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Interstellar Space
 
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Interstellar Space

12 Jun 2000 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
10:43
30
2
8:36
30
3
5:25
30
4
11:43
30
5
10:56
30
6
6:43

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 4 Jun 2007
  • Release Date: 4 Jun 2007
  • Label: IMS
  • Copyright: (C) 2000 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 54:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KRVXH6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 89,195 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By kit7635 on 24 Dec 2004
Format: Audio CD
Ferocious and luminously beautiful free improvised duets from 1967 with Rashied Ali, swinging like crazy and actually rather acessable. Unforced and wide open, the absence of any third parties to clog the gears gives the music total freedom to breathe and swell, saxophonist Coltrane an effortless stream of soul resonanting shapes and transitions and Ali a blizzard of crashing drums. An amazing recording, with the instrument tones seamlessly stinging and billowy and the recording studio reverberating like a church.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By pjr VINE VOICE on 28 Feb 2008
Format: Audio CD
By the time of the recordings of these pieces in 1967 John Coltrane was travelling farther and father out into the musical hinterland of free jazz. This set of recordings with drummer Rashid Ali is about as far as you can get. The music here is wild and powerful and at times violent as Ali and Coltrane at times seem to battle for the space in the music.

This is improvisation of the first order. Coltrane's playing squawks, honks, runs, and stutters its way around the clattering cachophony of Ali's frenetic drumming. Easy listening it isn't. It does seem to be a statement and it is fascinating to wonder where Coltrane would have gone next with his music beacuase listening to this you sometimes conclude that this was something of a final statement. If John Coltrane really was on some kind of musical journey it does seem, listening to this, that perhaps he had arrived.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Paul Bowes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 Mar 2011
Format: Audio CD
Recorded in 1967 but not released until 1974, these duets between John Coltrane and drummer Rashied Ali may actually be the most accessible recordings that the 'free' Coltrane ever made. The longest piece runs less than twelve minutes, so there are no half-hour endurance tests. The absence of other melody or harmony instruments means that the listener can hear Coltrane's extraordinary virtuosity and sense his passionate involvement without distraction. The much-maligned Rashied Ali provides a continuous foundation and commentary that is fascinating in its own right and as valid in its way as the more metrical playing of Elvin Jones.

A cursory listen might suggest that the six pieces here are essentially variations on a theme, but in fact they all have their own characters. I came to this album something of a skeptic about late Coltrane, and have found myself listening to this repeatedly. Recommended for anybody who is prepared to listen with an open mind.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Palmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Jan 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is undoubtedly very much music of its time, and likewise not music for all occasions. A product of late '60s moves (when I say 'cosmic flares' I'm not alluding to the fashionable loon-pants of the era!) towards 'free jazz', it nonetheless remains both structured enough, and varied enough in mood and approach, for me to enjoy it a lot, where the squalls of say Peter Brotzman's Machine Gun, recorded only a year later, I find simply confrontationally abrasive.

Allmusic.com describe Interstellar Space as 'Rousing if somewhat inaccessible music', which is, I think, pretty fair. Originally recorded in, I believe, 1967, it wasn't released at all until 1974, and then only in incomplete form. Now we can enjoy Leo and Jupiter Variation, in addition to Mars, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. Leo has something approaching a 'head' arrangement, and several cuts find Coltrane jingling some bells in the intros and outros. But other than that, these are just long, fairly free improvised duets between Coltrane and drummer Rashied Ali, who uses sticks on all cuts save when he picks up brushes on Venus.

Enough has been said about Coltrane, so, as a drummer, my props go to Rashied Ali, who's playing is staggering: without Ali backing 'Trane, this would be nigh-on unlistenable for me. Either element on it's own would, whilst perhaps fascinating for a little while, ultimately seem too one dimensional, at least for me. But together... Both players complement each other in a way that (I feel) much free jazz fails to observe; there's a real sense of sympathetic interplay and connection - i.e. listening - as opposed to simply making noise at the same time. And this especially true of Ali, as he supports 'Trane on his cosmic flights.
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