections, Phil Jimenez's artwork in the first half of Book 3 of the Invisibles is sort of like a slap to the face: vibrant, detailed, masterful. Luckily, he later became the regular artist on the series, but here he only illustrates the opening arc, a three-part saga that details King Mob's torture at the hands of Archon agents, and which also provides this volume with its title.

In a way, this is the true beginning of what the Invisibles would soon become known for: fast-paced ideas and action, and an onslaught of mysticism, fringe science, and conspiracy theories. I've never been sure if it was Jimenez's amazing artwork that lead to this, or if Morrison finally thought his readers were "ready" for the big time, but regardless, from here on out things happen, and events unfold at a maddening pace all the way until the final volume of the series.

Having been captured at the end of Book 2, Invisibles King Mob and Lord Fanny are at the mercy of Sir Miles Delacourt, straightlaced and overbearing agent of the demonic Archons. Here, finally, we get to know a bit more about King Mob, as Delacourt invades his mind and sorts through his past. This is full-on psychedelia, as King Mob attempts to defend himself in the guise of fictional character Gideon Stargrave, a mod super-spy from the `60s (and author Michael Moorcock's Jerry Cornelius in all but name; something Morrison readily admitted). This results in Delacourt waging a mental war against King Mob's psychic defenses, with the Stargrave segments providing some outrageous cross-dimensional action sequences. Very heady stuff, with lots of mystic ideas dropped, this arc is easily one of the high points of the entire series.

After this storyline, the narrative slows down for a moment as we have a single-issue peek into Boy's background. Boy, the black female martial artist Invisible, was never Morrison's strongest creation. In fact, he eventually admitted this, and basically dropped the character toward the end of the series. Therefore, her spotlight issue, "How I Became An Invisible," is probably my least favorite story in the Invisibles canon. It hints at interesting developments that later become integral to the series (shadowy government agents taking innocent black Americans prisoner, and shipping them off in mysterious trains), but Morrison ruins it all by having the characters speak in some of the most fake "black" dialog ever. You can tell he's out of his element, a Scottish writer creating "urban" dialog for inner-city black Americans. It doesn't really work.

Things get back on track after this, with the narrative picking right up after the events in the opening arc. Though King Mob and Fanny have defeated Sir Miles, they're still trapped in a building that's crawling with enemy soldiers and ultraterrestrial beings. The remaining Invisibles cell (Dane, Boy, Ragged Robin) call in reinforcements, and fellow Invisibles Jim Crow and Mr. Six show up to help. This results in a multi-issue storyline that features all sorts of high-concept action, as the Invisibles wade through hell-on-Earth protective spells and defend themselves against cancer-inducing nanoweapons.

The book ends with a single-issue look at Division X, the swaggering British counterpart of the X-Files (Mr. Six is one of the three members of Division X, incidentally). This story seemingly has nothing much to do with anything else in the series so far, until much later, when the themes brought up here are developed. The story does feature the first appearance of the impish, demonic Quimper, a frightening little creature who will cause the Invisibles much trouble in future volumes.

As mentioned, Phil Jimenez provides the art for the first half of the book, with Steve Yeowell filling in the other half. This is pleasing thematically, as Yeowell started off the series, and his finishing up the first major arc makes sense. However, I've never been the greatest fan of his work. The Boy/Division X issues are penciled by fill-in artists: one scratchy, the other Todd McFarlane-esque.

This trade paperback wraps up what was the first volume of the Invisibles comic run. After these issues, DC/Vertigo halted publication for a few months, and Morrison revised his approach to the story. After this, no longer would the story come off as methodically-paced as it had in earlier issues (the Marquis de Sade storyline in the "Say You Want a Revolution" trade in particular); instead, the series would feature nonstop action, sex, and ultraviolence. Some say this new approach was a "watered down" version of the Invisibles, but I say that's hogwash. The stories collected in this book are great, true, but the best was yet to come for the Invisibles.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The end of the beginning for THE INVISIBLES -- good reading 20 Oct 2001
By Dave Thomer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
ENTROPY IN THE UK is a thought-provoking read, and a satisfying conclusion to this first major arc in THE INVISIBLES. It balances Morrison's usual rush of madcap ideas with solid plot advancement and continued character development, as Boy and Dane question their involvement with the resistance group and Fanny and King Mob try to resist psychic interrogation and torture.
The book's opening arc, also entitled Entropy in the UK, is probably my favorite. One of the recurring themes of The Invisibles is the limits of human beings' ability to perceive their surroundings - the limitations imposed on them from the outside, and the limitations they place upon themselves. The interrogation sequence in this story is one of the finest explorations of this issue, especially in its discussion of the role of language. One of the drugs that Miles and his men pump into King Mob causes him to be unable to distinguish between a word and the concept that the word describes; as Miles uses it to warp Mob's perceptions, he talks about the limits of the English language and alphabet. It's a great sequence, one that illustrates the power of words, as well as their limits. Phil Jiminez's beautiful pencils display the dazzling, chaotic landscape of King Mob's mind and thoughts, while the narration and script lay out the dizzying ideas and mantras of the two combatants. It's very clever, very enjoyable stuff.
The rest of the book is also strong, although I preferred Jiminez's work to that of any of the other artists here -- no knock against them, as I'm a really big fan of Jiminez. Morrison wraps up some threads from SAY YOU WANT A REVOLUTION and APOCALIPSTICK, and sets a number of others into motion -- so at the end of this, you'll definitely want to keep reading with BLOODY HELL IN AMERICA.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Satisfyingly satisfying 10 Mar 2003
By Kevin RE Watts - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Entropy in the UK concludes the story told in Vol.1 through 3. And what an ending it is...
Broken down into parts, the first 3 issues detail the torture of King Mob, and his interesting way to counteract it. Morrison is forever writing himself into his stories, and he takes off with it, writing himself as Mod Spy Gideon Stargrave. Insanity ensues...
The final issues show the Invisibles at work, fighting Ultradimensional monsters with Voodoo and Buddha. Morrison, while writing this, was struck with numerous sicknesses, cumulating in an infected lung and a serious life crisis. This shows in the story, as everyone is subjected to airborne nanotech cancer agents and King Mob suffers from a collapsed lung.
This is great storytelling, but requires that you read the first two volumes to even come close to understanding it.
A real treat.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Near atrophied story 28 Mar 2014
By Sam Quixote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
King Mob and Lord Fanny have been kidnapped by Sir Miles and The Conspiracy and are being tortured for information on The Invisibles - will Ragged Robin, Boy and Jim Crow save them in time? Meanwhile, Jack Frost is still coming to terms with his role as saviour of humanity as the next incarnation of the Buddha, and a new member of The Invisibles is introduced who is looking for the Moonchild.

I really love Grant Morrison's writing, I do, but his Invisibles series just isn't clicking with me in the way his Batman, We3, All-Star Superman and Seaguy comics, to name just a few, do. So Entropy in the UK is the third book in the series and nearly the halfway point in the series as a whole (there are seven volumes), but I'm still having a hard time trying to give a damn about any of the characters. King Mob is tied up in a sterile lab and is being psychically interrogated by Sir Miles - and I don't care. Am I supposed to be rooting for King Mob? I suppose so, because he and the rest of the Invisibles are fighting the baddies right? But that's the only reason to care and, to be honest, it's a really flimsy one. You're basically telling the reader to like the hero because he's the hero, rather than giving the reader reasons why they should like the hero - to use the oft-repeated writing maxim, show don't tell, and there's a lot of telling in The Invisibles.

To be fair to Morrison he does continue to slowly build up other characters. In the last book it was Lord Fanny, in this book it's Boy whose backstory is revealed (and is much less convoluted than Fanny's was), but Boy is really a minor player in the book who doesn't get nearly as many pages as King Mob when we as readers should be learning more about him in order for us to actually care about what's happening to his character.

Entropy is another decent sized volume, coming in at 230 pages, but the story is very thin on the ground. King Mob is tortured, Fanny makes a voodoo doll, Dane confronts his destiny, the rest of the Invisibles putter about, and then a rescue is launched. The torture sequence in particular is very drawn out and if there's one thing I'll take away from reading The Invisibles it's how much the Wachowskis ripped off the series for their first Matrix movie. Sir Miles torturing King Mob is EXACTLY like the scene when Agent Smith is torturing Morpheus, trying to find out the location of Neo and co. Combine this and other scenes from the first book the Wachowskis used and I'm surprised Morrison didn't get a credit in the movie!

Then again, not everything Morrison's doing is exactly original. I'm not the biggest Philip K. Dick fan but I have read some of his stuff and The Invisibles feels more and more influenced by his work than ever in Entropy. The numerous spiritualism scenes and discourses on Eastern beliefs and the way King Mob claims to really be a writer called Morrison are very much aspects of Dick's writing. The author even has a cameo here! And the design for the Archon of the Outer Church is very Xenomorph-y.

However even if the story is stretched for much of the book, there are still flashes of sheer brilliance peppered unexpectedly throughout like King Mob's psychic defences against Sir Miles which are pretty impressive (his alter-ego Gideon Stargrave is a kind of campy James Bond but not as silly as Austin Powers) and artist Phil Jimenez does an incredible job with the artwork for his issues. The way Sir Miles interrogates King Mob by holding up a note stuck to a mirror saying "facial disease" and King Mob seeing himself with a facial disease was quite brilliant, and the way The Conspiracy keeps people in check from a young age using a code-word, which is the alphabet, was inspired.

Morrison's ambition and enormous vision can't be faulted. I love the mad, chaotic moments that his imagination throws out onto the page like the sentient satellite Barbelith and the way Dane is forced to absorb the collective suffering of humanity to understand why he has to stop running and face his destiny. It's just the way Morrison writes it that keeps me from connecting to the material in a meaningful way. The characters remain barely realised and the story remains an abstract idea. Maybe I'd feel more positively toward the series if I were as into chaos magic as Morrison but seeing the Invisibles and their enemies engaged in psychic combat made me laugh more than anything. I kept thinking of that scene from South Park where the "psychics" are having a battle and it's just a bunch of weird people in costumes making "pew pew" noises and waving their arms at one another with nothing at all happening (sorry if you're into chaos magic - this is just what it looks like from the outside).

I'm going to keep going with the series because I am interested to see where Morrison is taking all of this but from what I can tell about The Invisibles so far is that it's a series more interested in portraying semi-philosophical ideas and esoteric magic concepts rather than memorable characters or a meaningful story, which simply doesn't make for a riveting reading experience unless you're already interested in this kind of material.
As things get worse for the Invisibles, things only get better for us! 24 Sep 2008
By Will Carper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The third volume of The Invisibles--my personal favorite--opens with the brutal interrogation of King Mob. As his teammates rush to his rescue, Jack Frost, who deserted the team in the previous volume, goes home to Liverpool. Jack, driven over the edge by the memory of the soldier he was forced to kill in Vol. 2 and the knowledge that he is the next messiah, could care less about his friends. Yet when forced to experience the collective suffering of all humanity by the mysterious sentient satellite Barbelith (which is a whole other story......), Jack changes his mind. Finally accepting responsibility for once in his life, he decides to face his fears and help his friends.

Jack performs some feats reminiscent of both Buddha and Jesus and, in the end, saves the day. At the beginning of the series, Jack was angry, disaffected, self-centered.... basically, he was a teenager. Now--and it's this growth of character within Jack that draws me to this volume of the series in particular--he's grown up, accepted his destiny, and is willing to put himself on the line for those he cares about. Jack's evolution as a character is the focal point of The Invisibles' first three volumes--after this, he takes a back seat. But all is well. Jack is simply taking everything in while the rest of the team has their crazy adventures. You see, Jack's been enlightened, and he doesn't necessarily buy all the rhetoric that the Invisibles are selling.......

It's Morrison's willingness to push his characters to (and over) their boundaries and subvert even the subverters that makes The Invisibles a classic must-read.
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