The Incomparable Christ and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.81
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minor scuffing to the corners of the cover - no creasing to spine - light marking to edges of pages otherwise unmarked
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Incomparable Christ (The London lectures in contemporary Christianity) Paperback – 21 Sep 2001


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.26
Paperback, 21 Sep 2001
£7.19 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: IVP (21 Sept. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0851114857
  • ISBN-13: 978-0851114859
  • Product Dimensions: 13.6 x 1.9 x 23 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 509,358 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Clarity, conciseness and insightful commentary are among his gifts
.. in this project he excels. -- Chris Tilling; Christianity; February 2002

Stott provides a profound insight into the nature of Christ ...
-- Jason Gardner; eg (LICC magazine); December 2001

From the Back Cover

"Regardless of what anyone may personally think of him or
believe about him, Jesus of Nazareth has been the dominant figure in the
history of western culture for almost twenty centuries." Jaroslav Pelikan

Jesus Christ has been the centre of history for two thousand years, and his
birth the pivot of our calendar. He is the focus of Scripture: as Luther
declared, the entire Scripture deals only with Christ everywhere. He is
the heart of mission, the message that countless Christians cross land and
sea, continents and cultures, to deliver.

In masterly surveys, John Stott looks at the New Testament witness, at the
way the church has portrayed Christ down the centuries, at the influence
Christ has had on individuals over the last two thousand years. Finally,
turning to the book of Revelation, he asks what Jesus Christ should mean to
us today. Here is the fruit of a lifetime of biblical study, rigorous
Christian thought, and devotion to the person of Christ.

Review
David Edwards describes John Stott as, with the exception of William
Temple, 'as the most influential clergyman in the Church Of England of the
20th century'.
It was appropriate, therefore, that for the millennium "London Lectures",
in fact founded by John Stott, he should have been invited to be the
lecturer. The topic in such a year could be none other than Jesus - 'The
Incomparable Christ'- a magnificent four-part overview of Jesus Christ
based upon these lectures.

Each Lecture is worked up into a section of the book:
the biblical record - 'The Original Jesus';
the teaching of the Church - 'The Ecclesiastical Jesus';
personal responses from great people - 'The Influential Jesus'; and the
challenge for today - 'The Eternal Jesus'.

As we might expect from John Stott, the book deals with issues in depth but
in a way that is easily accessible.

The final section of the book presents the eternal Jesus, interestingly
presented to us through comment upon the Book of Revelation. Here we have
what is almost a mini-commentary, taking this most difficult book and
showing us "the eternal Christ who never changes, but who challenges us to
follow him today".

This is a book to treasure, to stretch our minds and to be a helpful
resource in years to come. Above all else, it lifts up Jesus Christ, just
as John Stott has done in his lifetime of ministry.

Martin Turner
Methodist Recorder


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book in four parts about Jesus in the New Testament, how the church has presented Jesus through the ages, how Jesus has inspired people through history and how we are challenged today by Jesus. Stott gives an amazing vision of Jesus, packing a lot of detail into his text. Yet with all this detail it remains and easy, flowing read, as well as being a great reference book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Stefano Guaglione on 1 Oct. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would like to have all the books of John Stott.. this is very useful for deep studies and I suggest even THE CROSS OF CHRIST
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Maybe the best of the Jesus books. 30 Sept. 2002
By David Marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is the first book I have read by John Stott, and am impressed. I quickly came to the conclusion that here was an author whose opinion carries weight. No hackneyed collection of classic quotes and tired connect-the-dots reasoning, the book exhibits rich scholarship, broad range, and a wise combination of boldness and caution. He discusses both Jesus as a historical person (and I agree with him that the "historical Jesus" is the "Christ of faith"), and the influence of Jesus on history, through intermediaries not so unlike you and I.
Some of the people Stott discusses,(offering mostly positive but I think balanced critiques of Wilberforce and Gandhi, for examples, and a deservedly negative review of the Jesus seminarians) have been written about often enough elsewhere. But Stott makes the story fresh because he thinks for himself, reads a lot, and displays a depth of background knowledge such that his evaluation carries weight. Others of whom Stott writes, Justin Martyr, N.T. Wright, and Toyohiko Kagawa, I agree ought to be better known. Some (St. Benedict) were new to me. Whether famous or forgotten, Stott establishes himself as a trustworthy and wise guide from page one to the end.
Not that he is necessarily right about everything. I disagree with his view of the Crusades. Certainly Stott does not cover everything worth covering. (The Clapham Sect also deeply influenced India, for example. See Farquhar, Crown of Hinduism, and Mangalwadi, Missionary Conspiracy, etc.) This is only one book, and Christ is not only incomparable, but also incomprehensible, in the historical sense: a river of influence whose channels and depths and end no one standing on our side of the bank can fully know. But Stott generally notices what is important in those topics he does discuss. Even his take on that mysterious, strange book of Revelation does not overlook the obvious, as so many do: that in some sense at least, the book sure is inspired.
Yancey, Wright, and Polkinghorne are also worth reading on the "historical Jesus." There are some good books out there on the influence of Christ on history. But all in all, and combining both, this may be the best of the Jesus books I have read so far. (Along with my own, Jesus and the Religions of Man, which naturally I also recommend.)
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Incomparable Christ. 18 Mar. 2005
By Wesley L. Janssen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Some have said that the Anglican/Episcopalian church is "the thinking man's church" (although there may be some concern regarding the church in North America) and I must say there is some evidentiary merit in this assessment. To a list of excellent expositors that includes C.S. Lewis, John Polkinghorne, Desmond Tutu, and Alister McGrath, based on this volume, I may need to add John Stott. This book is very strong throughout.
The book is structured in four parts. I/ The Original Jesus (the New Testament accounts [excepting Revelation, that being treated in part 4]); II/ The Ecclesiastical Jesus (Jesus as the church has presented him); III/ The Influential Jesus (the inspirational influence Jesus has had on selected individuals): IV/ The Eternal Jesus (how Jesus challenges us today).
Any time a writer undertakes an exegetical treatment of the book of Revelation (part four of this volume) he will [necessarily] put forward disputed understandings. But in this reader's opinion, Stott is near masterful here. Some rather popular but poorly considered literalizations and convoluted embellishments are gently but firmly 'left behind.'

Each of the four parts is so good that no one stands above the others. I appreciated Stott's consideration, in part two, of Thomas a Kempis' "Imitation of Christ", a long esteemed devotional classic that unfortunately promulgates some sorely deficient theology. I was happy to find that others have observed this (my amazon.com review of that volume was not well received). Churchmen have, in many instances, presented some poorly developed Christology. Inevitably our ideas about Jesus fall short of the profundity, mystery, and beauty of the incomparable Christ. Sometimes, the Teacher who's "burden is light" has been taught by men as being far too burdensome. Stott relates: "Procrustes in Greek mythology was a brutal robber who compelled his victims to fit the dimensions of his iron bed. If they were too short, he stretched them. If they were too long, he chopped off their feet. The Christian Procrustes exhibits a similar inflexibility, forcing Jesus into his or her way of thinking and resorting to ruthless measures in order to secure his conformity. From Procrustes and all his disciples, good Lord, deliver us!" (p128)
Stott's book is highly recommended, particularly for the individual who's understanding of Christian faith might be focused upon his own excellent (of course) doctrine or his personal affinity for a stilted "old time religion".
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Maybe the best of the Jesus books. 30 Sept. 2002
By David Marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is the first book I have read by John Stott, and am impressed. I quickly came to the conclusion that here was an author whose opinion carries weight. No hackneyed collection of classic quotes and tired connect-the-dots reasoning, the book exhibits rich scholarship, broad range, and a wise combination of boldness and caution. He discusses both Jesus as a historical person (and I agree with him that the "historical Jesus" is the "Christ of faith"), and the influence of Jesus on history, through intermediaries not unlike you and I.
Some of the people Stott discusses,(offering mostly positive but I think balanced critiques of Wilberforce and Gandhi, for examples, and a deservedly negative review of the Jesus seminarians) have been written about often enough elsewhere. But Stott makes the story fresh because he thinks for himself, reads a lot, and has a depth of background knowledge such that his evaluation carries weight. Others of whom Stott writes, Justin Martyr, N.T. Wright, and Toyohiko Kagawa, I agree ought to be better known. Some (St. Benedict) were new to me. Whether famous or forgotten, Stott establishes himself as a trustworthy and wise guide from page one to the end.
Not that he is necessarily right about everything. I disagree with his view of the Crusades. Certainly Stott does not cover everything worth covering. (The Clapham Sect also deeply influenced India, for example. See Farquhar, Crown of Hinduism, and Mangalwadi, Missionary Conspiracy, etc.) This is only one book, and Christ is not only incomparable, but also incomprehensible, in the historical sense: a river of influence whose channels and depths and end no one standing on our side of the bank can fully know. But Stott generally notices what is important in those topics he does discuss. Even his take on that mysterious, strange book of Revelation does not overlook the obvious, as so many do: that in some sense at least, the book is certainly inspired.
Yancey, Wright, and Polkinghorne are also worth reading on the "historical Jesus." There are some good books out there on the influence of Christ on history. But all in all, and combining both, this may be the best of the Jesus books I have read so far. (Apart from my own, Jesus and the Religions of Man, which naturally I also recommend.) I will be looking for more books by this author.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good and Informative 5 July 2013
By Grant Marshall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book and learned a lot, even as one who has read a lot of books about Jesus. I bought this book because its breadth covering everything from the New Testament & Church History to Modern Scholarship, and Contemporary Culture. It closes with a fairly in-depth look at the book of Revelation in relation to Christ. His analysis of the Gospels is fantastic. He really captured the essence of each Gospel in a single statement. But I got the feeling that he tried to make Epistles fit into the same mould. In particular James - Christ the moral teacher? Stott also completely ignored the two kinds of righteousness James talks about, and doesn't really resolve the supposed conflict between Paul and James.

I really enjoyed the section on the Ecclesiastical Jesus. I learned an awful lot about some figures in Church history I had very little knowledge of before. Stotts analysis was fair and even handed, but at times was contradictory. The Chapter on St Benedict was critical of monasticism for setting itself up as a superior way to be Christian and for its withdrawal from the world. Yet He didn't St Francis of Assisi for doing much the same thing. He seemed hold him in much higher esteem. His chapter on the Imitation of Christ offered a fantastic criticism of this very much loved book.

His criticisms of Wright's "Jesus and the Victory of God" were off and out of context. To pick one of Wright's final statements that Jesus didn't "know" he was God in the sense that one knows one has eaten an orange is a little unfair. There is so much good material and a solid defense of historic Christianity in Wright's work that anyone who has read Wright will groan reading Stott's criticism. Stott would have done better to try and summarise the overall thrust of Wright's work.

In His section on Revelation 6-7 Stott sees the rider of the White Horse as Christ riding to win the nations through the Gospel. While I like the sentiment the only connection to Christ is that the horse is White, but apart from that the rider bears no relation to Christ.

Ultimately what is fantastic about the book is also it's downfall. The book attempts to cover too much ground in too short a space. If I had my way each section would be a separate book of around 500 pages of in-depth analysis. But for what the book sets out to do it does accomplish to some degree. I enjoyed the book, and have benefited from Stotts deep love for Jesus and resolve to know nothing but Christ Crucified. My concerns aside this is still a great book well worth reading.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Jesus. 1 Sept. 2009
By M. Holden - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
John Stott shares Jesus in a profound scholarly light while maintaining the true and passionate heart felt response to Him as God and Savior. "The Incomparable Christ" is a book that guides readers through what the Bible says about who Jesus is as well as paints a vivid picture of Church history as they have portrayed Christ. Always, Stott brings his listeners back to Biblical Truth.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback