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Innocent Erendira and Other Stories (Perennial Classics (Paperback)) Paperback – Feb 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 183 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers; Reissue edition (Feb. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060751584
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060751586
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.1 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,231,141 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Marquez writes in this lyrical, magical language that no-one else can do (Salman Rushdie)

These stories abound with love affairs, ruined beauty, and magical women. It is essence of Marquez (Guardian)

'It becomes more and more fun to read. It shows what 'fabulous' really means' Time Out --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1927- ) was born in Aracataca, Colombia. His most recent book, Memories of My Melancholy Whores, is his first new novel to be published in a decade and is available as a Penguin Paperback from August 2007. He is the author of several novels, works of non-fiction and collections of short stories, including Leaf Storm (1955); One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967); The Autumn of the Patriarch (1975); Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1981) and The General in His Labyrinth (1989). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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First Sentence
ERÉNDIRA WAS BATHING her grandmother when the wind of her misfortune began to blow. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 April 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of 12 stories written by Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez. His most famous works are One Hundred Years of Solitude, The Autumn of the Patriarch and Love in the Time of Cholera (Vintage International). I've read them all, and like so many others, have been enthralled with his style and his sometimes whimsical insights into the human condition. This book is an odd assortment that the publisher yoked together. The last 11 short stories were written when Marquez was between 25 and 30, in the early `50's. One Hundred Years of Solitude was first published in the late `60's. Only the title story, the length of a novella, was written after his classic work, in the early `70's.

Concerning the 11 stories I call a "warm-up," well, they are just that. Certainly there is evidence of the themes and style that would be honed and polished into his major works. Overall though, they are rough, and two in particular, "Eyes of the Blue Dog" and "Night of the Curlews" should have been "left on the cutting room floor" as they say in the movies. Concerning these, and the others, there are times when the style he is famous for introducing, "magical realism," flips into outright hallucinations, worthy (or more appropriately, unworthy) of William Burroughs.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Jan. 1998
Format: Paperback
A wonderfull collection of stories with the best of Garcia Marquez' magical realism, which introduces the reader to life in Macondo and the author's writting style. I recommend you read this book before trying 100 years of solitude because the short stories are much simpler but just as amusing. Once you start reading it you won't be able to stop.
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Innocent Erendira is a adult fairy tale that lifts you out of the every day. The other stories are pre-occupied with death to the point of being bizzarre and are not so much a story as an exercise in ones ability to assimilate and understand the content. The women that came in at 6 o'clock is a good read, as is the sea of lost time and death constant beyond love.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. F. Lyon on 8 April 2009
Format: Paperback
I have read 7 or 8 of Marquez's books and this is by far the worst I have read. Some of the stories I just could not finish as for want of a better word, they were complete 'gibberish'. Maybe it is the translations or the fact that some were written over 50 years ago but I get a feeling that he is sometimes being too clever and the meaning gets completely lost.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Magically Real and Entertaining 21 Dec. 1999
By Ryan Dowd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Eréndira is a dark fairy tale covered in the blanket of magic realism that has become Gabriel García Márquez's trademark. The story itself unfolds like a bizarre daydream that follows a 14 year old Eréndira as she is plagued by the "wind of her misfortune." It is this wind that causes Eréndira to burn down her grandmother's lavish villa. Upon seeing the ruin and ashes the Grandmother informs Eréndira that "it would take a lifetime to back the debt you owe me." And so begins the young girl's life of prostitution. In order to earn back her money, the Grandmother sells Eréndira to countless men, day and night. It is only when Eréndira meets angelic Ulysses that her tortured life seemingly begins to change. Perhaps the most brilliant aspect of this movie is the role of the Grandmother. She is continually seated upon a throne-like chair, is incredibly fat and gaudy and devours cake by the handful; all while dispensing cryptic advice to Eréndira. The power that the Grandmother has over the life of Eréndira is shocking yet morbidly interesting, as is she. This strong presence is the reason that her character commands the most attention in the story. Her greed and voracious appetite for life are quite possibly representative of the many corrupt and powerful organizations and politicians that are present in Latin America and throughout the world. Eréndira is a compelling story to say the least. It is funny yet eerie, intriguing yet grotesque, and I thought it was amazing. Every piece of description and every word of dialogue work together to create the web of magic realism that dominates story line. If you like slightly dark stories of Latin American culture that have a magical twist, then Eréndira should be your first choice.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
An excellent way to start on Garcia Marquez and Macondo 4 Jan. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A wonderfull collection of stories with the best of Garcia Marquez' magical realism, which introduces the reader to life in Macondo and the author's writting style. I recommend you read this book before trying 100 years of solitude because the short stories are much simpler but just as amusing. Once you start reading it you won't be able to stop.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Read this book for the first story...it's a gem 6 Oct. 2006
By e. verrillo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Innocent Erendira and Other Stories should have been entitled Innocent Erendira and Sketches. The only real story is the title piece, The Incredible and Sad Tale of Innocent Erendira and Her Heartless Grandmother. The other stories are mood pieces about death--interesting, but only in the way Rembrandt's doodles might be interesting. They are worth looking at, but don't really stand on their own. The title piece, however, is a gem, filled with true Garcian flare--the Caribbean circus, frantic desert chases, strange gringos, exploding pianos, treasure, obsession, repression, confession, and hilarious one-liners. When Garcia Marquez pulls the stops out, there is nobody like him.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Warming up for the 100 years... 15 Sept. 2010
By John P. Jones III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a collection of 12 stories written by Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez. His most famous works are One Hundred Years of Solitude (P.S.), The Autumn of the Patriarch (P.S.) and (Love in the Time of Cholera (Vintage International)). I've read them all, and like so many others, have been enthralled with his style and his sometimes whimsical insights into the human condition. This book is an odd assortment that the publisher yoked together. The last 11 short stories were written when Marquez was between 25 and 30, in the early `50's. One Hundred Years of Solitude (P.S.) was first published in the late `60's. Only the title story, the length of a novella, was written after his classic work, in the early `70's.

Concerning the 11 stories I call a "warm-up," well, they are just that. Certainly there is evidence of the themes and style that would be honed and polished into his major works. Overall though, they are rough, and two in particular, "Eyes of the Blue Dog" and "Night of the Curlews" should have been "left on the cutting room floor" as they say in the movies. Concerning these, and the others, there are times when the style he is famous for introducing, "magical realism," flips into outright hallucinations, worthy (or more appropriately, unworthy) of William Burroughs. Marquez's sardonic view of the "democratic process," revealed in the electioneering and philandering of Senator Onesimo Sanchez will resonate with many a modern American reader. Death is a theme that is laced through many of these stories, and in particular, dominates "The Third Resignation," which appears to draw inspiration from Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Also in several of his stories, particularly in "Dialogue with the Mirror," he plays with the theme of a person's doppelganger - that eerie "other" who may accompany us. In "Eva is Inside her Cat," as the title might suggest, the author plays with the themes of the surrealistic painters, with insects under the skin causing a woman's beauty, which proves to be an immense burden. The reincarnation of choice is being a cat, but the dying mouse in one's mouth seems to spoil that fantasy. "The Woman who Came at 6'o'clock" involves the classic theme which has also become a cliché, the bartender who falls in love with a woman working in the world's oldest profession.

The title novella is clearly the best, and involves a ruthless grandmother pimping her granddaughter to obtain reparations for the grandmother's house that was burned down due to the carelessness of the granddaughter. Lots of sexual titillation, the proverbial "knight in shining armor," a dash of religion, and a much more refined dose of "magical realism."

Overall though, this book is probably only for hard-core Marquez fans, who have already read his major works. I'll round up to 4-stars, certainly in honor of the 100 years.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Colorful and easy to read. 29 Jun. 2001
By "designsoup" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Start off with "100 Years of Solitude", and then enjoy these short stories, they will take you back to a magical time that used to be. Marquez weaves his magic best in long, heady volumes, but these stories are not-to-be-missed for any fan of Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
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