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Inspector Morse - The Settling Of The Sun [DVD]

3.2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

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Product details

  • Actors: John Thaw, Kevin Whately
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: ITV Studios Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 1 Aug. 2007
  • Run Time: 102 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003KTN320
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 43,757 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Another case for the ale-drinking Oxford detective. Morse (John Thaw) is himself present at a college dinner during which a Japanese student is murdered. His subsequent investigation reveals a complex web which stretches back to the Second World War and atrocities committed in POW camps.

From Amazon.co.uk

When Inspector Morse first appeared on television in 1987, nobody could have predicted that it would run into the next century, maintaining throughout a quality of scripts and storylines that raised the genre of the detective series to a new level. Much of its success can be attributed to John Thaw's total immersion in the role. Morse is a prickly character and not obviously easy to like. As a detective in Oxford with unfulfilled academic propensities, he is permanently excluded from a world of which he would dearly love to be a part. He is at odds with that world--and with his colleagues in the police force--most of the time. Passionate about opera and "proper beer", he is a cultural snob for whom vulgarity causes almost physical pain. As a result, he lives from one disillusionment to the next. And he is scarred--more deeply than he would ever admit--by past relationships. But he also has a naïve streak and, deep down, sensitivity, which makes him a fascinating challenge for women.

At the heart of Morse's professional life is his awkward partnership with Detective Sergeant Lewis, the resolutely ordinary, worldly sidekick who manages to keep his boss in an almost permanent state of exasperation while retaining his grudging respect. It's a testament to Kevin Whateley's consistently excellent performance that from such unpromising material Lewis becomes as indispensable to the series as Barrington Pheloung's hypnotic, classic theme music. Morse's investigations do occasionally take him abroad to more exotic locations, but throughout 14 successful years of often gruesome murders, the city of Oxford itself became a central character in these brooding two-hour dramas: creator Colin Dexter stating he finally had to kill Morse off because he was giving Oxford a bad reputation as a dangerous place! -- Piers Ford --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Dramatic and impressionistic opening scenes immediately capture the viewer's interest and involve him/her in dark mysteries. As opera plays in the background, Morse holds a program for an art show of "Images of Christ from Giotto to Dali, an aged cleric displays bleeding stigmata on his hands, and an Asian in a bamboo grove either kills or is killed. One of the most interestingly photographed of all the episodes, the Settling of the Sun is a feast for the eyes even as it reveals some darkly cynical attitudes at Oxford.

During an Oxford summer program for international students, a young Japanese man, Yukio Li, is found dead, his body laid out in a ritual pose. Several characters who have memories of World War II still have nightmares about the war, and they reveal their hatred of the Japanese because of wartime atrocities against British soldiers. As Morse begins to investigate the death of the student (referred to constantly as "the Japanese," rather than by his name), he finds that many characters are not who they seem to be, that some Asians are look-alikes for others (the old cliche), that some characters are secretly related to each other, and that Yukio Li may have been a drug smuggler, all elements which make this one of the less realistic, more melodramatic episodes in the series. The involvement of the foreign office suggests international intrigue, and a foreign service officer wants Morse off the case.

Other characters include a neurasthenic young female professor (for whom the viewer will feel no empathy), expounding anti-American sentiment for what she regards as American protection of Japanese war criminals; a second murder; and a patronizing attitude toward international students shown by all the principals.
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Format: VHS Tape
The plot seems somewhat contrived, and the malevolence shown by the perpetrators (including the Master of the college) towards the son of a Japanese war criminal seems to rather stretch the imagination. Moreover, one of the conspirators, the female professor Jane, seems to be remarkably cold-blooded for an apparently rather nice woman. How Morse can still feel sentimental towards her right at the end of the movie is difficult to comprehend. He should be congratulating himself for a lucky escape and having a good drink, not taking her a bunch of flowers in hospital.

But what really gets my goat about this film is the sheer sloppiness and ignorance of the writer in naming the Japanese character "Yukio Li". There is no such Japanese surname as Li. Chinese or Korean, yes, but Japanese, no. If the writer wanted an archtypical Japanese name (rather than archtypical Chinese or Korean, as Li is), why didn't he go for something like Nakamura or Watanabe? It's surprising that no-one else involved in the production picked up on this ridiculous mistake.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Bought this to replace faulty disc in complete set, same fault occurring in
this one. Jerky movement and voices out of sync, anyone else experienced this ?
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Format: DVD
The Inspector Morse episode "Settling of the Sun" arrived on time and in perfect condition, both disc and plastic case.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8f304060) out of 5 stars 13 reviews
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f0b8924) out of 5 stars Possiby the Darkest of All the Inspector Morse Films 16 Mar. 2002
By Wilson Smith - Published on Amazon.com
The undertones in "Setting of the Sun" deal with war and the moral repercussions thereof. Its direction is, along with "Service of All the Dead," among the most bleak and atmospheric of the Morse films. Another commonality which this film shares with the aforementioned film is its convoluted-yet-plausible plot, consisting of a rather intricate conspiracy theory. It may take a couple viewings for you to comprehend, it certainly did for me. Inspector Morse is asked to present a prize for a crossword competition at a summer school in Londsdale college for a group of overseas students. A murder conducted in a gruesome manner takes place while Morse is dining with the group. It turns out his presence was not incidental; he was meant to be a witness. Jane Robson's, Morse's love interest and the person who invited him to present the prize, feelings for Morse are not mutual in this episode. The uncertain long-term implications of war are beautifully presented at the end with the innocent view of Morse's love interest's daughter, when asked about her grandfather, whose suffering during the war was the impetus behind the conspiracy.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f567354) out of 5 stars incredible conspiracy 16 Aug. 2004
By Pamela Williams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Stories satisfy and entertain when the plot elements are believable. Unfortunately, this entry in the Morse series is one of the less satisfactory mysteries--- precisely because the plot centers on a very intricate and complex conspiracy which would disconcert even the most credulous viewer. The conspiracy strained credibility to the breaking point mainly because it required the active involvement or at least passive assent of several individuals for the events to unfold as intended; moreover, its success also depended heavily on the premise that absolutely nothing would go wrong. Inevitably, things do go

wrong and the conspirators' desire for justice/revenge (for acts committed during World War II) is realized--- but at a very high cost to themselves. Another scarcely believable element of this story involves Morse's attraction to the female academic who helped organize the conspiracy. In most of the episodes, Morse becomes involved with women who are flawed but appealing. The role of "Jane" in this mystery is distinctly unappealing, since her behavior generally involved tearfulness, temper tantrums, and mood swings. Very difficult to conceive of Morse being attracted to such a neurotic character. Despite the negative commentary in the preceding sentences, however, I still recommend viewing of this DVD to any avid Morse fan--- if for no other reason than the opportunity to render a personal opinion regarding the believability of this dark conspiracy.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f875654) out of 5 stars "I'm all for education--broadening the minds of foreigners." 23 Mar. 2007
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Dramatic and impressionistic opening scenes immediately capture the viewer's interest and involve him/her in dark mysteries. As opera plays in the background, Morse holds a program for an art show of "Images of Christ from Giotto to Dali, an aged cleric displays bleeding stigmata on his hands, and an Asian in a bamboo grove either kills or is killed. One of the most interestingly photographed of all the episodes, the Settling of the Sun is a feast for the eyes even as it reveals some darkly cynical attitudes at Oxford.

During an Oxford summer program for international students, a young Japanese man, Yukio Li, is found dead, his body laid out in a ritual pose. Several characters who have memories of World War II still have nightmares about the war, and they reveal their hatred of the Japanese because of wartime atrocities against British soldiers. As Morse begins to investigate the death of the student (referred to constantly as "the Japanese," rather than by his name), he finds that many characters are not who they seem to be, that some Asians are look-alikes for others, that some characters are secretly related to each other, and that Yukio Li may have been a drug smuggler, all elements which make this one of the less realistic, more melodramatic episodes in the series. The involvement of the foreign office suggests international intrigue, and a foreign service officer wants Morse off the case.

Other characters include a neurasthenic young female professor (for whom the viewer will feel no empathy), expounding anti-American sentiment for what she regards as American protection of Japanese war criminals; a second murder; and a patronizing attitude toward international students shown by all the principals.

Though the plot has problems, this episode is especially interesting because of the cinematography by Clive Tickner and the direction by Peter Hammond. Again and again, brilliant scenes capture the viewer's interest. Frequently, reflections in windows create an impressionistic vision of inside and outside activity, dripping water appears as a symbol throughout (water torture?), and the use of color, especially blood-red, adds depth to the presentation and visual interest to a plot that is too complex and full of coincidences to be plausible. Depicting a dark vision of humanity (and showing many of Oxford's staff in a less-than-admirable light), the Settling of the Sun is so magnificently photographed that anyone interested in the visual arts will be thrilled by this episode. n Mary Whipple
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f0b8cc0) out of 5 stars Not based on a Colin Dexter book 2 Aug. 2012
By K. O'Gorman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I just bought the 25th anniversary collection of the whole series and am watching them in order. I'd never seen this one before and I will most likely never watch it again. The 'Jane' character is outrageous all the way through...neither Morse or Lewis is in character...this episode is badly over-acted by the supporting cast, and the plot is convoluted. I love Morse and Lewis, but this is just awful. Please don't judge the series by this one story.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f0b8e4c) out of 5 stars Worth watching but a sub-standard "Morse" 3 Aug. 2013
By Oliver W. Bedford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
The plot seems somewhat contrived, and the malevolence shown by the perpetrators (including the Master of the college) towards the son of a Japanese war criminal seems to rather stretch the imagination. Moreover, one of the conspirators, the female professor Jane, seems to be remarkably cold-blooded for an apparently rather nice woman. How Morse can still feel sentimental towards her right at the end of the movie is difficult to comprehend. He should be congratulating himself for a lucky escape and having a good drink, not taking her a bunch of flowers in hospital.

But what really gets my goat about this film is the sheer sloppiness and ignorance of the writer in naming the Japanese character "Yukio Li". There is no such Japanese surname as Li. Chinese or Korean, yes, but Japanese, no. If the writer wanted an archtypical Japanese name (rather than archtypical Chinese or Korean, as Li is), why didn't he go for something like Nakamura or Watanabe? It's surprising that no-one else involved in the production picked up on this ridiculous mistake.
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