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The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery (Remastered 2014)
 
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The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery (Remastered 2014)

12 Feb 2014 | Format: MP3

4.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
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Product details

  • Label: J. Joes J. Edizioni Musicali
  • Copyright: (p) J. Joes J. Edizioni Musicali
  • Total Length: 43:50
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00HWO6KLA
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,368 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By an anonymous enthusiast on 13 Sep 2012
Format: Audio CD
If you asked a cross section of contemporary jazz guitarists to pick essential jazz guitar albums, this is one that they could all agree on. The Incredible Jazz Guitar is not only the album that announced to the jazz world that Wes Montgomery had arrived as a major force to be reckoned with, it is the record that caused many established players to re-evaluate their technique.

With many much-copied innovators, it can sometimes be hard to appreciate what made them so unique in the first place. This is not the case with Wes Montgomery. His choice to use the thumb rather than a plectrum to play notes was un-orthodox, and has never been matched let alone bettered. He was the first guitarist to play entire choruses in octaves, and his influential strategy of constructing a solo by starting with single notes, then progressing to octaves, and finally improvising with block chords is in full evidence here.

The choice of material is first rate. The album opens with a fast version of the Sonny Rollins composition Airegin, and includes a very beautiful version of Polkadots & Moonbeams played in octaves. In addition, Wes introduces some of his finest originals including the catchy Four On Six and the jazz waltz West Coast Blues. Listen out for the moment in his solo on Mr. Walker where he spontaneously comes up with a harmonic phrase later utilised in the Bond films.

With no let up in quality for 44 minutes, and consistently excellent support from Tommy Flanagan on piano, and two of the Heath brothers on bass and drums, how could you not purchase this pivotal album?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By an anonymous enthusiast on 13 Sep 2012
Format: Audio CD
If you asked a cross section of contemporary jazz guitarists to pick essential jazz guitar albums, this is one that they could all agree on. The Incredible Jazz Guitar is not only the album that announced to the jazz world that Wes Montgomery had arrived as a major force to be reckoned with, it is the record that caused many established players to re-evaluate their technique.

With many much-copied innovators, it can sometimes be hard to appreciate what made them so unique in the first place. This is not the case with Wes Montgomery. His choice to use the thumb rather than a plectrum to play notes was un-orthodox, and has never been matched let alone bettered. He was the first guitarist to play entire choruses in octaves, and his influential strategy of constructing a solo by starting with single notes, then progressing to octaves, and finally improvising with block chords is in full evidence here.

The choice of material is first rate. The album opens with a fast version of the Sonny Rollins composition Airegin, and includes a very beautiful version of Polkadots & Moonbeams played in octaves. In addition, Wes introduces some of his finest originals including the catchy Four On Six and the jazz waltz West Coast Blues. Listen out for the moment in his solo on Mr. Walker where he spontaneously comes up with a harmonic phrase later utilised in the Bond films.

With no let up in quality for 44 minutes, and consistently excellent support from Tommy Flanagan on piano, and two of the Heath brothers on bass and drums, how could you not purchase this pivotal album?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By an anonymous enthusiast on 22 May 2011
Format: Audio CD
If you asked a cross section of contemporary jazz guitarists to pick essential jazz guitar albums, this is one that they could all agree on. The Incredible Jazz Guitar is not only the album that announced to the jazz world that Wes Montgomery had arrived as a major force to be reckoned with, it is the record that caused many established players to re-evaluate their technique.

With many much-copied innovators, it can sometimes be hard to appreciate what made them so unique in the first place. This is not the case with Wes Montgomery. His choice to use the thumb rather than a plectrum to play notes was un-orthodox, and has never been matched let alone bettered. He was the first guitarist to play entire choruses in octaves, and his influential strategy of constructing a solo by starting with single notes, then progressing to octaves, and finally improvising with block chords is in full evidence here.

The choice of material is first rate. The album opens with a fast version of the Sonny Rollins composition Airegin, and includes a very beautiful version of Polkadots & Moonbeams played in octaves. In addition, Wes introduces some of his finest originals including the catchy Four On Six and the jazz waltz West Coast Blues. Listen out for the moment in his solo on Mr. Walker where he spontaneously comes up with a harmonic phrase later utilised in the Bond films.

With no let up in quality for 44 minutes, and consistently excellent support from Tommy Flanagan on piano, and two of the Heath brothers on bass and drums, how could you not purchase this pivotal album?
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By BobH on 21 Mar 2013
Format: Audio CD
I bought 'The Incredible Guitar of Wes Montgomery' (1960) as an LP over fifty years ago and it quickly made its way into my top 3 jazz records as the tit;e is so well-deserved. It's stayed there throughout all the years. I may prefer the individualised performances of Joe Pass but Wes Montgomery stands supreme when playing as a member of a combo. Notice how tightly he fits in with other musicians - later shown on the recordings he made with his brothers. Note also that 50% of the pieces on this CD were composed by Wes Montgomery, a natural genius.
Wes was self-taught and demonstrates this by doing things he 'shouldn't, such as improvising in octaves and part-chords. I also prefer the softer tone produced by his use of the thumb instead of a plectrum, never quite achieved by others by simply adjusting the amp's output.
From the very start 'Airegin' displays Wes's inventive phrasing, including his dynamic use of octaves and chords. with Tommy Flannigan (piano) filling in nicely in the background and Percy Heath (bass) providing a strong driving force.
There's a poignant air about 'D-Natural Blues' and then it suddenly picks up tempo with Wes doing the driving with a surprising self-confidence.
'Polka dots and Moonbeams' is not quite so successful, at least to me, as it lacks the natural 'swing' of Wes's style. This is shown in later recordings, accompanied by massed strings - and sometimes on 'Bags meets Wes' with Milt Jackson.
The next track, 'Four on Six' plunges the quartet right back in a real driving piece with the trust of bass (Percy Heath)and the lyricism of the piano backed by chord punctuations from Wes
Then one of my favourites, 'West Coast Blues' demonstrates the timing of Wes as he sits on top of fine support, notably by Albert Heath on drums.
Read more ›
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