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Interesting Times: (Discworld Novel 17) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 1 Oct 2005


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Interesting Times: (Discworld Novel 17) (Discworld Novels) + Soul Music: (Discworld Novel 16) (Discworld Novels) + Men at Arms: A Discworld Novel: 14
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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; New Ed edition (1 Oct 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552153214
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552153218
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 601,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Marvellous Discworld, which revolves on the backs of four great elephants and a big turtle, spins into Interesting Times, the 17th outing in Terry Pratchett's rollicking fantasy series. The gods are playing games again, and this time the mysterious Lady opposes Fate in a match of "Destinies of Nations Hanging by a Thread". --Blaise Selby --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"This spinner of crazy science-fiction tales is a very sophisticated jester" The Times "Cracking dialogue, compelling illogic and unchained whimsy... Pratchett has a subject and a style that is very much his own" The Sunday Times "Imagine a collision between Jonathan Swift at his most scatalogically-minded and J.R.R Tolkein on speed... This total mess of - I suppose - a novel, is the joyous outcome" Daily Telegraph "Funny, delightfully inventive, and refuses to lie down in its genre" Observer "Like Dickens, much of Pratchett's appeal lies in his humanism, both in a sentimental regard for his characters' good fortune, and in that his writing is generous-spirited and inclusive" Guardian

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Jun 2000
Format: Paperback
As the Discworld has grown in strength and Pratchett has added ore and more characters to his milieu, it's nice to read a book that harkens back to the series' origins. Rincewind, the inept wizard, is reluctantly dragged out of retirement to journey to the Counterweight Continent who are asking for The Great Wizzard. Once there, he finds himself dragged into a civil war, a revolution and a theft, led by another old familiar, Cohen the Barbarian...and at the back of all this, the once tourist of Discword, Twoflower. Some people say that this book uses stereotypes too much...but Pratchett has always used those stereotypes, not only because it's funny, but because it says something about the people we are. Rincewind is still as he should be (running away) and pulling back familiar characters into a terrific story is a sure-fire winner.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on 29 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
With some minor magic, seasoned with a touch of quantum physics and a liberal dose of archeaology, Pratchett sends Rincewind the Wizzard across the Discworld. From Ankh Morpork, he arrives at the Agatean Empire on the Counterweight Continent, cushioned by a snowbank. Those studying Auriental history [knowing where the gold is] will recognize the failed wizzard is entering an alien environment. Luckily, familiar faces emerge. The first is the Discworld's most revered barbarian hero, Ghengiz Cohen - who is accompanied by some geriatric colleagues, the Silver Horde.
Rincewind isn't a tourist in the Agatean Empire, as Twoflower was in Ankh Morpork. He's been sent for in the midst of a political crisis. A dying emperor, five families contending for power, a revolutionary cadre and a mythical army must all be brought together to make this story work. Oh, yes, plus the Horde and Rincewind. Who else but Pratchett could seamlessly weave all these elements together? And keep you smiling with the turning of every page?
Yet, as usual, Pratchett does even more. He can maintain a balance between a reflection of ancient and modern China [sorry, Agatean Empire], bring forth a string of fascinating personalities and turn an impossible situation into reality without missing a beat. At the same time we are given a dose of chaos theory, familiar images of today's world politics and some philosophical images of the universality of human nature. For an added touch, something you won't see in any other "fantasy" novel, Pratchett's astute perception allows him to resurrect the 6 000 terra cotta warriors found in a tomb in China and have them march again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Nov 1998
Format: Hardcover
Quite possibly the funniest writer alive, Terry Pratchet stuns us again with this, the sixteenth book in the Discworld trilogy, Interesting Times. His brilliant wit and ability to stretch logic to it's limit and beyond, makes Interesting Times an "interesting" read to say the least.
Once again we find Rincewind battling (or rather trying to avoid and being caught up in) the forces of evil on the disc. We bump into the horde and go into the great city on the Counter Weight continent. We see a great battle and a rather intriguing butterfly.
Tossed and turned on life's great sea of adventure, Rincewind once again tries to live a normal and boring life, but no, he is cursed with that terrible curse that sounds something like... "May you live in interesting times".
A great book and a thoroughly good read. If you're a Pratchet fan you'll love it, if you're new to Pratchet, where've you been?!
Recommended to everyone!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on 22 Oct 2005
Format: Paperback
With some minor magic, seasoned with a touch of quantum physics and a liberal dose of archeaology, Pratchett sends Rincewind the Wizzard across the Discworld. From Ankh Morpork, he arrives at the Agatean Empire on the Counterweight Continent, cushioned by a snowbank. Those studying Auriental history [knowing where the gold is] will recognize the failed wizzard is entering an alien environment. Luckily, familiar faces emerge. The first is the Discworld's most revered barbarian hero, Ghengiz Cohen - who is accompanied by some geriatric colleagues, the Silver Horde.
Rincewind isn't a tourist in the Agatean Empire, as Twoflower was in Ankh Morpork. He's been sent for in the midst of a political crisis. A dying emperor, five families contending for power, a revolutionary cadre and a mythical army must all be brought together to make this story work. Oh, yes, plus the Horde and Rincewind. Who else but Pratchett could seamlessly weave all these elements together? And keep you smiling with the turning of every page?
Yet, as usual, Pratchett does even more. He can maintain a balance between a reflection of ancient and modern China [sorry, Agatean Empire], bring forth a string of fascinating personalities and turn an impossible situation into reality without missing a beat. At the same time we are given a dose of chaos theory, familiar images of today's world politics and some philosophical images of the universality of human nature. For an added touch, something you won't see in any other "fantasy" novel, Pratchett's astute perception allows him to resurrect the 6 000 terra cotta warriors found in a tomb in China and have them march again.
Read more ›
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