Intuition: Its Powers and Perils and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Intuition: Its Powers and Perils on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Intuition: Its Powers and Perils [Hardcover]

David Myers
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 11.33  
Hardcover --  
Paperback 13.90  

Book Description

13 Sep 2002
How reliable is our intuition? How much should we depend on gut-level instinct rather than rational analysis when we play the stock market, choose a mate, hire an employee, or assess our own abilities? In this discussion, David Myers shows us that while intuition can provide us with useful, and often amazing, insights, it can also dangerously mislead us. Drawing on psychological research, Myers discusses the powers and perils of intuition when: judges and jurors determine who is telling the truth; mental health workers predict whether someone is at risk for suicide or crime; coaches, players and fans decide who has the hot hand or the hot bat; personnel directors hire new employees; and psychics claim to be clairvoyant or to have premonitions.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (13 Sep 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300095317
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300095319
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 14.8 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,685,444 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Intuition is hot. But often it is perilously wrong. David Myers marshals classic and contemporary cognitive science and masterfully shows us why." -- Elizabeth Loftus, past president, American Psychological Society

"This is a great book. It made me more aware of both the awesome capacities of the human mind and the caveats for analytical thinking." -- Don Clifton, chairman, Gallup International Research and Education Center, past chairman, The Gallup Organization, and coauthor of Now Discover Your Strengths.

About the Author

David G. Myers, John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College, is also the author of The American Paradox: Spiritual Hunger in an Age of Plenty and A Quiet World: Living with Hearing Loss, both published by Yale University Press. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
As a research psychologist and communicator of psychological science, I have spent a career pondering the connections between subjective and objective truth, between feeling and fact, between intuition and reality. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Intuition is a hot topic. Today there are lots of trainers, coaches, consultants, and authors advocating the powers of intuition. 'Don't be too rational, trust you intuition!', they say. But how well-informed are these people about what intuition really is? To what extent can you rely on your intuition and to what extent should you be skeptical? In this book, David Myers, a well-known writer on psychology, explains what is known about intuition.
WE KNOW MORE THAN WE KNOW WE KNOW
What is it anyway? David Myers explains that intuition is our capacity for direct knowledge, for immediate insight without observation or reason. In contrast, deliberte thinking is reasoning-like, critical, and anlytic. So there are two levels of thinking:
1. DELIBERATE THINKING: this level of thinking is conscious and analytical. It is very valuable because it helps us to focus on what is really important and protects us from having to think about everything at once. It is as it where the mind's executive desk.
2. INTUITION: this unconscious level is automatic. It seems, inside our minds there are processing systems that work without us knowing it. To use a metafor by David Myers: we effortlessly delegate most of our thinking and decisions making to the masses of cognitive workers busily at work in our minds's basement. These processes enables us, for instance, to recognize instantly, among thousands of humans, someone we have not seen in five years. We do know, but we don't know how we know.
WHAT WE KNOW, BUT DON'T KNOW WE KNOW, AFFECTS MORE THAN WE KNOW
Both ways of knowing are present within each person. Often they support eachother, sometimes they lead to conflicting conclusions. One thing is important: we tend to underrate how much of our actions are guided by unconsicous thinking.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Read 25 Feb 2006
By Richard Stowey VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed this title from start to end.
The concept of intuition is well defined throughout the book and David Myers investivates the powers, perils and various applications for intuition within our everyday lives.
The book extends to around 307 pages, but only the first 249 are really readable. The book does a great job of citing other sources and accurately recording other work and data. The remaining pages at the end of the book keep notes of all the sources. This is a great resource, and nice place to start for information on a variety of topics surrounding intuition.
Meyers uses a great writing style which is simple and easy to follow. The book is extremely easy to pick up and read for short or long periods of time. The content is well presented and Meyers makes some great points. I appreciated this book i think a little more because of a little previous reading on the subject of psychology. Many similar subject and topic matters came up and it helps to be able to correlate between them.
Much of the book is about intuition in reality and Meyers takes a big step in explaining away a lot of lifes little intuitive feelings, and putting the scientific explaination in place. But near the end of the book he brings back some of the spiritual connections. There are parts of the book which come accross as statistical nightmares, and one section relies heavily on americanised sports which can be a little tough to understand if you don't know much about baseball or basketball jargon.
A great read, and a great all-round book on the subject. Something best read with a tiny little psychology knowledge but also near the 'beginners guide' end of the scale.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we know but dont know we know affects more than we know 30 Oct 2002
By Coert Visser - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Intuition is a hot topic. Today there are lots of trainers, coaches, consultants, and authors advocating the powers of intuition. 'Don't be too rational, trust you intuition!', they say. But how well-informed are these people about what intuition really is? To what extent can you rely on your intuition and to what extent should you be skeptical? In this book, David Myers, a well-known writer on psychology, explains what is known about intuition.
WE KNOW MORE THAN WE KNOW WE KNOW
What is it anyway? David Myers explains that intuition is our capacity for direct knowledge, for immediate insight without observation or reason. In contrast, deliberte thinking is reasoning-like, critical, and anlytic. So there are two levels of thinking:
1. DELIBERATE THINKING: this level of thinking is conscious and analytical. It is very valuable because it helps us to focus on what is really important and protects us from having to think about everything at once. It is as it where the mind's executive desk.
2. INTUITION: this unconscious level is automatic. It seems, inside our minds there are processing systems that work without us knowing it. To use a metafor by David Myers: we effortlessly delegate most of our thinking and decisions making to the masses of cognitive workers busily at work in our minds's basement. These processes enables us, for instance, to recognize instantly, among thousands of humans, someone we have not seen in five years. We do know, but we don't know how we know.
WHAT WE KNOW, BUT DON'T KNOW WE KNOW, AFFECTS MORE THAN WE KNOW
Both ways of knowing are present within each person. Often they support eachother, sometimes they lead to conflicting conclusions. One thing is important: we tend to underrate how much of our actions are guided by unconsicous thinking. A vast proportion of our behavior is under control of unconscious perception and information processing. This 'automaticity of being' helps us through most of the situations we encounter (you type without consciously knowing where exactly the letters on your keyboard are; you'd have to 'ask your fingers` to know where they are). What's more, it is even so that we can process and be influenced by unattended information (for instance you had not noticed someone talking at a party until s/he mentioned your name, then you suddenly noticed this). Furthermore, we sometimes unconsciously continue processing information regarding problems (after having stopped trying to remember a name, we sometimes 'suddenly` remember it).
WE DON'T SEE THINGS AS THEY ARE, WE SEE THINGS AS WE ARE
Intuition is powerful and important and often it will pay to 'listen to your heart`. But intuition also often errs. An important example is that our theories and assumptions distort our perceptions and interpretations. For instance if we hold a stereotype about a certain category of people, we unknowingly tend to selectively perceive what they do. We tend to notice information that confirms the stereotype more readily than other information. This way, we tend to see our beliefs confirmed. Other examples of unrealistic intuition are: 1) hindsight bias ('I knew it all along'), 2) self-serving bias (accepting more responsibility for succeses that for failures), 3) overconfidence bias (we tend to intuitively assume that the way we perceive the world, so it is).
CONCLUSION
This is a great book for anyone interested in psychology and intuition. The material is presented very pleasantly and clearly. David Myers describes many interesting experiments that certainly will challenge your intuition (for instance some eye-opening experiments by the recent Nobel price winner psychologist Daniel Kahneman). Often these experiments will surprise you. Special attention is payed to the role of intuition in specific contexts like sports, investment, therapy, interviewing and risk taking. Psychology is still an interesting subject. This book is a clear reminder of that. ...
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Long on data, short on theory 25 Nov 2002
By James Daniels - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
In Intuition: Its Powers and Perils, author David Myers provides an overview of the unconscious operations of the human mind.
He begins by arguing that we have two parallel systems operating in our day to day lives, the conscious/rational system and the unconscious/intuitive system. The former is slow and deliberate, the latter is fast and sometimes inaccurate. He then details may of the ways in which our intuition proves incorrect in areas like geography, personal memories, individual competence, and foly physics. Myers ends the book with a long chapter about our intuition in medicine, job interviews, risk, and gambling.
Throughout the book, Myers repeats a theme popular since Tversky and Khanneman's papers in the 1970s: the human mind has predictable biases and innaccuracies on a host of logical puzzles and laboratory tests. As such, the book is basically a 249 page review article of the evidence against human rationality. While many of his examples are fascinating, there is no overall theory or mechanism given to account for this irrationality.
To take one example he uses, imagine a ball dropped from a plane. Most people intuitively feel that the ball should fall straight down, rather than along the correct parabolic path to the earth. Myers takes this as evidence of a faulted folk-physics. Unfortunately, despite this fault, people have no problem catching balls falling from great heights. Is it possible that our intuition is in fact robust and accurate within the domains where it is used, and only incorrect in the unusual situations of the laboratory? Myers only casually addresses this, but his evidence on competence developing at certain tasks and jobs indicates that this might be the case.
I would recommend this book to anyone trying to access the primary literature on human rationality and its shortcomings. It is a nice overview. Those attempting to understand how intuition is used by humans in everyday situations, that is, a theory of intuition, will have to keep looking. I recommend Gerd Gigerenzer's book, Adaptive Thinking, as an excellent starting point.
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent overview of intuition, decision making and risk 9 Dec 2002
By Kevin Hogan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Myers brings together a lot of research into a very readable book about "knowing."
Myers explains to some degree how we know...and why we are likely to be correct. This is well documented although perhaps not as thorough as Sources of Power or Strangers Unto Ourselves by Wilson. Nevertheless there is plenty of meat here.
Then he talks in much greater detail about how and when our intuition is likely to fail us. This is much more enjoyable reading and thorough in scope.
Myers gives a significant amount of attention to ESP, psychic intuition and gambling, all of which are evenly presented and well thought out.
If you have an interest in decision making, intuition, risk, and how we "think" this is a brilliant introduction.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction 9 Aug 2006
By Dr. Lee D. Carlson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
As a tool for prediction, scientific discovery, business management, and many other areas, intuition has been claimed by many to be essential, even superior to other more quantitative approaches to cognition. In fact, there is at the present time a fairly intense debate going on between two camps: one camp consisting of those who believe intuition to be the superior mode of cognition, and the other camp consisting of those who favor cognitive efforts that are governed by mathematical/computational algorithms. The tension between these groups probably would not have arisen if it were not for the intense interest in building thinking machines. Indeed, developments in artificial intelligence over the past few decades have shown beyond doubt that many tasks that were once thought to need "intuition" for their completion, origination, or evaluation, can now be accomplished by machines using artificial reasoning patterns.

But far from being a well-defined mode of cognition, intuition has been a kind of catchphrase that is used to explain the ability to solve problems and reach goals without really knowing how. The apologists of intuition emphasize its ability to deal with issues and problems of a qualitative nature (the famous Einstein dictum that "not everything that counts can be counted"). In some extreme instances, enthusiasts of intuition think of it as a "power", the possession of which will give one distinct advantages, especially in the areas of business and finance. Indeed, there are the "intuitive" financial traders who boast of their abilities to foresee market trends that the "quants" cannot, and they do so without really quantifying just how much advantage their intuition has over more mathematical/algorithmic approaches to financial trading. Human intelligence in their view goes beyond mere logic, and can capture or "intuit" things that computational algorithms cannot. Business managers who make decisions based on their "gut feelings" are another example of the belief in the power of intuition. This reviewer knows of many instances where millions of dollars in revenue or capital expenditures have rested on the "gut feelings" of a senior manager, with disastrous consequences.

In this highly interesting work, the author discusses the pros and cons of intuition, and in doing so has given the reader an account of the subject that demystifies it and makes its contemplation and possible justification more palatable from a scientific point of view. That is not to say that the book is a scientific study for it is not, but it could be viewed as a precursor to such a study, which if done carefully would be extremely important and interesting. If there are elements of human (or for that matter nonhuman) intelligence that do not rely on logical or mathematical computations or processes, then the identification of these elements would assist those who are attempting to build non-biological thinking machines. A rigorous scientific study would isolate those patterns of thought and human actions that cannot be represented as a mathematical or algorithmic process and through laboratory investigations would justify how advantageous "intuition" is over more quantitative modes of thought. The field of cognitive neuroscience will no doubt shed even more light on the role of intuition as it advances in the decades ahead. If a book like this is written twenty years from now it might be considerably smaller in size, with only a few pages needed to discuss the role of intuition in problem solving since many more tasks will have been shown to be doable by machines. The trend seems to be in this direction.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good introductory book 18 Dec 2004
By R. Riddle - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Intuition has many forms with many results, both good and bad for decision makers who rely on their intuitions. This book, as promised in the title -- Intuition: its power and peril -- lays out a very readable survey of the scientific psychological research on intuition. This is more like an undergraduate survey course than an in-depth discussion of what intuition is and how it can be improved and used more profitably to produce better results in our decision making. On the whole, however, an interesting book worth reading.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback