An Introduction To Quantum Field Theory and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£45.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
An Introduction to Quantu... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £6.64
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory (Frontiers in Physics) Hardcover – 11 Sep 1995

12 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£45.99
£34.58 £26.57
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.75
£45.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory (Frontiers in Physics) + Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell + Quantum Field Theory
Price For All Three: £129.33

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £6.64
Trade in An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory (Frontiers in Physics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £6.64, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 864 pages
  • Publisher: Westview Press Inc (11 Sept. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201503972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201503975
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 282,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Michael E. Peskin received his doctorate in physics from Cornell University and has held research appointments in theoretical physics at Harvard, Cornell, and CEN Saclay. In 1982, he joined the staff of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where he is now Professor of Physics. Daniel V. Schroeder received his doctorate in physics from Stanford University in 1990. He held visiting appointments at Pomona College before joining the faculty of Weber State University, where he is now Associate Professor of Physics. Michael E. Peskin received his doctorate in physics from Cornell University and has held research appointments in theoretical physics at Harvard, Cornell, and CEN Saclay. In 1982, he joined the staff of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where he is now Professor of Physics. Daniel V. Schroeder received his doctorate in physics from Stanford University in 1990. He held visiting appointments at Pomona College before joining the faculty of Weber State University, where he is now Associate Professor of Physics.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Carlo N. Colacino on 21 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory is an excellent book, I have read it once and I keep going back to it when I need something, and that happens very often. And I have never been disappointed so far: the book has got everything I need. However, the title is very deceptive: it is not a Quantum Field Theory primer, it is a book that one can read (and enjoy!) only after reading easier books, in this respect I find Michele Maggiore's "A Modern Introduction to Quantum Field Theory" (OUP 2004) and the classical "Field Theory: a Modern Primer" by Pierre Ramond (Perseus, 2nd edition 1999) more suitable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. Mcgarrie on 17 April 2007
Format: Hardcover
If your taking your first course in quantum field theory and feeling excited like you want to buy a book about it...don't buy this one. There are plenty of good clear books and internet resources out there that will give much more clarity about Dirac field, K.G. field, quantisation, perturbation either by canonical form or path integrals right up to renormalisation and regularisation. For example, the path integral approach in A.ZEE Intro to quantum field theory is a good place to get conceptual understanding.

After you have been studying the subject for a while and actually want a deeper mathematical and technical understand then this book is a keeper!! It is substantial and technical book, more for the researcher than the MSci or undergrad student. Also, this book looks good on the shelf; hardcover and thick. It is the kind of book that once you understand the subject you want a good book to refer to, but it isn't the kind of book to learn from.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 Mar. 1998
Format: Hardcover
I worked through the most of this book in explicit detail (the only way to get the full benefit, in my humble opinion), and, while it was very good at teaching the methods for deriving and computing Feynman diagrams, it often sacrifices pedagogy for explicit calculation. For instance, while there is a brief discussion of representations of the Lorentz group, the book gives no indication of how to construct and work with fields of higher spin. Also, I found their discussion of the LSZ reduction formulae rather impenetrable. (Their discussion of BRST symmetry, in contrast, is very readable and easily understood.) So, while I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn to do calculations in quantum field theory, it is imperative that they supplement this book with other sources that treat important topics, like the CPT theorem, general representation theory, and non-perturbative phenomena (which are barely mentioned here), in detail. (Also, there are a rather large number of unfortunate typos in the first edition...)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mark Arjomandi on 18 Mar. 2006
Format: Hardcover
Quantum Field Theory is a theory of modern physics which combines together quantum mechanics and special relativity and thus can be thought of as quantum mechanics in four space-time dimensions. Since its advent in the 1920's by the pioneering works of Dirac et al. the theory has grown to be a huge area encompassing both electrodynamics (QED) and the standard model of particle physics (QCD). The text by Schroeder and Peskin (first published in the U.S. by Westview Press, 1995) is a lucid, modern introduction and reference to this important subject which is nowadays highly indispensible for any serious student or researcher of modern physics.
The book is divided into three parts: In the first part, the authors introduce the Feynman diagrams as a prelude to QED and continue on by an elaboration of the Klein-Gordon equation, the Dirac field, perturbation theory and radiative corrections. In the second part which mainly deals with renormalization, discussion starts out with a survey of the functional methods, followed by the counting of ultraviolet divergences, the role of symmetry and the concept of effective action, the renormalization group (Wilson's approach and CS equation), and finally there is a foray into the condensed matter physics via the topic of critical exponents and nonlinear sigma models. In the third and final part, the focus shifts to the non-abelian gauge theories, their invariance, quantization, QCD, operator products, anomalies and spontaneous symmetry breaking (Higgs mechanism, G-W-S electroweak theory) culminating in a chapter on QFT at the frontier, outlining a brief on grand unified theories and supersymmetry, also pointing out some references for further study.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Dec. 1998
Format: Hardcover
A balanced, comprehensive and pedagogical text on quantum field theory. I highly recommend it, especially to beginners, who may prefer it to Brown (highly technical and sometimes obscure if one doesn't know the subject already) and Weinberg (encyclopedic and masterful but very dense). It is divided into three parts. Part I deals with foundations and explores QED in a self-contained manner, and is very helpful in connecting the reader familiar with quantum mechanics to field theoretic ideas, including calculating with Feynman diagrams. Part II is an introduction to modern techniques, including the path integral formalism, renormalization group and connection to statistical mechanics. Part III discusses the Standard Model of particle physics, including QCD and asymptotic freedom, the Weinberg-Salam electroweak theory, and anomalies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback