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Inglourious Basterds [DVD] (2009)


Price: £7.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Inglourious Basterds [DVD] (2009) + Django Unchained  (DVD + UV Copy) [2013] + The Quentin Tarantino Collection [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, Michael Fassbender, Melanie Laurent, Eli Roth
  • Directors: Quentin Tarantino
  • Format: PAL, Dolby, Digital Sound, Anamorphic, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Arabic, Danish, Finnish, Hungarian, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish
  • Dubbed: Hungarian
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: None
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Universal Pictures UK
  • DVD Release Date: 7 Dec 2009
  • Run Time: 147 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (426 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001N2MZSY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,830 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

The new film from director Quentin Tarantino, Inglourious Basterds, begins in German-occupied France, where Soshanna Dreyfus (Melanie Laurent) witnesses the execution of her family at the hand of Nazi Colonel Hans Landa (Christoph Waltz). Soshanna narrowly escapes and flees to Paris, where she forges a new identity as the owner and operator of a cinema. Elsewhere in Europe, Lieutenant Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) organises a group of Jewish soldiers to engage in targeted acts of retribution. Known to their enemies as "The Basterds," Raine's squad joins German actress and undercover agent Bridget Von Hammersmark (Diane Kruger) on a mission to take down the leaders of the Third Reich. Fates converge under a cinema marquee, where Soshanna is poised to carry out a revenge plan of her own...

DVD Extras:
Extended & Alternated Scenes
  • Lunch with Goebbels – Extended Version (7 mins)
  • La Lousianne Card Game – Extended Version (2 mins)
  • Nation’s Pride Begins – Alternate Version (2 mins)
Nation’s Pride – Full Feature (6 mins)

Trailers
  • Teaser (1:43)
  • Domestic Trailer (2:21)
  • International Trailer (2:07)
  • Japanese Trailer (1:15)

From Amazon.co.uk

Although Quentin Tarantino has cherished Enzo G. Castellari's 1978 "macaroni" war flick The Inglorious Bastards for most of his film-geek life, his own Inglourious Basterds is no remake. Instead, as hinted by the Tarantino-esque misspelling, this is a lunatic fantasia of WWII, a brazen re-imagining of both history and the behind-enemy-lines war film subgenre. There's a Dirty Not-Quite-Dozen of mostly Jewish commandos, led by a Tennessee good ol' boy named Aldo Raine (Brad Pitt) who reckons each warrior owes him one hundred Nazi scalps--and he means that literally. Even as Raine's band strikes terror into the Nazi occupiers of France, a diabolically smart and self-assured German officer named Landa (Christoph Waltz) is busy validating his own legend as "The Jew Hunter." Along the way, he wipes out the rural family of a grave young girl (Melanie Laurent) who will reappear years later in Paris, dreaming of vengeance on an epic scale.

Now, this isn't one more big-screen comic book. As the masterly opening sequence reaffirms, Tarantino is a true filmmaker, with a deep respect for the integrity of screen space and the tension that can accumulate in contemplating two men seated at a table having a polite conversation. IB reunites QT with cinematographer Robert Richardson (who shot Kill Bill), and the colors and textures they serve up can be riveting, from the eerie red-hot glow of a tabletop in Adolf Hitler's den, to the creamy swirl of a Parisian pastry in which Landa parks his cigarette. The action has been divided, Pulp Fiction-like, into five chapters, each featuring at least one spellbinding set-piece. It's testimony to the integrity we mentioned that Tarantino can lock in the ferocious suspense of a scene for minutes on end, then explode the situation almost faster than the eye and ear can register, and then take the rest of the sequence to a new, wholly unanticipated level within seconds.

Again, be warned: This is not your "Greatest Generation," Saving Private Ryan WWII. The sadism of Raine and his boys can be as unsavory as the Nazi variety; Tarantino's latest cinematic protégé, Eli (director of Hostel) Roth, is aptly cast as a self-styled "golem" fond of pulping Nazis with a baseball bat. But get past that, and the sometimes disconcerting shifts to another location and another set of characters, and the movie should gather you up like a growing floodtide. Tarantino told the Cannes Film Festival audience that he wanted to show "Adolf Hitler defeated by cinema." Cinema wins. --Richard T. Jameson

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ja McLaughlin on 20 Jun 2012
Format: DVD
This is the kind of movie only Quentin Tarantino seems able to get away with. A typically irreverent, cunning and scatological piece of flotsam that does everything against the accepted movie-making conventions but mostly works nonetheless.

Watching it, I kept thinking about all those `how to write a screenplay' courses and instruction books and reflecting on how the writing for `Inglorious Basterds' would probably fail all the standard academic criteria for success. Here is a 153 minute long movie that largely consists of lengthy conversations between two or more characters, usually sitting statically at tables and ranging around all sorts of commonplace chit-chat before getting to the point. The point, when eventually reached, then usually climaxes in a short, brutal moment of extreme violence. The film also pays scant attention to its titular characters, who are mostly just there to supply the key moments of violence. Tarantino prefers to turn conventions around and promote nominal supporting roles into the predominant leads. Finally, there's the intriguing awareness that this screenplay could probably be adapted as a theatre play with minimal change and a pretty modest budget. In fact, if somebody told you the whole thing was a filmed stage play you'd probably believe it.

Tarantino's usual indulgences are as much to the fore as ever - pastiche, self-awareness, smugness, overlength and endless movie references. The whole thing starts with a lengthy tribute to the opening of Once Upon a Time in the West and another long scene, involving the French heroine played by Melanie Laurent, looks like something lifted straight from a late-50s New Wave classic by Goddard or Truffaut.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eddie on 26 Nov 2014
Format: DVD
It’s not usually a good thing for artists to peak early in their careers. Living up to the high standard achieved at this point is not easy. Quentin Tarantino set a high standard with Resevoir Dogs and nailed it with Pulp Fiction (certainly in my top ten of great films), but since then I believe that his work has steadily become self indulgent and uninteresting. Pulp Fiction was a fine film because it broke the rules regarding dialogue, making mundane conversation interesting. Its structure was taken out of chronological order, its characters were compelling and its nods to popular culture provided a solid framework. Most of all, it was fresh and unpretentious and above all, it worked.

Tarantino’s left-field approach has been applied to all of his major films and Inglorious Bastards is the latest to suffer. And boy, does it suffer.. The dialogue is mundane and it remains largely mundane, the structure comprises a series of set pieces which are linked only by the fact that they are broken up into overlong ‘chapters’, its characters are for the most part uninteresting and its frequent nods to other films turn it into a sort of ‘Spot the Reference’. He wallows in his knowledge of film and for me it’s becoming unbelievably tiresome. Here, we are drenched in the context of cinema from all sides and I felt as though I needed to find an island to stop myself from drowning. Write a film quiz book Quent, you might get my attention.

While the opening sequence is compelling, not least because of the Christopher Waltz character, a frightening mix of charm and evil, the rest of the film fails to live up to this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By KATN on 6 Dec 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I think this is Tarantino's best film. I was really rocked by it the first time I saw it, and was confirmed in my impression by a re-watching. It is quite violent, even for a Tarantino film, but is very, very engaging. There are many unforgettable scenes and pieces of dialogue and acting, and it has a very satisfying ending. Everyone who is in this is at their best - Diane Kruger, Brad Pitt, Michael Fassbender, Christopher Waltz, Til Schweiger, and, though this was the first thing I've seen her in - Mélanie Laurent - was excellent as well.
Waltz was brilliant as 'the bad guy', the kind of bad guy you really enjoy seeing on the screen yet despise at the same time and is convincingly threatening yet charismatic. As the biggest star by far, Brad Pitt could have made this film lopsided, but I think he fits into his role very well, and serves the scenes he's in without dominating them or pulling the focus towards him. I do think he is a very good actor.
Though I'm sure plenty would disagree, I think this is Tarantino's best, and I would be surprised (but also pleased) if he could better it. I really liked Jackie Brown and Pulp Fiction in particular, and I think these are his top 3. But we shall see!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By alex spencer on 24 July 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Great Tarantino!! Christoph Waltz is wonderful as in Django. What more can I say.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By rbmusicman TOP 100 REVIEWER on 8 Dec 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Do you know what, the film is so 'way-out' ....it's actually pretty good.
Maybe the best thing 'Quentin Tarantino' has done so far ?
The film itself contains glimpses of a warped reality from 'World War '2' along with a measure of 'graphic' violence, and of course much 'tongue -in -cheek' humour.
The story ? ....a novel and of course fictional early end to the war, prior to which 'a hit-squad' are placed in occupied 'France' around the time of the 'Normandy' landings, task.....to kill as many 'German's' as they possibly can.
As i say the film is pretty entertaining to watch, and is no question 'worth a spin'
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Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
Portuguese subtitles? 3 13 Feb 2014
Languages??? 16 13 Feb 2014
languages and subtitles on this dvd are: 7 18 Feb 2011
blu- ray subtitles 0 8 Dec 2010
Which Region is ? 0 5 Nov 2010
Digital copy included? 2 7 Jan 2010
Anyone else missing the 2nd disc on this edition? 3 30 Dec 2009
Portuguese subtitles? 1 28 Dec 2009
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