In Bed with the Tudors and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£16.00
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £4.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £2.17
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In Bed with the Tudors: The Sex Lives of a Dynasty from Elizabeth of York to Elizabeth I Hardcover – 10 Jul 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.00
£9.95 £8.66

Frequently Bought Together

In Bed with the Tudors: The Sex Lives of a Dynasty from Elizabeth of York to Elizabeth I + Elizabeth of York: The Forgotten Tudor Queen + Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses
Price For All Three: £38.99

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.17
Trade in In Bed with the Tudors: The Sex Lives of a Dynasty from Elizabeth of York to Elizabeth I for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.17, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Amberley Publishing; First Edition edition (10 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1445606933
  • ISBN-13: 978-1445606934
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 381,577 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Amy Licence is an historian of women's lives in the medieval and early modern period, from Queens to commoners. Her particular interest lies in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century, in gender relations, Queenship and identity, rites of passage, pilgrimage, female orthodoxy and rebellion, superstition, magic, fertility and childbirth. She is also interested in Modernism, specifically Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group, Picasso and Post-Impressionism.

Amy has written for The Guardian, The TLS, The New Statesman, BBC History, The English Review, The Huffington Post, The London Magazine and other places. She has been interviewed regularly for BBC radio and made her TV debut in "The Real White Queen and her Rivals" documentary, for BBC2, in 2013. She also writes literary fiction and has been shortlisted twice for the Asham Award.

Her website can be found at amylicence.weebly.com

She is the mother of two boys and lives in Canterbury.

Product Description

About the Author

Amy Licence has been a teacher for over a decade. She has an MA in Medieval and Tudor Studies and has published several scholarly articles on the Tudors. She lives in Canterbury.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful By EleanorB TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 24 Sep 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a very, very good little book. It is packed with superbly researched material which gives a vivid sense of daily life in the Tudor period, particularly female daily life with its unique challenges and pressures in relation to conception and birth. This is not, as might be inferred from the title, in any way a titillating book; rather it is quite a scholarly work which sheds a completely different light on the endlessly fascinating Tudor dynasty.

What emerges is a picture of female life in which the main business of being a woman (queen or otherwise) was the production of children. This was the destiny, indeed the career, of all but those who adopted the religious life or were barren for whatever reason, A hard destiny it was: obstetric care was rudimentary, infection control was unknown, superstition was rife, pain relief virtually non-existent and both maternal and infant mortality scarily frequent, particularly, but not exclusively amongst extremely young wives - Margaret Beaufort (mother of Henry the Seventh) was married at 13 and lucky to survive that one and only pregnancy.

For a queen, under pressure to deliver a nursery full of heirs, the constant need to conceive was simply a fact of life and took no account of personal inclination. I wonder if the pressure exerted by Henry the Eighth in this respect actually worked against him by placing his wives, particularly Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, in such a constant state of anxiety. Of course, the woman who did follow her personal inclination, Elizabeth the First, was regarded as positively unnatural for rejecting the perils of motherhood.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Book Reviewer on 30 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is shocking. Frequent spelling mistakes, repetitive, repeating the same facts throughout different chapters. Contains more than a few historical inaccuracies: Licence says Anne Boleyn was the daughter of the Duke of Norfolk, funny that, I thought she was his niece?!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Karenf on 22 Oct 2012
Format: Hardcover
While this book covers areas on childbirth, marriage etc and gives good insight into the medical knowledge and superstitions surrounding childbirth the author has slipped up on her research.
For example on page 136 she states that Anne Boleyn is the daughter of the duke of Norfolk. Anne was the niece of the duke not his daughter. There are numerous other errors in the book and for me this lets it down.
I hope that when the book goes to paperback, the publishers will have edited the book and corrected the blatant errors.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J Gozzi on 28 Jan 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Ms. Licence has obviously done a lot of research, and the book is interesting, but factual mistakes plus mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation (probably very sloppy editing or transcription into Kindle format) undermine the rest of the book's credibility. It's a shame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By KAW on 26 Sep 2013
Format: Hardcover
This was good on the general life and conditions of women in Tudor times, but less so on the Tudor dynasty itself, especially on the male members. There was a lot about Tudor childbed, in fact it gets quite repetitive, but much of the information and opinion on the Tudor monarchs appears to be gleaned from secondary sources. If I want to know what David Starkey or Alison Weir think I can read their books I do not expect to see it repackaged in the work of another author. Many of the positive reviews say how unusual this book is but in fact most books on the Tudors cover the subjects raised here extensively and for a really insightful and well researched look at women's sexuality (albeit slightly later in history) try The Weaker Vessel by Antonia Fraser. There were some mistakes and dubious historical opinion not fully explained, for example p163 "Anne's brother George, accused of incest, homosexuality and adultery.." Some writers have speculated about his homosexuality, I cannot find any evidence that he was charged with it. There are inconsistencies p212 we are told that Henry viii entailed the throne upon the heirs of his sister "Mary Rose, rather than his own daughters.." Which is not true (and why does she keep referring to the King's sister as Mary Rose)when later p223 it is correctly stated that the heirs of Mary were given preference to the heirs of Margaret Tudor, but doesn't put right the statement that Henry disinherited his own daughters.
Finally there are too many "may haves" summed up by this extremely pointless example p 176 "The truth may have been more complex. It may not have been."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By LJ on 10 April 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book is okay in general but approach with caution, it is littered with spelling mistakes throughout, which are more obvious in some places than others. Also, the book can get quite repetitive with the same facts repeated and re-packaged in a various number of chapters. More importantly, however, is the fact that the book is also littered in places with historical inaccuracies. For example on page 136, the author states that Anne Boleyn was the daughter of the Duke of Norfolk, when in fact she was his niece. Whilst the book was easy to read and accessible, basic mistakes such as this makes the reader question the authenticity and accuracy of other so-called 'facts'. Quite frankly, this is disappointing from an author who has an MA in Medieval and Tudor studies.

I would not recommend for die-hard history fans, with a particular interest in the Tudor period.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback