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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone Paperback – 1 May 2004


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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures Of Stanley And Livingstone + Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa's Greatest Explorer + The Scramble For Africa
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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; New Ed edition (1 May 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553814478
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553814477
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 109,078 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"'Fresh and vivid...Dugard retells this great story very effectively'" (Sunday Express)

"'Measured and assured. His researches have unearthed considerable material and he has assembled it with care...genuinely gripping, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in the history of exploration'" (Sunday Telegraph)

"'Its great strength lies in taking a story you thought you knew well and telling you so many things of which you had no idea'" (Daily Mail)

"'It is one of the most exciting stories in the annals exploration, has one of the most extraordinary denouements, and gave rise to the wonderfully inept line, "Dr Livingstone, I presume?" Henry Morton Stanley's 1871 mission to rescue the good doctor in deepest Africa has been told dozens of times before...yet the story is good enough to withstand retelling and Martin Dugard obliges with gusto...Dugard's focus is not the search for the source of the Nile, but the characters and events that led to the famous meeting...he weaves a tight and gripping narrative...and his portrait of 19th-century Africa is vivid and convincing - you can feel the mixture of heart-stirring beauty and soul-stirring horror'" (The Sunday Times)

"'One cracking adventure story...will keep you turning the pages well into the night, I promise you'" (Bill Bryson)

Book Description

The gripping and acclaimed retelling of the legendary story of Livingstone and Stanley.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A D Cutmore on 12 Oct. 2004
Format: Paperback
A fascinating insight into early exploration within Africa. Martin's portrayal of Stanley through immense research is both captivating and enthralling. Wriiten at a pace which allows you to understand the indivduals involved and the problems they encountered whilst never diminshing in excitement. My highest accolade is that books on these subjects have tendancy to throw fact after fact at you which make the book hard work. Ths is in essence a story of Stanley's life and personally I found it far easier to assimilate facts that were enjoyable to read. Many thanks to Martin for writing such a fantastic book about a truly epic journey.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By CFB London on 17 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Into Africa tells the story of the events leading up to the famous meeting of Stanley and Livingstone in Africa in 1871. The book is well-written and conveys a good sense into what life was like on the African expeditions undertaken by explorers during the Victorian era. More importantly, the story is told in the context of the major events and developments that were happening in the world at or around that time. While I would not characterise this as "unputdownable", it moves along well and is written in a clear and reader-friendly style. On the negative side, the recounting of the day-to-day tribulations involved in an African expedition became a bit tedious after a while, and in my view the story (at no fault of the author) lacked real suspense until the days immediately leading up to the Stanley-Livingstone meeting. Another not insignificant shortcoming is the lack of any good maps in the book. The story is filled with references to villages, rivers, lakes, valleys, etc. yet there is only one map in the book (Livingstone's own map drawn at the time) which is not clear nor comprehensive. Overall, a well-written narrative history that is entertaining and worth reading.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. Butler on 19 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a story I have heard about all my life, and didn't think there was anything new to say about it. My mistake! The very clever author of this book has made the story fresh and current. He has done this by relating the lives of Livingston and Stanley from birth, and leading up to their famious first meeting.

The author also gives a very good impression of British society in the mid 19th century. For example, I was astonished at what a big event Livingston's funeral was. Putting it in a modern context, it was on a par with the funeral of Princess Diana. I have tried to read similar books in the past, but they have been too dry. However, 'Into Africa' was written in a very engaging way, and I would recommend it to anyone.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Loveitt on 21 May 2003
Format: Hardcover
Here's what I knew (or thought I knew) before I read this book: David Livingstone was a missionary who, after many years of trying, converted almost no Africans to Christianity. He got sidetracked into trying his luck at exploration...and didn't have much luck. He mainly wandered around, not accomplishing much. Henry Morton Stanley went looking for Livingstone as a newspaper "publicity stunt." He had a lot of money behind him and found Livingstone without too much trouble. Later on in life he went back to Africa and debased himself by working for the notorious King Leopold of Belgium, helping to set up the infamous slave-labor colony in the Congo. He was, even before he went to the Congo, a cruel racist. Although maybe I shouldn't admit to my ignorance, that's pretty much what I "knew." Some of the above turned out to be true, some of it didn't, as I discovered after reading this book. It is true Livingstone didn't have much luck with conversions, even though he spent a good portion of the last 30 years of his life in Africa. He was, however, a better explorer than I realized. He was the first white man to walk across Africa, doing so from east to west. From 1841-1851 he explored the deserts, rivers and lakes of Southern Africa. From 1858-1863 he explored the Zambezi river and the area to the north of the river. It is true that he didn't accomplish two of the main goals he had set for himself. He hoped, by his explorations, to open up the African interior to economic development which would eliminate the slave trade. This didn't happen during his lifetime.Read more ›
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By Cake on 16 July 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was our Book Club Choice for June 2011. I was daunted by it I must admit and rightly so. I found it quite dull and very very steady throughout. BUT...
having finished it I feel like I do when I come away from a grueling gym session - like I couldn't be bothered to do it but with a little bit of effort and perseverance I am glad I did it.
I decided to make this read even harder for myself by also reading alongside it the Tim Butcher Blood River. I then to fill in the years in between the 2 went on line and looked at King Leopold 2nd of Belgium so had at the end of it a great knowledge of the Congo. Putting it all together I feel very proud of myself for doing this. Into Africa was as epic a read as it was an adventure for all those involved.
If you fancy having a go at it I really do recommend going the whole hog and reading all I have read on the subject as I have left the Congo and Livingstone and Stanley with a feeling of great respect for these early explorers and a pang of guilt and complete amazement at the way the Congolese were treated by us so called "civilized" people. Shame on the British Empire and Europe during this hideous period in history.
I made it to the end, so can you!
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