See Wishlist
Into The Labyrinth
 
See larger image
 

Into The Labyrinth

9 Jan 2009 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
6:35
2
5:30
3
3:53
4
0:42
5
5:04
6
4:08
7
4:05
8
0:40
9
4:35
10
3:56
11
3:56
12
3:54
13
3:12

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 9 Jan 2009
  • Label: Steamhammer
  • Copyright: 2009 Steamhammer
  • Total Length: 50:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003JF1V5G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,146 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Conrad1965 on 19 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
The CD has some classic Saxon moments. Battalions of Steel is a great opener (even if I did think Id bought a Within Temptation CD when the choir kicked in!) and Slow Lane Blues could almost be a sequel to Strong Arm Of The Law. Live to Rock & Valley Of The Kings are other great tracks but there are a few dodgy moments especially Hellcat. Its listed as a 14 track CD but 2 tracks are 40 seconds long and are really introductions to the songs that follow. Its still a strong Saxon album and fans would not be disappointed.

The booklet with the CD shows each member of the band seemingly realising their acting ambitions. Biff is Indiana Jones, Nigel Glockler is Biggles, Paul Quinn is a hitchhiker (Hasn't quite got the hand signal right) , Nibbs Carter seems to be stewing over his shopping list and only Doug Scarrett knows who Doug Scarrett is supposed to be!!

For the DVD content I can hear the sound of a barrel being scraped. "Perceval starring Biff Byford" is a 20 minute Italian mini movie with English subtitles. Biff is unrecognisable looking more like Merlin than King Arthur and is on screen for about 2 minutes total. Its funny to hear Italian spoken with a Yorkshire accent but everyone looks and sounds incredibly bored. Its all very sombre so having Saxons Never Surrender over the end credits seems totally out of place

The next item is a 36 minute German documentary about a lighting Engineer and its as exciting as it sounds. There are a couple of token short clips of the band live and its interesting to see how big a show they put on in Germany. Someone has also been playing games with the subtitles ("When are you gonad to be finished with that"). Its directed by someone called Christian Rapp who seems to want to be known as "Crap.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By GoldenWonder on 19 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Like Motorhead? Like Maiden? You'll like this. Uncomplicated but solid metal that is easy to get into and enjoy time and time again.

Put it on in the car and forget the miserable weather and the traffic jams and enjoy some Saxon!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sangeet Rcknrol on 25 Jun 2011
Format: Audio CD
I like Saxon since when I was lent 'Destiny' cassette by a friend to listen to. I liked the album so much that later I bought the CD for my best CD collections. It's one of my favourite albums of all time. They already did many albums. I bought another two - 'Rock The Nations' and 'A Collection Of Metal'. Typical British metal. Then in 2009, I got 'Into The Labyrinth' upon its release. At first I did not like it. Maybe music is mood. The latest 2011's 'Call To Arms', hit me heavy and I went back to looking in the shelf for Labyrinth. And I tell you these two are the albums that prove Saxon still rocks. Heavy riffs, good voice, good lyrics. Typical Saxon. Rock 'N' Roll \,,/,
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Samphire on 31 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is the best Saxon album since Rock the Nations. A real return to form from one of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal's original gods.

The album also sees Saxon spreading their wings. 'Battalions of Steel' could be a cross between Hammerfall and Nightwish, while 'Coming Home' sees Biff and co. discovering their blues roots for a Southern-tinged ballad.

My only complaint is that there are a few too many fillers. I removed 'Live to Rock', 'Crime of Passion', 'Protect Yourselves' and 'Hellcat' from my playlist and am now left with an almost perfect metal album.

No metalhead should be without this one.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. B. Kennedy on 28 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
Hark; I hear the sound of distant Gregorian chants, the tolling of a bell, a call to ride valiantly into battle - swords held high...Rejoice...it must be a new Saxon album! And indeed it is. Yes, Saxon are back once more, with another incredibly strong album to add to their list of recent releases. It's not as full on heavy metal as Lionheart was, and it's not as Euro-power metal as Inner Sanctum, it's kind of somewhere in between. The tracks flit to an extent between the two camps. Where you'll have a full on track like Sweeney Todd, it'll be followed by the more anthemic Valley of the Kings. Crime of Passion is packed with thrashy riffs, and then comes the power metal of Voice. To my mind, the mix works really well. Then there's a track like Slow Lane Blues which must be a new classic in the making. Or the closing Coming Home which is miles better than I ever hoped to imagine. I'm not a fan of bands re-recording their own material, and Coming Home was only released in it's own right a few years ago. But the guitars on this track are amazing. In fact, the level of musicianship throughout this album is absolutely top drawer.

Will this album pull in any new fans? Maybe not. But if you've been a fan in the past, and let Saxon pass you by for the last decade or so, then this is a brilliant introduction to the sort of thing you've been missing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr. H TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
It's now over thirty years since Saxon launched themselves on the heavy metal scene, although they'd already been around for a few years under the name Son Of A Bitch. Despite their vintage, they were adopted wholesale by the burgeoning New Wave of British Heavy Metal scene, having some incredible success in the very early eighties with hit albums like Wheels Of Steel and Strong Arm Of The Law and hit singles such as "And The Bands Played On". They rushed out a series of albums including the legendary live release The Eagle Has Landed, but it all went sour on their home turf, when they broadened their sound in attempt to crack America, and things rapidly went downhill after 1983's Power & The Glory release.

They tried an increasingly commercial approach which hit a nadir with their cover of the Christopher Cross tune "Ride Like The Wind", and a series off lineup changes ended up with two versions of Saxon doing the rounds before the version led by vocalist Peter "Biff" Byford won the legal battle. However, they always maintained a strong presence in the metal heartland of Germany, and remained beloved by many for inspiring the writers of "This Is Spinal Tap". Christopher Guest and Harry Shearer have confirmed that Saxon was a major inspiration for the 1984 mockumentary and they copied many of Saxon's mannerisms on stage. This came about after Harry Shearer toured with the band in 1981, hearing anecdotes from lead guitarist Graham Oliver and bassist Steve "Dobby" Dawson. Shearer also copied many of Dawson's mannerisms, such as playing his bass with one hand plucking the strings while the other one points to the crowd and he even sported a moustache just like Dawson's.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category