Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

An Introduction to the Gothic Language Hardcover – May 1981


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£80.59 £29.99
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"An introductory textbook of Gothic by a scholar of Professor Bennett's eminence is of course to be welcomed without qualification, the more so because it in no way duplicates its competitors in the field. The clarity of presentation is exemplary." --Modern Language Review --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8b45fcf0) out of 5 stars 8 reviews
46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8b467180) out of 5 stars Bennett, on the Gothic Language 3 April 2000
By Mr. Gary Dykes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This 190 page hardcover edition is a fine supplement to the classical works by Wright and Streitberg. Professor Bennett (born in 1907, and long associated with Notre Dame)is eminently qualified for such a work.
The work nicely intergrates Gothic within its Indo-European framework, displaying and commenting upon the relationships.
As an expert within the disapline of general Indo-European linguistics, the reader will note a healty dosage of modern linguistic terms and concepts.
The book is laid out into 28 chapters, each covering some aspect of the language (grammar, phonetics, historical aspects etc.)and each has some concluding exercises. [No answers are provided in a supplementary work (apparently), the user seeks out the answer in the work]. It is thus a book useful for classroom purposes. It has a fine 42 page Gothic-English dictionary, and a good bibliography. It also has a proper (though brief) index.
The various languages used in the text are clearly transliterated, and the type and layout is clutter-free. One objection I have is that he does not show his precise transliteration scheme for the IE (or PIE) words or for the Greek words, it appears that he is assuming that the instructor and student are familiar with his (or a standard?) scheme. As an expert with the Germanic languages he displays his adeptness here, perhaps too much so, as he seems to focus a bit heavily upon the Germanic/Latin angle as opposed to the German/IE/Greek aspects. But this may be just my bias.
The hardcover edition has 3 facsimiles of Gothic MSS, one of which is very unreadable (none on glossy paper). Bennett gives some room for discussion about the surviving texts. The hardbound edition is well made, it is smyth-sewn, no statements are made regarding the quality of the paper, but it feels acid-free.
All-in-all, a fine work, highly recommended for all students of this fine ancient language, and important for Biblical scholars as well who desire (or need) to access an early text of the NT. This grammar can get you up and running. A good book well worth $32.00.
39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8b4618f0) out of 5 stars The easiest introduction I have seen. 16 July 2001
By Juan Pablo Pira - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
While most Gothic language introductions and grammars assume a very thorough knowledge of Germanic comparative linguistics, this one actually defines most of the technical terms it uses. Has a good explanation of the rules and even some exercises (no answers, though). Seems adequate for classroom or self- study. Texts in Gothic are used from the very beginning (some original, some from ancient sources). Above all, the way the rules are presented and the choice of readings make this book a FUN learning experience.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8b589f84) out of 5 stars Bennett, on the Gothic Language 3 April 2000
By Mr. Gary Dykes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This 190 page hardcover edition is a fine supplement to the classical works by Wright and Streitberg. Professor Bennett (born in 1907, and long associated with Notre Dame) is eminently qualified for such a work.
The work nicely intergrates Gothic within its Indo-European framework, displaying and commenting upon the relationships.
As an expert (i.e. Bennett) within the disapline of general Indo-European linguistics, the reader will note a healty dosage of modern linguistic terms and concepts.
The book is laid out into 28 chapters, each covering some aspect of the language (grammar, phonetics, historical aspects etc.) and each has some concluding exercises. [No answers are provided in a supplementary work (apparently), the user seeks out the answer in the work]. It is thus a book useful for classroom purposes. It has a fine 42 page Gothic-English dictionary, and a good bibliography. It also has a proper (though brief) index.
The various languages used in the text are clearly transliterated, and the type and layout is clutter-free. One objection I have is that he does not show his precise transliteration scheme for the IE (or PIE) words or for the Greek words, it appears that he is assuming that the instructor and student are familiar with his (or a standard?) scheme. As an expert with the Germanic languages he displays his adeptness here, perhaps too much so, as he seems to focus a bit heavily upon the Germanic/Latin angle as opposed to the German/IE/Greek aspects. But this may be just my bias.
The hardcover edition has 3 facsimiles of Gothic MSS, one of which is very unreadable (none on glossy paper). Bennett gives some room for discussion about the surviving texts. The hardbound edition is well made, it is smyth-sewn, no statements are made regarding the quality of the paper, but it feels acid-free.
All-in-all, a fine work, highly recommended for all students of this fine ancient language, and important for Biblical scholars as well who desire (or need) to access an early text of the NT. This grammar can get you up and running.
20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8c9a1a14) out of 5 stars One of the most exciting languages I've picked up 18 Mar. 2002
By A. Holt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a highly praise worthy book. A good knowledge of Old English is helpful when tackling Gothic but not completely necessary. The book provides a good understanding of the history of the language as well as its place in the larger sphere of Indo-European linguistics.
Gothic is unique as the earliest attested Germanic language and the only attested East Germanic language.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8b7dc384) out of 5 stars Gets you reading Gothic right away 7 Sept. 2005
By Eric J. Kingsepp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An excellent and quite painless way to learn Gothic. Its biggest virtue lies in its organization. It's not a textbook, but it's definitely not a dry, dusty grammar like Joseph Wright's books (which, btw, are very useful books; they're just not the cover-to-cover type). The best thing about the book's layout is: it gets you reading Gothic right away! From the beginning, each chapter has:

1. a reading in Gothic (from Scripture generally, since practically all extant texts are of Wulfila's translation of the Bible);

2. all the vocab you need to understand it;

3. a manageable-sized description of some piece of grammar (say, a couple of classes of nouns here, a few more the next chapter) with exercises to help you drill yourself on them; and

4. some other information.

These last sections range from an easy-to-read discussion about Indo-European to the place of Gothic within the Germanic language family, to a brief history of the Gothic tribes, to (later) discussions about phonetics and morphology that are more technical, not b/c of their writing style but simply b/c they're packed with information. These stem from the book's expressed purpose of presenting Gothic not only as easily as possible for the learner, but in the context of comparative Germanics and comparative linguistics generally.

If you're not into comparative linguistics, you can ignore these parts and still learn the language with relative speed. It's a very versatile book. A decent amount of effort on each chapter of this book will amaze you with how soon you can read Gothic texts. Highly recommended.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback