Imperial Bedrooms and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: £1.77

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Imperial Bedrooms on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Imperial Bedrooms [Unabridged] [Hardcover]

Bret Easton Ellis
3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £3.59  
Hardcover, Unabridged --  
Paperback £5.99  
Audio Download, Unabridged £11.35 or Free with Audible.co.uk 30-day free trial
Audio, CD, Audiobook --  

Book Description

2 July 2010
Twenty-five years on from Less Than Zero, we pick up again with Clay

Frequently Bought Together

Imperial Bedrooms + Less Than Zero
Buy the selected items together
  • Less Than Zero £7.19

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; 1 edition (2 July 2010)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 0330449761
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330449762
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 1.9 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 334,191 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bret Easton Ellis is also the author of Less Than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, The Informers, Glamorama, Lunar Park and Imperial Bedrooms, and his work has been translated into twenty-seven languages. He lives in Los Angeles.

Product Description

Review

'The cult author's brilliant, disturbing 1985 debut - about the empty lives of LA teenagers - was a literary smash at the time, and is being re-released ahead of next month's much-anticipated follow-up Imperial Bedrooms - a book that will be THE cultural ralking point of the summer. Read or re-read now.' --Grazia - The Barometer

'You won't read a better book this summer. Nasty but nice.'
-- Art Review

'Cunningly weaving his personal anxieties into this fictional story reminds us that, no matter how nihilistic and derogatory Ellis's work may seem, at it's core is a writer who is deeply concerned with the direction our culture is taking.' --HUH magazine

'The poster boy for `80's excess returns with this sequel to Less Than Zero. Twenty-five years on, LA's spoilt rich kids are all grown up but still embroiled in the debauchery of Hollywood. Here, Ellis displays a newly emotional and sinister tone. A creepy, brutal, absorbing read.' --Grazia

'In 1983, Bret Easton Ellis wrote Less Than Zero, pretty much the ultimate teen novel. In this sequel the same characters are just as wasted and rich. A frantic and funny glimpse of the darker side of Hollywood, it makes you ask, "Is this what it's like on The Hills?' --Heat

'In terms of American literary inheritance, Easton Ellis adds the playful self-advertisements of Philip Roth to the ambiguously complicit social reportage of F Scott Fitzgerald. Imperial Bedrooms ranks with his best exercises in the latter register, teeming with sharp details of a narcissistic generation.' --Guardian

'Densely, even hectically plotted. Carrying an epigraph from Raymond Chandler, it is a murder mystery - a woozy, paranoid, hallucinatory version of LA noir.'
--Sunday Times

'Imperial Bedrooms itself is almost defiantly appalling and sickening, but it is also brilliantly written and coolly self-aware...[it] has a thriller's pace and structure, drawing momentum from our desire to find out who is behind the hideous mutilation of a body displayed a few pages in. At the same time, like it or not, the novel dabbles in philosophical waters...Here, as in Less Than Zero, Ellis is plumbing the depths of human nature, exposing it at its worst. His writing is existentialist to the extent that it confronts the minimal limits of identity.' --Observer

'If you want to feel a whole lot better about your life, revisit Bret Easton Ellis's seminal Eighties' hedonists from Less Than Zero in the apocalyptic Imperial Bedrooms.' --InStyle UK Culture Club

'Ellis deserves his cult status and there is no sense of him going soft on us here. The wry dialogue, the brittle, heartless sex, and the sense of civilisation tumbling as the LA brat pack (now middle-aged) grab and fornicate are no less powerful . . . you won't want to miss this one.' --Readers Digest

'Ellis is a moralist, engaged in a confrontation with "things like that", the things writers worry about, the question of "what else isn't real" in the social world they inhabit. In his ostensibly archly amoral books, he worries about the consequences of affectlessness, the instrumentalisation of human relations, the tyranny of the sleek surfaces that are his main cultural inheritance. . . Above all, he wants to know why - or rather when - people become monsters. At what point, at what threshold of pain or numbness does the human disappear?' --Financial Times

'Bret Easton Ellis's Imperial Bedrooms is his tautest, most compulsively readable work since American Psycho.' --The Observer

'Ellis, a self-confessed moralist, has suggested that far from offering a celebration of evil and of nihilism, he is presenting an examination of it. The nascent narcissist of Less Than Zero has lost all ability to empathise, switched off his humanity, and is now left in a 'dead end'. In that, it is a deeply pessimistic presentation of human nature as assailable, and in Clay's case, incapable of transformation; but also, perhaps, an unflinching study of evil.' --Independent

'As in Lunar Park, the deliberate blurring of fiction and reality seems both an attempt to increase the book's verisimilitude, and a sort of jokey way of making a book, which like almost all of his fiction, deals with hard-core material, seem even more sulphurous. . . Although American Psycho will always be Ellis's most graphic novel, Imperial Bedrooms is in many ways even more disturbing. American Psycho, Ellis always claimed, had a moral and satirical intent; Imperial Bedrooms is nothing but nihilism (not a criticism)...Imperial Bedrooms is a wonderfully merciless novel: where once was glamour we now find only horror.' --Sunday Telegraph

'Ellis writes effortlessly well. Sex, drugs and facelifts galore.' --Tatler

'Dark and tense, this tale of degeneration, murder and bleak emotional lives is sad and shocking. Easton Ellis's perspective is unchanged - hedonism does not equal happiness.' --Marie Claire

'Eason Ellis has pulled off another amazing feat, by opening another elucidating window onto a very modern and very hollow world.' --Daily Mirror

'Dark and tense, this tale of generation, murder and bleak emotional lives is sad and shocking. Easton Ellis's perspective is unchanged - hedonism does not equal happiness.' --Marie Claire

'Ellis has returned to the sparse, terse prose of his debit with startling effect. A timely expose of how shocking it is when nothing's shocking anymore.' --Big Issue

'The most pressing question to which Ellis tries to find an answer in this disturbing novel is why and when human beings begin to lose their soul, and how their humanity starts to disappear, bit by bit.' --New Statesman

'In the neon-lit corners of Easton Ellis Land, life is still defined by boredom and lubricated by cash. And even 25 years on, his characters will have a whole lot of growing up to do. . . It is shocking, powerful and incisive.' --Spectator

'Deeply noirish and at times shockingly violent . . . The American Psycho authors does not disappoint here.' --City AM

'Imperial Bedrooms is about more than mere creative megalomania, Its bleached-out surfaces, botched plastic surgery victims and morally anorexic characters reflect an uncompromising dead-end Gothic nihilism.' --Metro

'[Imperial Bedrooms] is a deeply pessimistic presentation of human nature as assailable, and in Clay's case, incapable of transformation; but also, perhaps, an unflinching study of evil.' --Belfast Telegraph

'A brilliant post-modern opening.' --The List

'More serious, more subtle and more sophisticated and with a more serious moral purpose.' --Tribune

'Gruesome but always gripping critiques of modern living.' --TES

'Imperial Bedrooms is a wonderfully merciless novel.' -- Sunday Telegraph

'What's most remarkable about this sequel is that even though a quarter of a century has passed since the first instalment, everything about is eerily timely and puke-out-loud pertinent. . . Imperial Bedrooms is vintage Bret Easton Ellis. It's nice, and sort of awfully at the same time. To have him back.' --Dazed and Confused

Book Description

In 1985, Bret Easton Ellis shocked, stunned and disturbed with Less Than Zero, his ‘extraordinarily accomplished first novel’ (New Yorker), successfully chronicling the frightening consequences of unmitigated hedonism within the ranks of the ethically bereft youth of 80s Los Angeles. Twenty-five years later, Ellis returns to those same characters – to Clay and the band of infamous teenagers whose lives weave sporadically through his – but now, they face an even greater period of disaffection: their own middle age. Clay seems to have moved on – he’s become a successful screenwriter – but when he returns from New York to Los Angeles, to help cast his new movie, he’s soon drifting through a long-familiar circle. Blair, his vulnerable former girlfriend, is now married to Trent – still a bisexual philanderer – and their Beverly Hills parties attract excessive levels of fame and fortune. Clay’s childhood friend Julian is a recovering addict running an ultra-discreet, high-class escort service, and their old dealer Rip, reconstructed and face-lifted nearly beyond recognition, is involved in activities far more sinister than those of his notorious past. After a meeting with a gorgeous but talentless actress determined to win a role in his movie, Clay finds himself connected with Kelly Montrose, a producer whose gruesomely violent death is suddenly very much the talk of the town. As his seemingly endless proclivity for betrayal leads him to be drawn further and further into this ominous case it looks like he will face far more serious consequences than ever before.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "I never liked anyone and I'm afraid of people" 6 July 2010
By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The old gang from "Less Than Zero" are revisited in a sort of sequel, "Imperial Bedrooms". They were wasted as teenagers and they're wasted in middle age. Trent Burroughs is married to Blair, Julian Wells is around, Rip Millar is creepier than the last time, while Clay is as vapid and self-absorbed as ever.

The story begins with a film Clay wrote and is helping produce, "The Listeners", where he meets a desperate and beautiful actress, Rain Turner, who will do anything for a starring role. Clay and Rain become involved but then the murders start happening and Clay doesn't realise what he's gotten himself into nor who Rain really is. Mysterious texts follow sackings of his flat and blue/green BMWs stalking Clay wherever he goes. Somehow his "friends" are all tied into this and Clay has to decide who to trust...

If not for the characters' names this could easily be a standalone book rather than a sequel. Besides finding out that our heroes of "Less" turn out to be older and still behave like they did 25 years ago, it's not exactly a revelatory update. But that's fine because the book is more than the better for it. It launches straight into the story. The story seems very The Hills/The OC in style; it's all about who slept with who, what their game is, jilted love, revenge, etc. except for several horrific scenes. I'm thinking of what Clay does to the two hookers at the end and the grotesque murder (all detailed) of one of the main characters by another. Also, while this is a Hollywood novel, Ellis doesn't do what most Hollywood novels do and inject satire or parody into the story. It's a straightfoward serious story that plays off of perceived Hollywood stereotypes to construct something original.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lying In The Dark 25 Mar 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Less Than Zero is one of my favourite books so I was wary of reading Imperial Bedrooms in case it failed to repeat the magic of that first novel. Bret Easton Ellis as a writer has gone on a long journey with his novels, growing more confident and extravagant with each book. After Glamorama he stripped his writing style down to the bone to produce the soul searching Lunar Park. Now he returns with a sequel to his debut novel Less Than Zero. We return to find the previous characters older but still floundering in their own narcissism. There are no heroes here only rich creatures who suffer from the same old alienation and paranoia that haunted them in Less Than Zero. This time round the protagonist Clay is more like Patrick Bateman from American Psycho, with a much darker side to his personality. To summarise if you like Bret Easton Ellis you'll love this story where he writes with his usual fantastic and unique style. It's not always easy reading but it's worth every minute of your time. Disappear here and enjoy.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Overall, I enjoyed this more than Less Than Zero because whilst it is written in the same detatched, minimal style, the plot is more linear and eventful. It's written in the typical Easton-Ellis style but more conventional in the drive of its narrative - you usually have the sense something is happening or is going to happen unlike in Less Than Zero, where nothing seems to be happening for much of the novel. However, whilst I found Less Than Zero more challenging, it is a quick read and as it contains the same characters but is set earlier it is by no means essential but is recommended that you read that first.

This is one of those books which shows you that you can have an interesting and entertaining story even when none of the main characters are at all likable. This is what happened to the kids who had lots of money but no love in Less Than Zero. They've grown up and they're still not happy (unsurprisingly). It's not pretty but it is compelling. A study in power, corruption and emptiness - this bleak tale is actually smooth reading thanks to Easton-Ellis' slick, distinctive style. Judging by other critical response to this I have read, in my opinion this is underrated.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "I never liked anyone and I'm afraid of people" 18 July 2011
By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
The old gang from "Less Than Zero" are revisited in a sort of sequel, "Imperial Bedrooms". They were wasted as teenagers and they're wasted in middle age. Trent Burroughs is married to Blair, Julian Wells is around, Rip Millar is creepier than the last time, while Clay is as vapid and self-absorbed as ever.

The story begins with a film Clay wrote and is helping produce, "The Listeners", where he meets a desperate and beautiful actress, Rain Turner, who will do anything for a starring role. Clay and Rain become involved but then the murders start happening and Clay doesn't realise what he's gotten himself into nor who Rain really is. Mysterious texts follow sackings of his flat and blue/green BMWs stalking Clay wherever he goes. Somehow his "friends" are all tied into this and Clay has to decide who to trust...

If not for the characters' names this could easily be a standalone book rather than a sequel. Besides finding out that our heroes of "Less" turn out to be older and still behave like they did 25 years ago, it's not exactly a revelatory update. But that's fine because the book is more than the better for it. It launches straight into the story. The story seems very The Hills/The OC in style; it's all about who slept with who, what their game is, jilted love, revenge, etc. except for several horrific scenes. I'm thinking of what Clay does to the two hookers at the end and the grotesque murder (all detailed) of one of the main characters by another. Also, while this is a Hollywood novel, Ellis doesn't do what most Hollywood novels do and inject satire or parody into the story. It's a straightfoward serious story that plays off of perceived Hollywood stereotypes to construct something original.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so hot mess!
I suspect this book makes sense inside BEE's head - he simply forgot to convey it clearly to the reader. Read more
Published 6 months ago by Nifi Seti
5.0 out of 5 stars Sequel to Less Than Zero
Well put together; in my opinion another beauty.
The characters, i.e Clay, Rip, Blair and Trent are older and more shady now. Read more
Published 8 months ago by Jenny
2.0 out of 5 stars not his best
Maybe it was because I am looking at a writer from the perspectives of his cult classics, but I feel that this novel really didn't show the development and maturity that the years... Read more
Published 12 months ago by thelibrarian
2.0 out of 5 stars Silly
It tries to be provocative, but ends up seeming like an adolescent fantasy. I enjoyed Less Than Zero (admittedly when I was an adolescent), so perhaps this is just Brett Easton... Read more
Published 13 months ago by Monte
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad boy is back
Mr E is back - and he is more wicked than ever - a worthy descendant of LESS THAN ZERO, a brother of AMERICAN PSYCHO - really loved it
Published 18 months ago by M. Woischneck
3.0 out of 5 stars The mixed reviews are understandable
'Less Than Zero' was given to me as a gift and I've never read anything like it before. The minimalist style, the lack of chapters (making events flow in some kind of relentless... Read more
Published 20 months ago by EricCotton
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed
I'm a fan of Ellis and own his other titles so I thought I would purchase this book to complete my collection. Read more
Published 21 months ago by Mr. Dan M. Littlewood
2.0 out of 5 stars How on earth did Less Than Zero turn into this?
As this is a sequel of the not bad Less Than Zero, I was interested to see where it would go. Needless to say I wasn't too impressed by the direction it took. Read more
Published 21 months ago by J. Shardlow
5.0 out of 5 stars Misunderstood Masterpiece
I thought he'd "lost it" with Glamorama but was delighted with the bonkers imagery and humour of Lunar Park. Read more
Published 23 months ago by M Browning
2.0 out of 5 stars If you're a BEE newbie do your homework first ...
In my opinion not the best place to start with BEE. After finishing it I realise I should maybe have started at the beginning with him so that I can really appreciate and... Read more
Published on 15 Aug 2012 by EmmaS
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback